Mass Starling deaths

diawl bach

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Signs and marvels, the coming judgement. Frogs next, mark my words.
 

spudgun

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It does have an apocalyptic feel about it, what with floods, global warming, brexit, trump. I found another article about mass starling deaths, this one is from Holland the other year, the conclusion was that they were spooked by something then flew into each other or the ground with such force to kill them. Although several birds tested had toxins in their systems that were associated with Yew seeds.

Cause of mass deaths of starlings in the Hague identified – Holland Times

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diawl bach

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Interesting, thanks for that link. Apocalyptic is the word, particularly given that the corpses were confined to the road.

It made me wonder if they'd been killed somehow and dumped along the road as something like that - but not on this scale - happens locally. I noticed a badger had been run over outside the village one lunchtime which was odd because when I'd driven out in the morning it hadn't been there. When I remarked on it later a dairyman I know told me it's common practice to shoot them and dump them on the road later to get rid of the corpse and remove suspicion by making the death look accidental.

It'll be interesting to see what the postmortem comes up with.
 

williegunn

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Are there any Grouse Moors near by, the RSPB will lay the blame there.

Are Yew seeds hallucinogenic, I seem to remember if you lay under a yew tree in the hot sun you could get high, which is why they are in graveyards??
 

spudgun

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I have a theory with badger's, that in winter nutrients, minerals, trace elements, are hard to come by and that badger's etc will scoff up the rock salt that's used to keep the roads free of ice. There is also a benefit of worms being brought to the surface. Nature also has ancient by ways used for hundreds of years by animals to navigate the countryside, then a dirty great road is slapped down, vehicles increase in volume each year. I do appreciate that several hundred badger's are dumped on the roads to cover up any crime.
I think Yew trees were planted on graves as part of a pagan ritual, then churches were built around the same grounds.
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diawl bach

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Are Yew seeds hallucinogenic, I seem to remember if you lay under a yew tree in the hot sun you could get high, which is why they are in graveyards??

There's no correlation between psychoactive substances and a graveyard location :p

Try a few berries and let us know how it goes though!

My Mrs is off a farm (not a sheep I hasten to add) and her theory is that churches didn't have to maintain fencing around graveyards if they planted yews as they're poisonous to stock.

On the other hand yews are incredibly long lived and evergreen and may well have played a part in pagan rituals preceding Christianity which the church muscled in on.
 

mebu

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There's no correlation between psychoactive substances and a graveyard location :p

Try a few berries and let us know how it goes though!

My Mrs is off a farm (not a sheep I hasten to add) and her theory is that churches didn't have to maintain fencing around graveyards if they planted yews as they're poisonous to stock.

On the other hand yews are incredibly long lived and evergreen and may well have played a part in pagan rituals preceding Christianity which the church muscled in on.
Yes they are also very slow growing which was always thought a benefit in maintaining churchyards.
 

redietz

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I have a theory with badger's, that in winter nutrients, minerals, trace elements, are hard to come by and that badger's etc will scoff up the rock salt that's used to keep the roads free of ice.

I don't know about badgers, but deer definitely do this. It's not unusual to see a number of deer appearing to be grazing in the road in front of my house (they're actually licking salt.) Of course, there are always deer corpses along the road, but they were clearly hit by motorists.
 

spudgun

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Definitely most animals need these minerals, elements especially in winter. The sparrow's have over the years nearly eaten away a stone from a wall on my house. They seem to go for the darkest of stones obviously they are getting something from this one type of stone. The other year we found something had been grazing on the bark from the bottom of Beech trees in woods that were planted around thirty years ago, I set up a wildlife camera and found it to be fallow deer, to help with the problem we put down horse salt licks, these worked a treat, the deer left the tree's alone long enough for spring to arrive and natural supplements to grow.
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bobmiddlepoint

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According to a report in the Mirror (what I saw online) they flew into the ground.

"A spokesman for the Department [DEFRA] said: "The laboratory's view is that blunt force trauma is the main cause."
The spokesman added that virology, bacteriology and histopathology tests had all been carried out.
Bird flu had been ruled out and there was "no evidence of infectious diseases”."

"Police said at the time that the incident that it was a "complete mystery", and during the course of their investigations they heard that it may have happened before on the island.
The rural crime team said that the most likely explanation was that the flock had taken evasive action - probably to avoid a predator such as a bird of prey - and that some of them had slammed into the ground as their murmuration changed course."


So there you go, a simple air traffic control mistake. Not sure I'm convinced but I have nothing better!


Andy
 

loxie

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According to a report in the Mirror (what I saw online) they flew into the ground.

"A spokesman for the Department [DEFRA] said: "The laboratory's view is that blunt force trauma is the main cause."
The spokesman added that virology, bacteriology and histopathology tests had all been carried out.
Bird flu had been ruled out and there was "no evidence of infectious diseases”."

"Police said at the time that the incident that it was a "complete mystery", and during the course of their investigations they heard that it may have happened before on the island.
The rural crime team said that the most likely explanation was that the flock had taken evasive action - probably to avoid a predator such as a bird of prey - and that some of them had slammed into the ground as their murmuration changed course."


So there you go, a simple air traffic control mistake. Not sure I'm convinced but I have nothing better!


Andy

They probably read the Brexit thread and commuted mass suicide.
 
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