Looking for casting advice

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
I did a free Orvis lesson followed up by a day on a stillwater with Orvis (they charged about £70 for the lesson I think). Now I am learning by doing with mixed success!

If you're close to Chew then you can get a 5 hour lesson for £70, which includes to bank tickets. So 5 hours lessons and some fishing, plus two further days on their water with no fishing. A day ticket at Chew is over £30. So that's a cheapish way to get another lesson. I will probably do that this season (or next if that's the soonest I can with this covid).
5 hours for £70 I would take that quite happily any day, I fished for years before getting lessons but only because they were £45 per hour.
I know there's things I could improve on but on the whole I can put out a nice tidy line.

Al
 

4wings

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
951
Location
Bristol
I did a free Orvis lesson followed up by a day on a stillwater with Orvis (they charged about £70 for the lesson I think). Now I am learning by doing with mixed success!

If you're close to Chew then you can get a 5 hour lesson for £70, which includes to bank tickets. So 5 hours lessons and some fishing, plus two further days on their water with no fishing. A day ticket at Chew is over £30. So that's a cheapish way to get another lesson. I will probably do that this season (or next if that's the soonest I can with this covid).
I have just had a refund as they are not giving lessons (or fishing) at present, due to Corona virus.
 

Secret Angler

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Messages
2,171
Location
London
As someone who is new to fly fishing I'm wondering how much I should practice before i try to catch fish. I've practiced to the point where I can sort of cast and I have waders but I can't get much line out when I cast. I don't have money for a teacher so I'm stuck for what I should do. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
It takes a fair bit of practice. Even with practice it all seems to go to pot on the bank, at least it did with me, but you gradually get the hang of it. Books and videos if there's no one handy to help.
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
A little unfortunate with the timing at the moment. That Orvis lesson at Chew sounds great but it is a group lesson I would assume. You won't beat a one-to-one lesson. I struggled the 1st two years but I caught fish on stillwater fishery. Tried the river the following year and was completely lost. A kind soul pm'ed me to say he can show me and then I knew how crap I was. His mate took me under his wings and spent some of his valuable time on me and I practiced what they taught me. I am quite comfortable with my casting now. Both were qualified instructors by the way. When the covid is over find a good teacher, they are worth their salt.
 

T_James

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
408
Location
London
I haven't read every comment in detail so I say this at the risk of repetition.

Where will you be fishing, still waters, rivers or the coast? The type of water you'll fish will determine how much success you'll have with limited casting ability. For example a coastal environment with a heavy rod and clouser minnow would be trial by ordeal.

When you do go out fishing tie plenty of leaders (with flies) so when the inevitable tangle occurs you're not wasting time untangling a mess and can return to fishing quickly.
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
3,319
Location
West Oxfordshire
Videoing yourself is a good self-learning aid, especially if your phone has a slow-motion setting. It'll enable you to see fundamentals such as where your rod angle is starting and stopping on each casting stroke and the shape of your loops (which is notoriously difficult to see yourself). One piece of advice that I give people during a lesson is when you practice by yourself, experiment with all aspects of the cast - rod angle, length of stroke, power application etc. which for some people can be a very good way of actually getting an understanding what is going on during the casting stroke (both good and bad) and how this relates to the finished article rather than just teaching the 'correct' way to cast.
 

T_James

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
408
Location
London
Videoing yourself is a good self-learning aid

I am also a drummer and when you first record yourself it can be an upsetting revelation as you hear you're not as good as you thought you were!

Definitely get into the habit of recording yourself.
 

James9118

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
2,204
Location
Hampshire
I was self taught, but then (pretty late in life) I discovered there was such a thing as fly casting as a sport. Once I got into this I quickly came to the realisation that I'd have been a much better caster If I'd of had lessons right from the off. These days I've probably had more lessons (albeit informal) than most, plus I spend more time practicing than the majority. This seems to have paid off as I'm not too bad now, even if I say so myself.

When my other half started fly fishing she went straight for lessons - she's pretty handy with a fly rod too :cool:
 

Jeltz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2007
Messages
3,079
Location
High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire.
All good advice so far, the one thing you really need before you do anything is a rod, reel and line that is balanced. As a beginner buying your own kit, you probably have a line that is too light or heavy, a rod that is too soft or rigid, if that makes sense.

The rod and line has to be spot on if one is to learn how to cast, you should feel the rod loading, that is the weight of the line bending the tip of the rod.
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
I was self taught, but then (pretty late in life) I discovered there was such a thing as fly casting as a sport. Once I got into this I quickly came to the realisation that I'd have been a much better caster If I'd of had lessons right from the off. These days I've probably had more lessons (albeit informal) than most, plus I spend more time practicing than the majority. This seems to have paid off as I'm not too bad now, even if I say so myself.

When my other half started fly fishing she went straight for lessons - she's pretty handy with a fly rod too :cool:
Understatement if there ever was one!
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
The op does state he does not have money for lessons and could just about put a cast together, hence my advice to practice at the water.
In his scenario I still think that's the best place for him practise.

Al
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
In that case, go to a water where people are already fly fishing and ask around for advice, there is always someone who will help you out.
I would be wary of asking anyone. There were only a handful or less who could cast well in my old club and there were plenty willing to advise when they weren't qualified to do so.
Go to You Tube and look at Bill Gammel's videos, they are good, especially if you are religious ;)
 

Dominikk85

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
96
Location
Frankfurt
Really once you can cast 35 feet somewhat accurately you will catch fish if you move stealthy enough.

However with better casting technique it will be more fun and you will catch more fish. Also you will cast with less effort, get less exhausted and you will save your joints (especially shoulder), so long term better technique pays off and is more fun.

Ideally you get an instructor but obviously the next 2+ months that won't really work likely due to the virus. You could also upload video.

That being said there are guys with terrible casting technique who catches lots of fish due to moving stealthy, knowing spots and the right flies who can get close enough to reach them without spooking them. to me that is not ideal but for many that is ok.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
At the risk of being accused of self-interest, £70 or so on a casting lesson pales into insignificance over then cost of tackle, flies, tickets and travel for a years fly fishing and is possibly one of the best investments you'll make as an angler. Fire away...
Without any self interest I agree, there's no doubt casting lessons are the way to go that's set in stone but the op stated its not a option.

Al

Al
 
Top