More Free Fly Tying Material.

The Endrick Spider

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Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
224
Location
Milton of Campsie
The woods and fields are saturated therefore there are not going to be any long walks with the dogs just yet. The plan was to take them through the wood in front of the house and then around the perimeter of the Clydesdale horses two fields. I always give the horses a carrot but at the same time have to keep an eye on the dogs for they think that it is their job to round them up. The 3 horses were at the furthest away possible part of the field and as I approached them could see one had a problem, it had been stuck all night on the fence. It had its front two legs stuck between the sheep fence and the barbed wire part of the fence at the top. I knew the farmer was away and the owner of the horses was at work so it was going to be up to me to free him. The first thing was to get the dogs out the way therefore not having any leads with me they were put in the next field. Eying up the situation I could see that this was not going to be an easy job. I first tried getting him to lift his huge foot and as I bent down could feel his nostrils on my neck. It would not be the first time I have been lifted off the ground by a horse that I was trying to help. The heat off his breath was unbelievable, just like using a hair drier. This was not going to be any good so the plan now was to lift out 3 fence posts to slacken the wire but then visualised the other two horses getting out so I used Tweed to drive them away. Once the posts were out I managed to free both his legs and then away he went none the worse. Posts back in my reward for this, loads and loads of free fly tying material stuck on the fence. Having loads of horse hair there will be a few Geoffrey Bucknall's Footballers tied this winter.
Having mentioned fly tying, having arthritis in my wrists and hands I do struggle a bit when it comes to tying flies but I am nowhere near as bad as some poor souls that you see for I don't have any pain whatsoever. I was struggling badly just trying to make up my winter two fly casts which has got me thinking that I will soon have to change to fishing a single fly. At least I don't have a problem fly fishing. I was going to say that I will make a start bung fishing to reduce the amount of casting that I do but this is something I have been doing for years without even realising it. I have been using a deer hair sedge as a bung but cant see them anymore. The next thing on the agenda is to make my own bungs with cork out of bottles that my grandson will get me from his place of work. Something else for nothing, every little helps.
 

shortcircuit

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Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
441
The woods and fields are saturated therefore there are not going to be any long walks with the dogs just yet. The plan was to take them through the wood in front of the house and then around the perimeter of the Clydesdale horses two fields. I always give the horses a carrot but at the same time have to keep an eye on the dogs for they think that it is their job to round them up. The 3 horses were at the furthest away possible part of the field and as I approached them could see one had a problem, it had been stuck all night on the fence. It had its front two legs stuck between the sheep fence and the barbed wire part of the fence at the top. I knew the farmer was away and the owner of the horses was at work so it was going to be up to me to free him. The first thing was to get the dogs out the way therefore not having any leads with me they were put in the next field. Eying up the situation I could see that this was not going to be an easy job. I first tried getting him to lift his huge foot and as I bent down could feel his nostrils on my neck. It would not be the first time I have been lifted off the ground by a horse that I was trying to help. The heat off his breath was unbelievable, just like using a hair drier. This was not going to be any good so the plan now was to lift out 3 fence posts to slacken the wire but then visualised the other two horses getting out so I used Tweed to drive them away. Once the posts were out I managed to free both his legs and then away he went none the worse. Posts back in my reward for this, loads and loads of free fly tying material stuck on the fence. Having loads of horse hair there will be a few Geoffrey Bucknall's Footballers tied this winter.
Having mentioned fly tying, having arthritis in my wrists and hands I do struggle a bit when it comes to tying flies but I am nowhere near as bad as some poor souls that you see for I don't have any pain whatsoever. I was struggling badly just trying to make up my winter two fly casts which has got me thinking that I will soon have to change to fishing a single fly. At least I don't have a problem fly fishing. I was going to say that I will make a start bung fishing to reduce the amount of casting that I do but this is something I have been doing for years without even realising it. I have been using a deer hair sedge as a bung but cant see them anymore. The next thing on the agenda is to make my own bungs with cork out of bottles that my grandson will get me from his place of work. Something else for nothing, every little helps.

Well that is definitely your good deed for the day, well done.

I actually was in the same mind as you in using cork as a bung. I have been using the cork from a wine bottle, cut in half halfway down. I then "painted" it using some bright orange highlighter.

Works great to suspend the flies and is very easy to see, but it is very tough to cast on a breezy day, it is extremely wind resistant. I would think you would need a 7 wt line at the least to cast it if the wind is up
 

The Endrick Spider

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
224
Location
Milton of Campsie
Well that is definitely your good deed for the day, well done.

I actually was in the same mind as you in using cork as a bung. I have been using the cork from a wine bottle, cut in half halfway down. I then "painted" it using some bright orange highlighter.

