Maxcatch

Rhithrogena

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Great result for the Maxcatch Extreme, I do like mine a lot, and I’ve many other much more expensive rods, just goes to show.
S.
Seconded. I have a natty green Extreme 8'6" #4 and it is a real 'tool rod'. Casts really well, is light, and was totally unfazed by a proper wild 20" carp. Good at 10x the price, methinks (I paid £18 for it).
 

Vintage Badger

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Personally, I think, as with many items, they are selling to vanity and not need or ability, but I am just a poor, some would say, tight fisted Scotsman, I mean, £1300 for a Hardy rod and £850 for a Hardy reel? What does that really get you?
I'm sure this topic will have been covered at least several times by now on this forum, if not then it should have been as it's an obvious target!

Just as some people are happy to travel from A to B in a budget car (and are happier still if it's a company vehicle they don't have to pay for at all), some others like to do it in a Bently, Range Rover, Ferrari, top of the range BWM or Audi, etc. The start point and destination are the same, the quality of the driving experience is open to debate, and individual preference and available money will most likely determine the expenditure in that respect.

Whilst I very much appreciate quality and craftsmanship, as single handed trout rods go, I'd spend more money on the rod than the reel, as the vast majority of the time I play the fish on the line, not on the reel; so, for me, the reel is pretty much just a line holder. Even if I were a multi-millionaire I very much doubt I'd pay more than a couple of hundred pounds for a trout reel, as I've never been into 'bling' for the sake of it. However, in that finanical situation, I would probably be willing to pay more for a salmon reel where the drag system and overall durability is likely to be challenged by the fish and the conditions I'm trying to catch them in.

As for rods, it doesn't matter how much a rod costs, if it doesn't suit my casting style and ability (and I can't easily change those two to suit the rod) then I'd be throwing my money away, be that £35 or £1,000+. Paying either of those sums won't help you if you can't get on with the rod. Get it right (try before you buy!) and the rod will be a pleasure to use... and, as the saying goes, the quality is often remembered long after the price has been forgottten.
 

keef68

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The Extreme didn't do quite as well? Don't you mean it came last overall (accuracy and longshot)? ;)


Well I did say that it did well at distance - it was third overall. Never had one, but bear in mind it’s a £20 rod that was up against rods at many times the price.

Keith


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Vintage Badger

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Well I did say that it did well at distance - it was third overall. Never had one, but bear in mind it’s a £20 rod that was up against rods at many times the price.

Keith


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Yes, and bear in mind that, according to that test, it wasn't very accurate at the average range most people would be using a rod of that size and #weight for. There's a big difference between a casting rod and a fishing rod.

Also, as far as I can tell, it's not a £20 rod if you buy it from a UK retailer and pay the correct duty and tax on it... after all, we really do need to pay for the NHS, etc. as, unfortunately, clapping and banging pans on the doorstep on a Thursday evening for a few weeks doesn't do it.
 
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Tangled

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We get that result time after time don't we? The emperor generally has no knickers.
 

keef68

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Yes, and bear in mind that, according to that test, it wasn't very accurate at the average range most people would be using a rod of that size and #weight for. There's a big difference between a casting rod and a fishing rod.

Also, as far as I can tell, it's not a £20 rod if you buy it from a UK retailer and pay the correct duty and tax on it... after all, we really do need to pay for the NHS, etc. as, unfortunately, clapping and banging pans on the doorstep on a Thursday evening for a few weeks doesn't do it.

So it’s either a £20 rod, or a £35 rod. Hardly worth the debate you seem to want to have about it. If you don’t want one don’t buy it. I won’t be either. Regardless of any of that, it was an interesting shootout that didn’t involve an hour of listening to so called “professionals” debating a large selection of £900 rods to find the one that made them come in their pants.


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Vintage Badger

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So it’s either a £20 rod, or a £35 rod. Hardly worth the debate you seem to want to have about it. If you don’t want one don’t buy it. I won’t be either. Regardless of any of that, it was an interesting shootout that didn’t involve an hour of listening to so called “professionals” debating a large selection of £900 rods to find the one that made them come in their pants.


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Hey, don't shoot the messenger.
 

Segami

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I'm sure this topic will have been covered at least several times by now on this forum, if not then it should have been as it's an obvious target!

Just as some people are happy to travel from A to B in a budget car (and are happier still if it's a company vehicle they don't have to pay for at all), some others like to do it in a Bently, Range Rover, Ferrari, top of the range BWM or Audi, etc. The start point and destination are the same, the quality of the driving experience is open to debate, and individual preference and available money will most likely determine the expenditure in that respect.

Whilst I very much appreciate quality and craftsmanship, as single handed trout rods go, I'd spend more money on the rod than the reel, as the vast majority of the time I play the fish on the line, not on the reel; so, for me, the reel is pretty much just a line holder. Even if I were a multi-millionaire I very much doubt I'd pay more than a couple of hundred pounds for a trout reel, as I've never been into 'bling' for the sake of it. However, in that finanical situation, I would probably be willing to pay more for a salmon reel where the drag system and overall durability is likely to be challenged by the fish and the conditions I'm trying to catch them in.

