LOM 23/11/21

The Endrick Spider

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A good day on the lake.16 to net .but not for me.I had 4 .dropped 5 (eek) but my boat partner hung onto his fish to end with 12.










Best fish 7lb.I Had a 6lb'er + 2 about 5lb.

Jim
Well done Jim to you and your boat partner. It seems as though not only do the fish follow your boat about, so too does the good weather. It is your angling skills that deliver the fish but you cant control the weather. As far as the weather goes, apart from one very wild day you have landed very lucky this year
 

codyarrow

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Think you picked the best day this week. Weekend looks like surf boards might be more appropriate.
First drop on snow / hail here today.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Good going, Jim. (y) What were you getting them on?

I ended-up accepting a last-minute invite to have a day on Coldingham yesterday. It was decidedly cool and a lot brighter and breezier than the forecast. It was slow-going with all the various stuff we tried - nymphs, washing-line, etc. However, there was an occasional cowdung about, and we were seeing the occasional rise. We ended-up going over to dries and catching the majority of our fish on them. Poor conversion rate though - too many 'fresh air' shots. But the fish will have seen a lot by now - nervous Neryses, the lot of them! 🤪 The evening rise took place just as the light was going... about 2:30 p.m! 😜

I was blummin' glad to get the car heater on going back down the road.

Had my new specs on. Jeezo - what a difference. I can tie a fly on like I could when I was young. I had no idea I was needing a new prescription so much!

Col
 

3lbgrayling

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Good going, Jim. (y) What were you getting them on?

I ended-up accepting a last-minute invite to have a day on Coldingham yesterday. It was decidedly cool and a lot brighter and breezier than the forecast. It was slow-going with all the various stuff we tried - nymphs, washing-line, etc. However, there was an occasional cowdung about, and we were seeing the occasional rise. We ended-up going over to dries and catching the majority of our fish on them. Poor conversion rate though - too many 'fresh air' shots. But the fish will have seen a lot by now - nervous Neryses, the lot of them! 🤪 The evening rise took place just as the light was going... about 2:30 p.m! 😜

I was blummin' glad to get the car heater on going back down the road.

Had my new specs on. Jeezo - what a difference. I can tie a fly on like I could when I was young. I had no idea I was needing a new prescription so much!

Col
Bung tactics Col:eek:.Mohito eggstacy/Sockey eggstascy/Cat bug.

Jim
 

The Endrick Spider

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He has converted to the dark side!
Bung fishing? Jim! Jim! Jim!
Anglers have been bung fishing ever since I can remember but the only thing is, this form of fly fishing never had a name.
When I first started fly fishing, (1958) after my dinner I would head down to my local river where I started off by making my way down the river fishing the wet fly. When it was time to head for home, greased the line to make it float (there were no floating lines then) and fished upstream. If there were trout rising the cast would be a single dry fly. ( black badger or a grey duster) If there were no fish rising it would be a two fly cast, a dry fly on the bob and a Williams Favourite on the tail, the dry fly being used as a bung.
When I fished my local dam, with the dam being tree lined and very soft mud making it impossible to wade, the only way to fish a fly was with a spinning rod and bubble float but in my case it was usually a float made from half a candle. With me having no desire to fish with worms, maggots or spin, if I wanted to fish this dam then had to fish the fly using a spinning rod, the candle being used as a bung.
When I turned to loch fishing using a 3 fly cast, (on a fly rod of course) quite often a deer hair sedge was used as a bob fly even though there would not be any sedges hatching for months. The sedge fly was being used as a bung. The 30 years fishing at night on the River Endrick I used a Hugh Falkus
surface lure made with cork, or, if fishing a two fly cast my own pattern of the Invicta, this had a wing made with grey squirrel tail instead of hen pheasant tail to make it fish higher in the water but I don't suppose these two could be classified as bungs.
After reading all of this, as you will see some form of bung fishing has been going on for a very long time, ever since I first started fly fishing.
 

geo4316

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At this time of year on the small fisherys i go to, the bung is the tactic used by most. Walking round the bank talking to fisherman, out of probably 15 nearly all were using the bung. I quite enjoy fishing it, i love when it goes right under with a good take. Deadly on its day
 