Works great to suspend the flies and is very easy to see, but it is very tough to cast on a breezy day, it is extremely wind resistant. I would think you would need a 7 wt line at the least to cast it if the wind is up
Thanks for that reply. Never gave casting them much thought because I used Hugh Falkus surface lures for over 30 years that I made from cork and managed to cast them no bother. That was with a 7 weight floating line but the cast was 8lb breaking strain. I now use a 6 weight and 6 or 4lb cast for trout. I might still get away with it for although my actual cast is lightweight I use the first 6 feet of a tapered big butt leader that is nail knotted to my fly line. The first few feet must be about 10lb breaking strain which should help with the casting. Anyway will see what happens, I have not got any corks yet. I had better be very careful what I am saying here for I don't want the postman arriving with parcels of corks from all over the country like what happened when I mentioned collecting the red rubber bands that the postman threw away in one of my articles.
 

BobP

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Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,599
Location
Wiltshire
Got any sheep up your way? Sheep wool is about as good as it gets for indicators. I have been using it for years attached New Zealand style. Easy to cast and doesn't stick out like a sore d**k out on the water.

Amazon Prime for 2m of 1mm id silicone tubing for a fiver to attach the wool to the leader. Keep it simple.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
The woods and fields are saturated therefore there are not going to be any long walks with the dogs just yet. The plan was to take them through the wood in front of the house and then around the perimeter of the Clydesdale horses two fields. I always give the horses a carrot but at the same time have to keep an eye on the dogs for they think that it is their job to round them up. The 3 horses were at the furthest away possible part of the field and as I approached them could see one had a problem, it had been stuck all night on the fence. It had its front two legs stuck between the sheep fence and the barbed wire part of the fence at the top. I knew the farmer was away and the owner of the horses was at work so it was going to be up to me to free him. The first thing was to get the dogs out the way therefore not having any leads with me they were put in the next field. Eying up the situation I could see that this was not going to be an easy job. I first tried getting him to lift his huge foot and as I bent down could feel his nostrils on my neck. It would not be the first time I have been lifted off the ground by a horse that I was trying to help. The heat off his breath was unbelievable, just like using a hair drier. This was not going to be any good so the plan now was to lift out 3 fence posts to slacken the wire but then visualised the other two horses getting out so I used Tweed to drive them away. Once the posts were out I managed to free both his legs and then away he went none the worse. Posts back in my reward for this, loads and loads of free fly tying material stuck on the fence. Having loads of horse hair there will be a few Geoffrey Bucknall's Footballers tied this winter.
Having mentioned fly tying, having arthritis in my wrists and hands I do struggle a bit when it comes to tying flies but I am nowhere near as bad as some poor souls that you see for I don't have any pain whatsoever. I was struggling badly just trying to make up my winter two fly casts which has got me thinking that I will soon have to change to fishing a single fly. At least I don't have a problem fly fishing. I was going to say that I will make a start bung fishing to reduce the amount of casting that I do but this is something I have been doing for years without even realising it. I have been using a deer hair sedge as a bung but cant see them anymore. The next thing on the agenda is to make my own bungs with cork out of bottles that my grandson will get me from his place of work. Something else for nothing, every little helps.
Nice Txt describing how you saved horses and benefited your self. Good on you "The Endrick Spider".

Neil.
 

The Endrick Spider

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
224
Location
Milton of Campsie
Nice Txt describing how you saved horses and benefited your self. Good on you "The Endrick Spider".

Neil.
Thanks for that Neil.
What I forgot to add to that was that I later notified the farmer telling him that he would have to go out and make the fence more secure. He said that that would not be a problem for he has got certificates for fencing. I said to him that going by the state of the fence, the certificates that you have got, they must be for sword fencing. He was not best pleased.

John.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
Thanks for that Neil.
What I forgot to add to that was that I later notified the farmer telling him that he would have to go out and make the fence more secure. He said that that would not be a problem for he has got certificates for fencing. I said to him that going by the state of the fence, the certificates that you have got, they must be for sword fencing. He was not best pleased.

John.
Good for you John.

Neil.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
Got any sheep up your way? Sheep wool is about as good as it gets for indicators. I have been using it for years attached New Zealand style. Easy to cast and doesn't stick out like a sore d**k out on the water.

Amazon Prime for 2m of 1mm id silicone tubing for a fiver to attach the wool to the leader. Keep it simple.
Up my way sheep are so many, so I need to pay attention on fencing.

Thanks BobP

Neil.
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,599
Location
Wiltshire
Up my way sheep are so many, so I need to pay attention on fencing.

