Line Recomendations Of Lines For Sage SLT 9FT6 #6 Weight

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
Well, if you look at the BFCC senior distance records the 'can' ain't that big . . .

5wt - 138' 3" - 9.07g
7wt - 146' 6" - 11.99g
9wt - 148 3" - 15.55g

. . . 10ft over 4 line sizes in competition conditions.

Mr Normal Angler isn't going to guarantee himself extra distance by using a fly line that's 4 sizes larger and which weighs the same as a 10p piece more. We choose our line sizes to suit where, how and the the conditions within which we're fishing. Distance is only one variable and not reliant on weight.
The T38 record is 209' 8" - 38g shooting head.

This is obviously an extreme example but I'd argue that a shooting head line will probably give an average caster more distance.
 
Last edited:

speytime

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
West Lothian Scotland
Barrio slx and airflo 40+ are popular for a reason.
The extra weight makes them easy to cast further, weight also benificial when it's windy or your using bigger sized flies you can swap between spey and overhead casts.
I really don't see the need to stick rigidly to rod/line weights.

Al
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
The AFFTA ratings have become somewhat fluid over the years. One of the first examples of this was when Sage released the TCR and then Rio launched the Rio Grand to go with it. Essentially a line-weight heavier than stated for a rod that was also considerably faster than other rods for that line rating. Good distance caters can get the TCR to work with a matched rated line, but mere mortals struggled with the 'magic distance casting stick' unless it was 'overlined' or in this case used with a line more suitable to its actual action.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Northants
When I started along the GAIA qualification path I bought myself a 9ft, 5wt, TCR and yes, with some practice you can get the backing knot rattling up through the rod rings. However, for much of the GAIA syllabus, presentation, slack line casts etc, it's not a 'good tool' and as a fishing rod with a 5wt line it's 'orrible! It's a rod I rarely use these days except I sometimes use it with 35ft, 7wt shooting heads for a bit of bank fishing. I caught my PB brown with that combination (14lb) from Lechlade.
 

boisker

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Devon
Trouble is there is no recognised methodology or system for rod weights... it’s basically- make a rod, then the designer calls the line weight... the sage tcr in a 5w is more like a 6.5 if compared to the ccs classification... where as another rod builder, say a classic winston design, may produce a 5w rod that actually matches the ccs 5w range.
5w lines have a very specific range (admittedly fly line manufactures choose to ignore it, but at least you can check), whereas a rod is whatever the maker marked it up as.
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
When I started along the GAIA qualification path I bought myself a 9ft, 5wt, TCR and yes, with some practice you can get the backing knot rattling up through the rod rings. However, for much of the GAIA syllabus, presentation, slack line casts etc, it's not a 'good tool' and as a fishing rod with a 5wt line it's 'orrible! It's a rod I rarely use these days except I sometimes use it with 35ft, 7wt shooting heads for a bit of bank fishing. I caught my PB brown with that combination (14lb) from Lechlade.
I used a 6wt Z-Axis for my GAIC... still got it and use it regularly. I also have a GLoomis GLX (the original 2-piece) which was described by Paul Arden as 'one of the best rods ever made'. It's a tad softer than the equivalent TCR but still too damn fast for everything but distance casting with a matched line. I wheel it out occasionally when a client asks about the benefits of fast rods! After a few cast most just look at their feet and say 'Hmmmm....'.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Northants
I only use RIO lines for my Sage nowadays. RIO lines are made for Sage rods as they are the same company, so it makes a lot of sense to me.
As are Reddington Rods, also owned by Farbank Enterprises. Presumably, Shakespeare lines are made for Hardy rods as Shakespeare are also owned by Pure Fishing.
 

sewinbasher

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
North East Wales
Barrio slx and airflo 40+ are popular for a reason.
The extra weight makes them easy to cast further, weight also benificial when it's windy or your using bigger sized flies you can swap between spey and overhead casts.
I really don't see the need to stick rigidly to rod/line weights.

Al
The main problem with the 40+ is that they have a tendency to land like a sack of spuds! Useless for spooky fish!
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
I only use RIO lines for my Sage nowadays. RIO lines are made for Sage rods as they are the same company, so it makes a lot of sense to me.
That's fine if you like their lines, I use Rio for most of my saltwater fishing but never really got on with the freshwater range (apart from the old Trout LT). Plenty of people rave about the Rio Gold but I can't get on with it. I've tried it on several rods including 3 different Sage's but prefer a longer less aggressive head. It's horses for courses for lines and rods.
 

dave b

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
UK
Garry if banks behind limit the line you can aerialise the Wychwood Connect Rocket Taper isn't a bad line for stillwaters. It'll load the rod quickly and they seem to be correct to rating.

You can pick them up for just over £21 on ebay.
 

garrynic

Well-known member
Points
8
Thanks for all the replies guys
Seems to be a few divided opinions, but does make for some interesting reading
Cheers
 
Top