Let's have your autumn fishing pics..

daveg

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Joined
Aug 20, 2016
Messages
17
Stunning pictures, nature at its best, never tell me fishings boring. So glad these pics have been posted so I can show friends what its all about.
 

riverninja

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Joined
Feb 12, 2013
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Location
Perthshire
An autumn trout from the River Tay
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Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
 

scobo

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Jan 9, 2010
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Fife
Misread the thread title, sorry. :eek:mg:
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Sep 29, 2008
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Embra
Here are some autumnal shots taken on Loch Lomond...

<Click on images and + for largest view>

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Col
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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The photos I have posted were taken over the past 10 years. During that time I have used 4 different dSLR cameras, and upwards of a dozen lenses (as important, if not more so than the camera). So, any one photo could have been taken with one of about 50 different combinations of camera and lens.

I try to steer clear of promoting brands of gear - in fact it tees me off when folk come on and try and impress us with how their brand of gear is better than what the rest of us are using... and note how the more inclined they are to impress us with their gear, the fewer photos they show us... :rolleyes: The simple truth is that most modern digital cameras are equally capable of taking a photo that looks just as good as that taken with any other, when displayed at the resolution we are veiwing them at here.

The one constant in all my photos is my use of shooting RAW files and using Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) to process them. When I look at the 10 year old shots I've posted and look at the ones I have taken this year, I can see my own learning curve with ACR laid out before me. What I spent an hour on in 2007, I can now get just-so, in 60 seconds from camera to internet.

Camera-wise, it's really about taking control and learning how to shoot in 'Manual', with as little as possible in 'Auto' settings, then processing your own shots, rather than just settling for JPEGs from the camera. That applies to any camera. That, and developing an eye for a composition; an eye for good light; making the effort to take the camera with you; making the effort to take it out and take shots with it; making the effort to share your shots with others, rather than just banging on about how great your gear is. :p

Col
 

Mrtrout

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Mar 21, 2008
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Location
England.
My fishing partner is a keen photographer, he uses Canon, with some Canon lenses, and various other makes.
He was the chap I gave your list of lenses to the other week Col, but he couldn't afford any sorry.
Today I took a rod and he brought the camera, six Buzzards soaring high above us at one point, then two Eurofighters. .:D
Before we left he was fine tuning his lenses in, rather like I used to do with my rifle scope zeroing it in.
He had a small triangular shaped cardboard box with various patterns on it, about two feet from the lense, he took a shot and it showed if it needed to be advanced or retarded? You'll know what I'm on about Col, all a bit beyond me but very clever.
S.
 

kenneth

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Sep 7, 2009
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446
Location
Rome, Italy
Wow, some amazing photos, thanks for sharing, everyone!

Autumn fishing for trout is almost a no-go in Central Italy, the closed season for Class "A", i.e., Salmonid, rivers begins the first Sunday of October and ends the last Sunday of February.

Class "B" waters remain open throughout the year and a few of them do contain trout, although they are far more popular as coarse fisheries.

Still, I have managed to fish Class "A" waters in end September and/or beginning October, here's a photo that I like:

kenneth-albums-kenneth-picture20356-2017101001.jpg


Kenneth
 

fishfinger

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Sep 17, 2007
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Glasgow
Thanks for sharing your wonderful pics Col they are simply amazing . I bought a new wee point and shoot camera yesterday . If even one of my photos turn out as good as one of yours I will be doing cartwheels 😂
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Embra
Thanks for sharing your wonderful pics Col they are simply amazing . I bought a new wee point and shoot camera yesterday . If even one of my photos turn out as good as one of yours I will be doing cartwheels 😂

Thanks everyone, for all the kind comments. To all those going out to shoot some autumn shots with point-and-shoot cameras, it is worth paying attention to your 'white balance'. I posted this in the photography section the other day...

https://www.flyfishing.co.uk/photography-forum/385232-white-balance-tip-jpeg-shooters.html#post2297097

The thing about autumn colours is: they are warm! Reds and oranges and browns and yellows. That is exactly the sort of thing that fools cameras set to 'Auto' white balance. Set to Auto, they have to make guesses, and warm autumn colours fool them into thinking you are using cool (temperature-wise) light, such as that from a tungsten bulb (2850-3200 Kelvin). The camera will look to neutralise that coldness by making the white balance similarly cold. This will give it a blue cast, totally destroying the warm autumnal colours.

(I know it takes a bit of getting your head round the whole colour temperature thing, whereby visibly warm colours such as red are cold, temperature-wise, and cold colours such as blue are hot, temperature-wise. Think of a Bunsen burner. The coolest part of the flame, temperature-wise is the red/yellow edge, while the hottest part, temperature-wise, is the blue/white cone at the centre.)

I've done a wee double exercise here to illustrate 2 points in one - the white balance issue and the benefits of shooting RAW files.

The shot below is one from Glencorse Res a couple of weeks ago. The autumnal colours were getting going, and there was some nice warm light, first thing in the morning.

If I had done a point-and-shoot, with Auto white balance, and got a JPEG from the camera, it might have given me something like this...


It's a bit cold-looking, yes?

By shooting RAW files, I get to do my own 'developing', which includes being able to set my own white balance, making it as warm as I care to do. I also get to do things like balance the bright sky with the dark land - a challenge for so many fishing-orientated shots. Finally, I trimmed the unappealing bottom edge off it, giving me this...

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That's a bit better, eh? And no 'Photoshopping' required - all the data presented above was recorded by the camera in the original capture - it just needed teased out by the captor. It took 60 seconds. ;)

And that, essentially, is the simple difference between so many photos. The 'Point and Shoot' auto-JPEG, versus the self-processed RAW file. Folk accustomed to taking point and shoot JPEGs see a well-processed RAW file and understandably assume it is down to the gear being used, but to a fair extent it is down to the RAW processing. Point and shoot entrusts RAW processing to the lump of mindless electronics you took the shot with. Shooting RAW hands the whole process over to you, so you can do a decent job of it.

So, point-and-shootists: if you are going out after autumnal shots, don't use 'Auto' white balance. Avoid cold by going to 'Daylight' (5500-5600K), warm it up by going to 'Cloudy' (6500K), or really give it some heat by going to 'Shade' (7500K). ;)

Col
 
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