Looking for casting advice

PaulD

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I was self taught, but . . .

When my other half started fly fishing she went straight for lessons - she's pretty handy with a fly rod too :cool:
It's a funny thing . . . when you deliver casting instruction at shows like the CLA, you do find that a lot of women like to 'try their hand'. Generally, they are a delight! They listen, they follow direction and suggestion without 'affront' and never consider that the horizon is a distance to overcome.
 

GEK79

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You won't go far wrong with the advice from watching a few of Joan Wulff's videos...




A few to get you started. Good luck. (y)
That is the lady my dad told me to watch. Didn't the Americans change the rules to men only when she won the fly cast distance competition..
.
 

BobP

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Answer the following questions:-

Would you learn a golf swing by just walking out on a golf course with a couple of clubs?

Would you learn to drive by just getting in a car and switching on the ignition?

Would you learn to shoot by just going out, gun in hand?

If the answer to the above is NO then apply that to learning to cast. A couple of hours of tuition is worth more than a week of frustration at the waterside.
 

Jeltz

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Answer the following questions:-

Would you learn a golf swing by just walking out on a golf course with a couple of clubs?

Would you learn to drive by just getting in a car and switching on the ignition?

Would you learn to shoot by just going out, gun in hand?

If the answer to the above is NO then apply that to learning to cast. A couple of hours of tuition is worth more than a week of frustration at the waterside.
I have done all 3 and yes, I did learn.

I have had informal tuition from 2 very good fly anglers, one was an Orvis guide the other managed a fishery, and found the lessons to be vague at best. I went to a BFCC fly casting show in Reading, again I was not impressed at the level of instruction even though those guys were qualified instructors.

Can you really learn to cast properly after a 1 hour lesson?
 

PaulD

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I have done all 3 and yes, I did learn.

I have had informal tuition from 2 very good fly anglers, one was an Orvis guide the other managed a fishery, and found the lessons to be vague at best.

. . . and were they qualified instructors?


I went to a BFCC fly casting show in Reading, again I was not impressed at the level of instruction even though those guys were qualified instructors.

. . . and had you booked a lesson and had a conversation about what you were trying to achieve or a problem you felt you had?

Can you really learn to cast properly after a 1 hour lesson?

No . . . but you can be set in the right direction, be made aware of the key principles and actions and leave with knowledge of things you need to practice and exercises of how to practice them.
 

andygrey

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[QUOTE="Jeltz, post: 2717535, member: 4736"

Can you really learn to cast properly after a 1 hour lesson?
[/QUOTE]

Nope, and I don't think any instructor worth their salt would claim this to be teh case. But what you CAN do in a hour or two is teach the basics and give someone some useful practice drills to take away with them. A lot of the time people don't know what they are doing wrong and a lesson isn't an instant magic-bullet but can help set them on the right course for improvement and give them some knowledge and tools for practicing.
 

Jeltz

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I thought my post was clear on the instruction I have had in the past. I can cast well enough to fish a chalk stream, I know I would struggle a bit casting a full line on a reservoir with a team of buzzers on the end of a bung.
 

BobP

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I have done all 3 and yes, I did learn.

I have had informal tuition from 2 very good fly anglers, one was an Orvis guide the other managed a fishery, and found the lessons to be vague at best. I went to a BFCC fly casting show in Reading, again I was not impressed at the level of instruction even though those guys were qualified instructors.

Can you really learn to cast properly after a 1 hour lesson?
You can learn to put a line out a few yards reasonably well after an hour the same as you can waggle a golf club or make a car go a few yards. After two hours things should start to come together and then it is practice, practice and a bit more practice.

Casting an indicator 20 yards out on Farmoor is easy enough. Putting a small dry 20 yards across the Test and dropping it on target isn't. Precision isn't needed for the former but is for the latter. A 10' #5 rod is used for the former against a 9' #4 for the latter. Fortunately I've been doing it for long enough that I can do both.
 

