Looking for casting advice

JamesW97

Member
Points
3
As someone who is new to fly fishing I'm wondering how much I should practice before i try to catch fish. I've practiced to the point where I can sort of cast and I have waders but I can't get much line out when I cast. I don't have money for a teacher so I'm stuck for what I should do. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
It feels a bit odd not advising to get one to one help but strange times.

You can cast to about 70' with a fairly simple set of principles, say 9' rod, 11' leader and 30' of line out in front of you, trap line with your forefinger, lift and lay and you have 50' from foot to fly.

Peel another 20' of line off and drop it at your feet, then do as before and just let the line go after the stop, shoot to 70'.

Gets you started.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Points
83
Location
West Lothian Scotland
The Joan Wulf dvd was certainly a big help to my casting I'd recommend it... There's a slim chance I've got a copy I can give you.
Failing that it's on a broken hdd along with 100s of gb of fishing related stuff 😩

Al
 

speytime

Well-known member
Points
83
Location
West Lothian Scotland
Your in luck I found a copy of Joan Wulf.
I'll need a few days to get a copy done, as above my original is on a knackered hdd so it's the last copy I have.

When looking for it I also found a couple of Oliver Edwards, Ally Gowans, Rio, Ian Barr, Andy Nichol, Ian Barr+Matt Hayes, The underwater world of trout, Brian Chan choronomid fishing and I've not scratched the surface 🧐

Al
 

suzzy buzzer

Well-known member
Points
28
Quite a few years ago, the chap that taught me to cast gave me a very good exercise.

you need a little space, but it works very well.
Put yourself into a space that will have 15 yds either side of you, and a few in front.

To start, lay the rod on the ground in front of you, at about 10 o’clock.

pull out 6 or so yd’s of line, plus a tapered leader, with some wool on the end. Straighten it all out.

pick up the rod , and hold the tip 18” off the floor, with the butt at a comfortable height near your waist.

*Using what you would call a casting stroke, transfer the angle of the rod to the 2 o clock position, in doing so, picking up the line, forming a loop, and laying it down on your right hand side. Then repeat to lay it down in the position you first started.

repeat this process to get a feel for how your acceleration and stopduring the stroke affects your loop shape, and straightness of how the line lays down.

once you are happy with your loop, pickip and lay down of the line, try it with your eyes closed, opening them only too observe how the line and leader has landed.

from this, repeat, but with your rod tip 3 ft from the ground. Keep the line in the air occasionally, laying it down to see how it looks. If you want to do the eyes closed spring the stroke, feel free. It’s all good training for feeling what’s going on in the cast.

To advance from this, it’s a case of bringing the rod tip up, and extending the line.

once you can hold the head of the line in the air, with good loops, you then need to look at shooting line into the delivery, which isn’t as simple as just letting go.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Northants
To answer your op I think you're better learning at/on the river while fishing, the best practice is in situation.

Al
Luckily we don't follow that advice when we're learning to drive.

The problem with 'doing it on your own' as a beginner is twofold - 1. You don't really know what needs to happen to produce the cast and 2. You cannot see / observe what you are doing which may be impeding that happening.

What tends to happen is that the 'practice' becomes an exercise in repeating and reinforcing the same faults - change nothing - nothing changes. When you consider how much we invest in our tackle, day tickets, season permits etc, and hour with a qualified instructor is money well spent and an investment in getting the best from our fishing. At the moment, with current restrictions that would not be possible but, when we return to some form of normality, have a look here.


Meantime, I'd recommend the Joan Wulff videos /DVDs as she often shows a range of exercises that promote the skills of forming an efficient loop.
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
To answer your op I think you're better learning at/on the river while fishing, the best practice is in situation.

Al
I'd have to disagree with this. There are so many other things to think about when actually fishing, especially on a river. Keep it simple to begin with and practice on grass without a fly.
Joan Wulff videos are very good but please ignore the 'wrist snap' advice, at least until you've learnt to cast with a fixed wrist.
Paul Arden's Sexyloop videos are a very good resource and are free.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Points
83
Location
West Lothian Scotland
PaulD I don't dispute what you're saying but pretty much all the fishers I know are self taught and some very successful ones, this get lessons is a new thing when I was younger you got a rod and practiced until you could cast, it's human nature to learn as you go, that's my view anyway.

Al
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Oxfordshire
It would be interesting to know how many of us have never had a lesson or rather started fishing without lessons?

Al
Probably the majority, however I'm yet to meet a fly fisherman who wouldn't benefit from a lesson. It really depend if you want to improve and learn or not. I was once told by someone that 'You can't teach me anything about fly-casting'. He was of course right, but possibly not in the sense he meant...
 

ACW

Well-known member
\there is a site called sexyloops ,lots of good stuff there .
Once the CV18 thing is over a dose of one to one teaching though expensive will move you on incredibly.
I was sort of self taught back in the early 70s,then through this forum I spent a few sessions with a long gone poster here aka Berlin aka carl , that made me cast with far less effort and added yards .
 

catzrob

Well-known member
Points
8
Edit corrected second paragraph to read "two further days fishing on their water with no teaching.

I did a free Orvis lesson followed up by a day on a stillwater with Orvis (they charged about £70 for the lesson I think). Now I am learning by doing with mixed success!

If you're close to Chew then you can get a 5 hour lesson for £70, which includes to bank tickets. So 5 hours lessons and some fishing, plus two further days fishing on their water with no teaching. A day ticket at Chew is over £30. So that's a cheapish way to get another lesson. I will probably do that this season (or next if that's the soonest I can with this covid).
 
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