The Endrick Spider

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Dont I just know that!
Fish a big bouyant dry as first dropper many a time, with good results.
But the bung as often described, is just another method of float fishing!
I am perfectly aware of the fact that bung fishing is often described as a form of float fishing but have often wondered, those anglers that a are saying this, do they themselves use floating lines?
When you cast out a floating fly line with let us say a 3 fly wet fly cast we are told by the experts to stay fully focused on the end of the fly line, or, on any kinks on the line. Any slight movement of the line being drawn away then tighten right away in the hope that it is a fish. This is all standard practice when using a floating line but it is still a form of float fishing, the fly line being used as an indicator.
I have never at any time ever used an actual bung as such but it has now got to the stage where I can no longer see a dry fly at 18/20 yards. With this in mind, as I am not prepared to go out and start buying the actual bungs, have made my own. Have you ever seen those rubber mats that are used in kids play areas, the ones that lock into one another like parts of a jigsaw? I obtained a few of these mats that were being thrown out which were in pink, yellow, green and blue. As I keep on saying, everything has got another use therefore use these as a kneeling mat when weeding the garden. I have now found yet another use for them where the part used for locking them together, as I do not require two mats locked together, these bits have been cut off and made into a bung. A hole was drilled through each piece and a longshank hook inserted into the rubber making it secure using the eye of the hook for tying onto my cast. Whether I will ever use them I do not know but they are there in my armoury if ever I need them, all part of the, 'Just in Case' team.
I love catching fish for it is all part of a days fishing. Our loch is a brown trout fishery where I can honestly say that although I love catching fish it must be over 15 years since I last killed a brown trout. We also have a few rainbow trout in the loch where it is only recently that I have started to take the very occasional rainbow trout that are given to pensioners. At one time 3lb Grayling would call in at the house and drop off the occasional rainbow when he had been fishing in competitions where they had to kill their fish for the weigh in but I think they have different rules now. This saved me from killing any of our own stock of rainbows whenever a pensioner had asked me for a fish. As I said previously, I love catching fish on flies that I have created myself on materials that I have gathered up myself that have all came free. Once they have been caught I am just as pleased to see them being returned and swimming away free.
 

Wee Jimmy

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With all due respect Endrick, there is a rather large difference between the tip of a floating line and a one inch block of polystyrene when it comes to take registration and it’s ability to hold up one or two weighted flies.
As one who was used to using the line tip or floating leader butt as my visual take indication, I can say that I was astonished at just how much more efficient an “indicator” was at the job in comparison.Even the takes which I knew from experience were of the subtle variety, were now glaringly obvious.

We can call it what we want but we all know what it is and the choice to use it or not, should always be a personal one.
 
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The Endrick Spider

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Just back
With all due respect Endrick, there is a rather large difference between the tip of a floating line and a one inch block of polystyrene when it comes to take registration and it’s ability to hold up one or two weighted flies.
As one who was used to using the line tip or floating leader butt as my visual take indication, I can say that I was astonished at just how much more efficient an “indicator” was at the job in comparison.Even the takes which I knew from experience were of the subtle variety, were now glaringly obvious.

We can call it what we want but we all know what it is and the choice to use it or not, should always be a personal one.
Just arrived back home off the lower slopes of the Campsie Fells with the dogs. The tup's in the field are having a great time of it, there are pheasants everywhere but there won't be as many next week for it is the first shoot on the estate on Saturday. With very little shooting done last winter there should be some good pheasant centre tails on the go. A friend of mine has 8 working dogs where his services are always in demand therefore have asked him to keep me centre tails off any old pheasants. You have really got to wait until after Boxing Day to get the very best tails for by then the birds will have completed their moult.
Back to bung fishing Jimmy, as I have never tried proper bung fishing will take your word for it. As I also explained I have always used a dry fly as my bung but can no longer see it. It would be quite simple to tie up one of those high viz things but to be truthful am not really that interested. When I go fishing I completely switch off where I do my own thing. Always having been a loner, when out fishing I am perfectly happy in my own company, when out with the dogs I am perfectly happy having their company, I don't like to meet up with anyone on the water or on the hills. It is of no interest to me whatsoever what other people are doing or what they are catching on, I have always figured things out for myself for I find this the best way of learning.
Anyway Jimmy thanks for that information, much appreciated.
Tight lines and screaming reels.

John.
 