Secret Angler

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I used to find it very easy to learn to cast on a lawn. On the bank, however ... That's when you learn that trees can move.
 

anzac

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One suggestion here. Have a mate or your spouse video your cast and the compare it some of the many instructive casting videos on YouTube.
 

lakesman

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That Lee Cummings video is very useful; very similar to an exercise advocated by Joan Wolff. Whilst on the subject of her exercises, one of her best is to continuously reduce casting power until the cast collapses, in order to demonstrate just how little effort is actually needed to put a line out.
Reckon value varies from person to person, but generally the Joan Wolff stuff is good, and so is Ed Jaworowski, the latter especially for analysing ones mistakes. For more intermediate casters I would recommend John F Field’s “Fly-Casting Finesse“. But most books/videos invariably add something, even if tiny, to ones skill/knowledge.
For a beginner, a professional instructor can be well worth the expense, but experience suggests that whilst all can teach, not all can identify and correct mistakes, so correct choice of instructor is paramount if fault analysis is the main requirement.
 

ohanzee

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I think it is common to have a huge expectation and irrational impatience when someone first sets out to learn, it can be difficult to explain that the level they can expect to reach in a couple of lessons is a long way from the image in their head, I think many get annoyed by that.
 

Jeltz

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It’s a bit like trying to teach someone to play chess, all masters are pretty good at playing the game, but their teaching skills leave a lot to be desired. I think teaching is a skill in itself, you either have it or you haven’t.
That Lee Cummings video is very useful; very similar to an exercise advocated by Joan Wolff. Whilst on the subject of her exercises, one of her best is to continuously reduce casting power until the cast collapses, in order to demonstrate just how little effort is actually needed to put a line out.
Reckon value varies from person to person, but generally the Joan Wolff stuff is good, and so is Ed Jaworowski, the latter especially for analysing ones mistakes. For more intermediate casters I would recommend John F Field’s “Fly-Casting Finesse“. But most books/videos invariably add something, even if tiny, to ones skill/knowledge.
For a beginner, a professional instructor can be well worth the expense, but experience suggests that whilst all can teach, not all can identify and correct mistakes, so correct choice of instructor is paramount if fault analysis is the main requirement.
 

fishing hobo

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For a beginner, a professional instructor can be well worth the expense, but experience suggests that whilst all can teach, not all can identify and correct mistakes, so correct choice of instructor is paramount if fault analysis is the main requirement.
One needs to be trained to recognise the mistake(s) and then know how to correct the mistake. FFI instructors should be able to do this as it is in the syllabus and exam.
 

tangled

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With Covid and no money our OP has little choice but to watch videos, practice on playing fields and just get onto the water and give it a go. Nothing wrong with that at all.

Of course getting at lest one lesson would be best to get the basic principles but it's not essential by any means.

For what it's worth, I think the very best value way to start is to find a local guide that is also a qualified instructor and have a whole day fishing with him. That way you get both casting and fishing instruction and a whole day of help in both.

W
One needs to be trained to recognise the mistake(s) and then know how to correct the mistake. FFI instructors should be able to do this as it is in the syllabus and exam.
 

anzac

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With Covid and no money our OP has little choice but to watch videos, practice on playing fields and just get onto the water and give it a go. Nothing wrong with that at all.

Of course getting at lest one lesson would be best to get the basic principles but it's not essential by any means. ...

W
I agree that the best option is lessons from a trained, professional instructor.

Given the circumstances, the pandemic and a lack of disposable income, I believe videoing oneself, reviewing it, and comparing it to the better YouTube offerings is the next best option. After all the technique is used by professional athletes (cricket, golf,and tennis) to perfect their strokes.
 

PaulD

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. . . I believe videoing oneself, reviewing it, and comparing it to the better YouTube offerings is the next best option.
One of the great difficulties in being 'self-taught' is the fact that you get a very limited view of what you are doing and the effect it's having on your cast - half of it happens behind you, most of it is above head height, your predominant view is down the line on the forward cast - and when you consider that many problems with the cast are a reflection of what's going on in the back cast . . . not being able to see it is a real problem.

If you spend time with an instructor you'll more than likely find that he/she will observe your cast from a variety of angles, looking at your hand, arm and shoulder movements, foot position, tracking etc from the front, side and back. Being able to video yourself is a good idea, preferably from the side, front and back . . . it can be very revealing, shocking even - much like listening to a recording of yourself public speaking!
 
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