Thanks BobP

Neil.
There you are then. Endless supply of free indicator material. Where I take my dogs for a run sometimes in the summer is a barn in which the local shepherd stacks a lot of those large bags that sand & gravel come in. These ones are full of wool after the sheep have had their annual haircut. I take the view that as the wool is basically worthless these days the shepherd isn't going to miss a good double handful and that's me sorted for the next year.
 

The Endrick Spider

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
224
Location
Milton of Campsie
Got any sheep up your way? Sheep wool is about as good as it gets for indicators. I have been using it for years attached New Zealand style. Easy to cast and doesn't stick out like a sore d**k out on the water.

Amazon Prime for 2m of 1mm id silicone tubing for a fiver to attach the wool to the leader. Keep it simple.
Is it the wool of the ewe or the tup for there is a difference? I am surrounded with sheep, horses, roe deer, pheasants and hares but no rabbits. We have the roe deer and pheasants in the front garden. The roe deer eat my wife's plants and I feed the pheasants with barley. Went into the house to get some more barley and the pheasants followed me into the house. I showed a photograph of the pheasants coming into the house to the estate owner and he did his nut at the thought of me feeding them. He probably thought that they were going to end up in the pot. In my younger days that would have been the case for times were tough but there is no need to go back to living off the land. I knew how to catch most things which included getting pheasants drunk, drowning mallard ducks and blindfolding greylag geese and selecting the ones for the pot letting the others go. It was all to provide food for the table, not for profit.
There is no need for me to collect sheep's wool for making indicators but thanks for the advice which is very much appreciated. Since that Post I have came up with my own style of bungs for as I keep on saying there is no such thing as waste for everything has got another use. I had a Post somewhere where I mentioned that I came across these rubber type mats that were being thrown out, the type that lock into one another and are used for kids play areas. They are red, blue, yellow and green. I found a use for them right away where I cut them up with a Stanley knife and made them into cast carriers where the flies can be sunk into the rubber out of the way. All of these bits that lock into one another like a jigsaw that were cut off and were going to be thrown away, these have now been rounded off, had a hole drilled through them and a lightweight longshank hook inserted and have now become my bungs. They will be attached to the cast by the eye, the hook part is inserted into the bung to keep it secure. They will float for ever and no need for any painting job either.
I am always coming up with something for saving me money but never anything for making me any. It must be a bit of the inventor that is in me that runs in the family. My Great Uncle was Harry Pickup who invented Harpic and became a millionaire.
 

BobP

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Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,599
Location
Wiltshire
Interesting bit of family history there. Not many can claim to have a millionaire inventor in their background.

As far as the sex of the sheep that "donate" my indicator wool is concerned, I have no idea but suspect that they are ewes. I certainly have no desire or intention of trying to approach a ram with a pair of scissors in hand in order to get some wool off his wedding tackle. I'm keen on my fly tying, but not THAT keen.

Due to my winter sporting activities I have access to all the ducks, pheasants and partridges I am ever likely to need for "mining" free materials. In fact, I once wrote an article for Fly Fishing and Fly Tying magazine on that very topic. "Materials for Free". Basically how to get them. I got thoroughly castigated by an aquaintance in the tackle trade for my pains.
 

Paul_B

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Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
5,972
Location
West Riding of Yorkshire
Is it the wool of the ewe or the tup for there is a difference? "snip"

Theyre the same,
Natural wool contains lanolin, this makes the wool feel waxy and makes it sheds water (makes it waterproof) ideal for bungs or fly making, in the past the lanolin wax was used by some as a fly floatant.

More useless information,
This waxy lanolin had to be removed before wool processing and dyeing, the person who removed the lanolin was called a Fuller, using a material we call fullers earth.

Sebum is the oil on human hair and birds have preen oil from the preen gland, all need removing before dying (if you want to do a proper job).
 

The Endrick Spider

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
224
Location
Milton of Campsie
Interesting bit of family history there. Not many can claim to have a millionaire inventor in their background.

As far as the sex of the sheep that "donate" my indicator wool is concerned, I have no idea but suspect that they are ewes. I certainly have no desire or intention of trying to approach a ram with a pair of scissors in hand in order to get some wool off his wedding tackle. I'm keen on my fly tying, but not THAT keen.