Wee Jimmy

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Back to bung fishing Jimmy, as I have never tried proper bung fishing will take your word for it. As I also explained I have always used a dry fly as my bung but can no longer see it. It would be quite simple to tie up one of those high viz things but to be truthful am not really that interested. When I go fishing I completely switch off where I do my own thing. Always having been a loner, when out fishing I am perfectly happy in my own company, when out with the dogs I am perfectly happy having their company, I don't like to meet up with anyone on the water or on the hills. It is of no interest to me whatsoever what other people are doing or what they are catching on, I have always figured things out for myself for I find this the best way of learning.
Anyway Jimmy thanks for that information, much appreciated.
Tight lines and screaming reels.

John.
Fair play John I’m the same myself in some regards, it should all be about enjoying ourselves at the end of the day and we all have ways we like to go about it. For the record,I’m not interested in bung fishing either as it takes me over a line that I’m not comfortable crossing....but that’s my problem,no one else’s...ATB👍
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Anglers have been bung fishing ever since I can remember but the only thing is, this form of fly fishing never had a name.

FWIW, just my own way of doing 'the naming of parts', John...

I think the term bung should be kept for things that are used as artificial floats that have no other purpose than to suspend flies vertically below them in the water column. In other words, they are doing the same job as a coarse fishing float that is used to suspend the bait vertically below it in the water column. That is what the word 'bung' now most commonly refers to in a fishing context, so using it to describe other things, such as dry flies, I reckon is asking for confusion.

A bubble float certainly constitutes a bung, but for me a dry fly is never a bung. I never use one as a float to suspend flies vertically underneath it. If I was to fish the 'Klink and dink', I might have a decision to make, though the Klink is there to catch fish too, so it differs from a float in that acting as a float is not its sole purpose. However, I am not a Klink and dink fisher, so that problem doesn't come up. I might use a bushy sedgehog or a foam daddy on the end of a washing-line rig, in place of the usual booby or FAB, but I would never call that a 'bung'.

I do use visual aides, such as watching the end of a greased-up fly-line. Also, a small piece of red wool or other sight-indicator on a Czech nymphing rig helps to spot the line lifting with a take. And occasionally, when nymphing, I will add a small piece of red wool at the end of the fly line when the light is making it impossible to see the tip of the fly line. But none of these are interfering with the travel of the flies through the water.

While I never add buoyancy (or weight) to the line or leader, I freely use weighted flies and flies with added foam buoyancy. Some folk draw the line at that practice. 😜

As Jimmy says, we all draw our own line in the sand that we choose not to cross when it comes to what constitutes 'fly fishing'. ;)

Col
 

aenoon

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FWIW, just my own way of doing 'the naming of parts', John...

I think the term bung should be kept for things that are used as artificial floats that have no other purpose than to suspend flies vertically below them in the water column. In other words, they are doing the same job as a coarse fishing float that is used to suspend the bait vertically below it in the water column. That is what the word 'bung' now most commonly refers to in a fishing context, so using it to describe other things, such as dry flies, I reckon is asking for confusion.

A bubble float certainly constitutes a bung, but for me a dry fly is never a bung. I never use one as a float to suspend flies vertically underneath it. If I was to fish the 'Klink and dink', I might have a decision to make, though the Klink is there to catch fish too, so it differs from a float in that acting as a float is not its sole purpose. However, I am not a Klink and dink fisher, so that problem doesn't come up. I might use a bushy sedgehog or a foam daddy on the end of a washing-line rig, in place of the usual booby or FAB, but I would never call that a 'bung'.

I do use visual aides, such as watching the end of a greased-up fly-line. Also, a small piece of red wool or other sight-indicator on a Czech nymphing rig helps to spot the line lifting with a take. And occasionally, when nymphing, I will add a small piece of red wool at the end of the fly line when the light is making it impossible to see the tip of the fly line. But none of these are interfering with the travel of the flies through the water.

While I never add buoyancy (or weight) to the line or leader, I freely use weighted flies and flies with added foam buoyancy. Some folk draw the line at that practice. 😜

As Jimmy says, we all draw our own line in the sand that we choose not to cross when it comes to what constitutes 'fly fishing'. ;)

Col
To my mind too.
Bung fishing seems to be attaching that large indicator, be it a large bunch of flourescent yarn, or other floating material, with a hook in it somewhere, often just to appease "the rules", and chucked out with whatever fly/lure suspended below, and then allowed to "float" about under its own steam.
That as per the description is float fishing.
 

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