Line developing coiling issues after playing a big fish? What a muppet I am...

richfish1

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I've often almost started a thread on 'why the hell has my flyline started to coil after hooking into large fish?' Well, I think I've answered it myself now, and I feel like a total fool.
I'm very, very careful when spooling flylines on, because line twist is probably the most annoying thing in flyfishing... well it is when it happens to me. In my mind the best way to get a slight coil when a line is straight from the box is hook into and play a good fish... and yes I'd still go with that.
But, and it's a big but.... don't, when you're winding the backing on, Wind it on so the backing spool is rolling around the room willy nilly. I'm sure this is where my line twist comes from. The line is fantastic until a good fish runs a good amount of backing from the spool, the line twist in the backing is then transferred into the flyline. It's then never the same until I take the line for a walk through grass.
Am I talking dross? I never have the issue with river lines or lines I use for small stillwater wildies (they never allow me to see the backing)
 
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taffy1

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In both of his books, Sea Trout & Salmon Fishing Hugh Falkus recommended stripping your line back off the reel after playing a large fish & rewinding under slight tension. His thinking behind this was to prevent coils of line being "bedded" down & creating reel-jam, in a way I suppose, this could also prevent line twist to a certain extent.
 

richfish1

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In both of his books, Sea Trout & Salmon Fishing Hugh Falkus recommended stripping your line back off the reel after playing a large fish & rewinding under slight tension. His thinking behind this was to prevent coils of line being "bedded" down & creating reel-jam, in a way I suppose, this could also prevent line twist to a certain extent.
Maybe, did he give any reasons why the line would be twisted? I'm very conscious about the fact that the lines I've had problems with, are the lines where I've wound backing on in the house and waited until the Mrs has come home to wind lines on. ( but only after the backing has been well off reel in playing of fish)
 

icejohn

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It's a fact just after each fly cast you have just put half a twist into the fly line. I suppose after a big fish fight all the twists become more concentrated in one area so you notice it more. For me it was always near the line shoot point. A quick win to "not shoot" the line at that point put drop the cast into the water and take off you fly reel. Turn the fly reel anticlockwise or clockwise depending on which direction the twists go. I found I had to do this process twice then line is back in a normal state for a few hours. The reel spin method as I call it is easier than the walking line through grass.
 

rusty

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It's a fact just after each fly cast you have just put half a twist into the fly line. I suppose after a big fish fight all the twists become more concentrated in one area so you notice it more. For me it was always near the line shoot point. A quick win to "not shoot" the line at that point put drop the cast into the water and take off you fly reel. Turn the fly reel anticlockwise or clockwise depending on which direction the twists go. I found I had to do this process twice then line is back in a normal state for a few hours. The reel spin method as I call it is easier than the walking line through grass.

Can you please explain the initial statement ie each cast introduces half a twist in the line.

I think this would only happen with incorrect tracking and then I am unsure about the half twist dimension.

Rusty:confused:
 

lepirate

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Twist from backing transferring to line makes sense. Some years ago I found that not letting the line spool revolve (as compared to letting it hop about across the floor) resulted in twist to the mono I loaded on a multiplyer for beach casting. Sticking the spool on a chopstick and letting it revolve sorted the problem. (can hold a chopstick with toes... :D)
 
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wobbly face

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Incorrect line or backing spooling will create line twist. Casting, it's not tracking but wrist rotation that will cause slight twist. A big factor in causing line twist (if you have loaded line and backing correctly) is figure of eight retrieve. :eek:mg:
 

ohanzee

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It's a fact just after each fly cast you have just put half a twist into the fly line

Its a fact that it doesn't when I'm doing it:D

---------- Post added at 08:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:13 PM ----------

Am I talking dross?

I think subconsciously you know you twisted that backing:whistle::D

Makes sense actually, not that many would ever know:)
 

icejohn

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Well guys at the risk of saying everyone casts the same.... Obviously not. But in my case I tend to pull the line back low and push the line high on the forward stroke. This puts a twist in the the line. Becaue the line is actually travelling in a circle around the rod tip. Or if we think of a clock face against the back of the caster my back cast travels in the 10am position. My forward cast travels at the 12 am position.

The shorter the leader length of then the closer to the 12 o'clock position both stokes become. But on the resovior with 16ft leader you need a big loop to prevent tangles. Ps I am left handed would help here I suppose to explain the clock positions. Omg.

So for right handed caster the back cast would be the 2pm position.
 
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ohanzee

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Well guys at the risk of saying everyone casts the same.... Obviously not. But in my case I tend to pull the line back low and push the line high on the forward stroke. This puts a twist in the the line. Becaue the line is actually travelling in a circle around the rod tip. Or if we think of a clock face against the back of the caster my back cast travels in the 10am position. My forward cast travels at the 12 am position.

The shorter the leader length of then the closer to the 12 o'clock position both stokes become. But on the resovior with 16ft leader you need a big loop to prevent tangles. Ps I am left handed would help here I suppose to explain the clock positions. Omg.