Due to my winter sporting activities I have access to all the ducks, pheasants and partridges I am ever likely to need for "mining" free materials. In fact, I once wrote an article for Fly Fishing and Fly Tying magazine on that very topic. "Materials for Free". Basically how to get them. I got thoroughly castigated by an aquaintance in the tackle trade for my pains.
There is always plenty of sheep's wool going about in the fields and you do not have to enter the fields when the sheep are in them to collect it. The farmers are always shifting their sheep about to rest the fields that they were in. There have been many a sheep I have shifted about myself when looking after a hill farm when the farmer was away on holiday but these are ones that had escaped from the field they were in. Do not be mistaken into thinking that I know anything about farming or working with sheep for I don't, it was his 8 dogs I was mostly looking after. Having said that, I do know all of the commands that are used and if you saw me driving the sheep back to where they belong you would think that I was an expert dog handler. I take no credit, it was all down to the dogs, they were brilliant. According to the farmer, from the day it is born a sheep's purpose in life seems to be finding different ways of killing itself.
Every time I got a new Border collie off the farm, for the first few months it had to sleep out in an empty section of my pigeon loft for it stank of sheep. When on the farm a lot of its bedding was made up of sheep's wool. It did not matter how many baths you gave it it took ages to get rid of the smell. I hear people saying that if their dog rolls in deer dung they can't get rid of the smell. I have never had a dog guilty of doing that but what you have to do is rub tomato sauce on the area first before washing.
Regarding your shooting activities, I have attended many shoots in my day, collected plenty of feathers but have not seen a partridge in 30 years up here and neither has the farmer. I have written in a Post somewhere before that I get the greatest satisfaction catching fish on a fly where apart from the hook all the other materials for making it came free. Once the fly is no longer of any use I even strip it down and recycle the hook.
Regarding my great uncle being a millionaire, when he died non of the family saw any of his fortune. He did not have any family of his own so left his fortune to his wife. When she died she left it all to the Catholic Church. As for our family, we are all Church of England.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
There you are then. Endless supply of free indicator material. Where I take my dogs for a run sometimes in the summer is a barn in which the local shepherd stacks a lot of those large bags that sand & gravel come in. These ones are full of wool after the sheep have had their annual haircut. I take the view that as the wool is basically worthless these days the shepherd isn't going to miss a good double handful and that's me sorted for the next year.
Free supplies the farmers or sheep won't mind BobP.

Neil.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
The woods and fields are saturated therefore there are not going to be any long walks with the dogs just yet. The plan was to take them through the wood in front of the house and then around the perimeter of the Clydesdale horses two fields. I always give the horses a carrot but at the same time have to keep an eye on the dogs for they think that it is their job to round them up. The 3 horses were at the furthest away possible part of the field and as I approached them could see one had a problem, it had been stuck all night on the fence. It had its front two legs stuck between the sheep fence and the barbed wire part of the fence at the top. I knew the farmer was away and the owner of the horses was at work so it was going to be up to me to free him. The first thing was to get the dogs out the way therefore not having any leads with me they were put in the next field. Eying up the situation I could see that this was not going to be an easy job. I first tried getting him to lift his huge foot and as I bent down could feel his nostrils on my neck. It would not be the first time I have been lifted off the ground by a horse that I was trying to help. The heat off his breath was unbelievable, just like using a hair drier. This was not going to be any good so the plan now was to lift out 3 fence posts to slacken the wire but then visualised the other two horses getting out so I used Tweed to drive them away. Once the posts were out I managed to free both his legs and then away he went none the worse. Posts back in my reward for this, loads and loads of free fly tying material stuck on the fence. Having loads of horse hair there will be a few Geoffrey Bucknall's Footballers tied this winter.
Having mentioned fly tying, having arthritis in my wrists and hands I do struggle a bit when it comes to tying flies but I am nowhere near as bad as some poor souls that you see for I don't have any pain whatsoever. I was struggling badly just trying to make up my winter two fly casts which has got me thinking that I will soon have to change to fishing a single fly. At least I don't have a problem fly fishing. I was going to say that I will make a start bung fishing to reduce the amount of casting that I do but this is something I have been doing for years without even realising it. I have been using a deer hair sedge as a bung but cant see them anymore. The next thing on the agenda is to make my own bungs with cork out of bottles that my grandson will get me from his place of work. Something else for nothing, every little helps.
Getting hold of sheep's fur and so on shouldn't be much bother. Do me good to walk the mountains and collect off fencing. Sharon (wife) and I have six days left on isolation, was doing the nessasry distancing masks washing but it found a way in?

There is a good range to cover, I will try but Thank you for showing keen interest : The Endrick Spider, Paul _B, BobP and EJW.

Neil.
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,599
Location
Wiltshire
Free supplies the farmers or sheep won't mind BobP.

Neil.
I guess the sheep are happy to get the wool off their backs during the summer, and as the shepherd gets virtually nothing for the wool I don't suppose he'd be that bothered to see about -0001p worth going walkies.
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
400
Location
South Wales
I guess the sheep are happy to get the wool off their backs during the summer, and as the shepherd gets virtually nothing for the wool I don't suppose he'd be that bothered to see about -0001p worth going walkies.
All good info, I appreciate your experience and words, Thanks BobP.

Neil.
 

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