As for rods, it doesn't matter how much a rod costs, if it doesn't suit my casting style and ability (and I can't easily change those two to suit the rod) then I'd be throwing my money away, be that £35 or £1,000+. Paying either of those sums won't help you if you can't get on with the rod. Get it right (try before you buy!) and the rod will be a pleasure to use... and, as the saying goes, the quality is often remembered long after the price has been forgottten.
I would agree about the reel and drag system if you fish for the larger fish, Salmon, etc, but for the Trout that most catch I would again agree that a reel is just a line holder.
 

Vintage Badger

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I would agree about the reel and drag system if you fish for the larger fish, Salmon, etc, but for the Trout that most catch I would again agree that a reel is just a line holder.
Thanks for your agreement. To put the record straight though, I wouldn't criticise anyone that wants to buy an expensive reel (or rod) if they can afford it and it gives them pleasure (and that pleasure isn't taken at anyone else's expense).
 

Rhithrogena

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I looked through all their rods and they don't have one single 9 ft 6 in 6-weight with a reversed half-Wells handle.
Aye they do! The famous Extreme - it'll cost you £26 mind 😉
Scroll down past all the 9' ers to #5 and #6 9'6" jobs and #7 and #8 10' ers too!
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Aye they do! The famous Extreme - it'll cost you £26 mind 😉
Scroll down past all the 9' ers to #5 and #6 9'6" jobs and #7 and #8 10' ers too!

Thanks - it's a bit outside my budget. But I suppose you get a free fly line with it. 😜
 

Gdog

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Thanks - it's a bit outside my budget. But I suppose you get a free fly line with it. 😜
Col, I'd be careful buying the extreme 6 weight, look at the review for the 9' # 6 on post 2684, it came last. It probably has a very heavy swing weight too.
I bought a cheap 7 weight a few months ago, I didnt want to risk breaking one of my good rods slinging gold heads. It might be OK for a weight lifter, I measured its swing weight.... 17 oz. It only cost me €28, so not bothered.
 

shortcircuit

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If you are going for a six weight you might be better off getting the Black Star or something in that range seemingly it is very good, some of the stillwater lads have them and speak highly of them
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Col, I'd be careful buying the extreme 6 weight, look at the review for the 9' # 6 on post 2684, it came last. It probably has a very heavy swing weight too.
I bought a cheap 7 weight a few months ago, I didnt want to risk breaking one of my good rods slinging gold heads. It might be OK for a weight lifter, I measured its swing weight.... 17 oz. It only cost me €28, so not bothered.

Thanks for your concern, but 'tis OK - I was just kidding about buying one. 🤭
 

kingf000

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The Extreme didn't do quite as well? Don't you mean it came last overall (accuracy and longshot)? ;)

These shootouts are good and confirm that paying more for a rod doesn't necessarily give you a better rod. I believe the Fenwick Aetos is the same as the old Greys XF2? However, they are comparing a very cheap Maxcatch starter rod with very much more expensive rods. It would be interesting to compare a Maxcatch rod closer in price but still much cheaper, such as the Professional range.
 

Rhithrogena

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Col, I'd be careful buying the extreme 6 weight, look at the review for the 9' # 6 on post 2684, it came last. It probably has a very heavy swing weight too.
I bought a cheap 7 weight a few months ago, I didnt want to risk breaking one of my good rods slinging gold heads. It might be OK for a weight lifter, I measured its swing weight.... 17 oz. It only cost me €28, so not bothered.
Care is needed with the whole concept of swing weight. Less isn't necessarily more. A heavy swing weight is a benefit for distance (hence lead tape being so popular for adding to golf clubs). There are trade-offs with accuracy but with a shorter 'swing' being used for shorter casts, where accuracy is most important, the effect is not huge.
And, yes, this is personal to each of us. Sadly it is increasingly difficult to try rods out before purchase, which is the only way to seee if they suit you.
I am slowly upgrading my old fly rods but some favourites from the 80's have high swing weights by modern standards. They cast long lines extremely well and mid-distance ones accurately, which make them great stillwater rods.
Overall I suggest swing weight isn't something to judge a rod by without casting it too.
 

Gdog

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Care is needed with the whole concept of swing weight. Less isn't necessarily more. A heavy swing weight is a benefit for distance (hence lead tape being so popular for adding to golf clubs). There are trade-offs with accuracy but with a shorter 'swing' being used for shorter casts, where accuracy is most important, the effect is not huge.
And, yes, this is personal to each of us. Sadly it is increasingly difficult to try rods out before purchase, which is the only way to seee if they suit you.
I am slowly upgrading my old fly rods but some favourites from the 80's have high swing weights by modern standards. They cast long lines extremely well and mid-distance ones accurately, which make them great stillwater rods.
Overall I suggest swing weight isn't something to judge a rod by without casting it too.

To put this rod in to perspective, I checked the swing weight of my Greys GR60, same line weight and length, it had a swing weight of 12 oz, which is 5 oz. less than the other rod an Obei Emerald.

I had a sore arm and shoulder after casting the Obei, I don't think anyone would enjoy casting it, unless they are a 25 year old weight lifter.

It only cost €28, so no big loss.
 

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