So for right handed caster the back cast would be the 2pm position.

I'm a bit lost with the clock face thing but you can get twist with a continual oval cast, drawing low into a back cast and delivering high, the problem appears to come from curving the tip path as you cast.
You can cast on different planes, back different from forward without twisting if you let the line extend fully and track straight on each plane.
 

original cormorant

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I've often almost started a thread on 'why the hell has my flyline started to coil after hooking into large fish?' Well, I think I've answered it myself now, and I feel like a total fool.
I'm very, very careful when spooling flylines on, because line twist is probably the most annoying thing in flyfishing... well it is when it happens to me. In my mind the best way to get a slight coil when a line is straight from the box is hook into and play a good fish... and yes I'd still go with that.
But, and it's a big but.... don't, when you're winding the backing on, Wind it on so the backing spool is rolling around the room willy nilly. I'm sure this is where my line twist comes from. The line is fantastic until a good fish runs a good amount of backing from the spool, the line twist in the backing is then transferred into the flyline. It's then never the same until I take the line for a walk through grass.
Am I talking dross? I never have the issue with river lines or lines I use for small stillwater wildies (they never allow me to see the backing)


I'm simply amazed that any angler would wind backing from spool to reel letting the backing spool bounce around the room rather than winding it carefully under control. To me this seems like trashing your backing before it's ever been used.

Not sure how with a spool bouncing around room you get tension on the backing. Personally I first wind new backing onto a heavyweight salmon reel (weighs 16 oz empty) - without adding twist to it. I set the drag on this reel so that it is just enough to support the weight of this reel off the floor then wind from this reel to the actual destination reel. This gives me a constant tension on the backing and allows me to load it evenly.
 

fredaevans

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First thing I do on the river (no fly on the leader) is pull off at least 60-70 feet of line and let it hang down in the current for a couple of minutes. Water pressure will (usually) take out any twists. With many spey casts getting a bit of line twist is a 'given.'
 

speytime

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To find any twist and fix them pull out your line drop a 4/5 ft loop, if it does anything other than just hang in a loop it's twisted, to fix twist the line with your fingers until the line hangs in a loop wind on and repeat.
It's not as tedious as it sounds and it leaves the line straight on the reel.
Al
 

raphael

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First thing I do on the river (no fly on the leader) is pull off at least 60-70 feet of line and let it hang down in the current for a couple of minutes. Water pressure will (usually) take out any twists. With many spey casts getting a bit of line twist is a 'given.'

Same thing. I also remarked that quite often (when used double handers with Scandi + running), the twists propagate towards the running line which seems to be solely affected. The solution is to strip the full belly and the section of the running which is concerned and let all go in the current until the line is straight; then wind it gently and all shall be OK.

What I do not understand is why sometimes it happens and sometimes not...
 

lipslicker

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What I do not understand is why sometimes it happens and sometimes not...

Is it the case that when you fish one bank solely, it develops, but when you keep swapping banks there is no need to uncoil it.
One imagines if you keep swapping your casting side, the casting action itself will unravel it for you.
 

raphael

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I really do not know, but your idea of swapping bank even if indeed technically interesting is not useful in many cases. Maybe changing of casting method, i.e insert some snap-T in a sequence of single spey, or change hand and switch to double spey, if weather and current allow... That might be what you meant and there might be something to investigate. I will ask my instructors on the French salmon club forum.
 

ohanzee

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Is it the case that when you fish one bank solely, it develops, but when you keep swapping banks there is no need to uncoil it.
One imagines if you keep swapping your casting side, the casting action itself will unravel it for you.

Not if you cast the same way with the same arm:) you could cast off shoulder and rotate in the opposite direction, makes sense but no idea if it works because my perfect spey casting never twists the line:)
 

lipslicker

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I really do not know, but your idea of swapping bank even if indeed technically interesting is not useful in many cases. Maybe changing of casting method, i.e insert some snap-T in a sequence of single spey, or change hand and switch to double spey, if weather and current allow... That might be what you meant and there might be something to investigate. I will ask my instructors on the French salmon club forum.

Yeah, sorry, that is exactly what I mean.
Casting from the same side must surely lead to a certain degree of line twisting, whereas a swap of sides/methods might unravel it.
Swapping banks, I find, encourages that swap of sides a bit more, as you deal with wind over different shoulders.

Just a thought.
Let us know what instructor suggests?

- - - Updated - - -
 

lipslicker

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Not if you cast the same way with the same arm:) you could cast off shoulder and rotate in the opposite direction, makes sense but no idea if it works because my perfect spey casting never twists the line:)

Yeah, that is what I meant when I said "swapping casting side".
Casting off one shoulder involves a clockwise movement of the rod, but counter-clockwise the other.
Imagine it makes a big difference if you stick with one, or whether you keep swapping throughout a session.

Or, as you say, chucking in the odd variant to mix it up a bit.
 
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