Mouthful of hook

nitsy

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May 30, 2014
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28
Caught the fly in my mouth on a back cast today. Lips bleed quite easily, it seems.

Anyone else had similar before?
 

wobbly face

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Aug 21, 2009
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Not So Greater Manchester.
Not personally but my brother in law got the fly in his eye. I had to cut his leader leaving 6 inch or so trailing from his eye. No way would he open his eye to let me have as look, trip to A&E. They ran some drops onto his eye lid then off to another hospital to see an Ophthalmic surgeon. This was on a Sunday so was lucky the surgeon was seeing to someone else. Surgeon gave him some other eye drops onto his eye lid, his eye opened and the fly fell out. Nothing more than a scratch due to the knot.
 

4wings

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Nov 10, 2019
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Bristol
My brother in law and his best mate were fishing. His mates cast stopped suddenly
and they both looked around only to see a spectators lip pulling in time with the tentative
"where is it stuck?" little tugs.
 

wobbly face

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Aug 21, 2009
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Not So Greater Manchester.
A group of us fished a large res, one of my mates (A) was fairly new to fly fishing but could manage to cast. Another mate (B) was an old hand who for some reason stood behind A chatting, but not far enough away, one fly stuck in end of nose. :LOL: He still has a small scar to prove it and it still sometime comes up in conversation when we're reminiscing. 🍺
 

BobP

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Oct 28, 2007
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Wiltshire
Glasses and a hat didn't save me from getting a size 10 leaded Black & Peacock Spider smack between the eyes just above the top of my eyebrows. I was fishing the bank at Farmoor on a windy afternoon casting slightly across the wind. An awkward gust and the fly went through the one inch gap between hat & glasses. It was a barbed hook as they all were in those days. I had stuck a hook in my finger on a couple of occasions and had adopted the approach that it was better to hoick it out immediately. Do not stop to think about it and do it before it begins to hurt. I did this with the B & P. Luckily the hook seemed to have sliced its way in and equally luckily I took it out the way it went in which is not easy when you can't see the thing above the eyeline. There is a little half inch scar there now as a reminder to be careful when casting on a windy day.
 

original cormorant

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Jul 3, 2016
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Spey casting is the answer... Falkus was right! ;)
Not necessarily.

I've lip hooked myself when changing flies when my rod slipped from leaning against my shoulder. Also at least twice I've hooked fingers when running my hand down the rod to find the tippet.

Not sure that I recall hooking my flesh when actually casting.
 

Vintage Badger

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Apr 16, 2021
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Cheshire
Not necessarily.

I've lip hooked myself when changing flies when my rod slipped from leaning against my shoulder. Also at least twice I've hooked fingers when running my hand down the rod to find the tippet.

Not sure that I recall hooking my flesh when actually casting.
Let's face it, some people just aren't safe to be let out on their own really! ;)
 

esk

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May 17, 2006
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896
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East Lothian
My boat partner caught me in the chin strap with a damsel nymph recently. That was a sobering moment.
 

colliedog

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Sep 6, 2008
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Edinburgh
Spey casting is the answer... Falkus was right! ;)
I deeply embedded two points of a tiny treble in the back of my head when a downstream gust during a single spey. It was well in and I couldn't see it or get hold of it. The dilema was...a 10pm Friday night visit to Perth A&E or drive home, taking great care not to snag the remaining point on the head rest. That would have been awkward. The wife snipped off the exposed point so I could go to bed and present myself at a deserted ERI A&E at 7am the next morning. It took a bit if digging out. To be fair, the medics at Perth would probably have had a better idea of what to do faced with a treble hook.
 

Vintage Badger

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I deeply embedded two points of a tiny treble in the back of my head when a downstream gust during a single spey. It was well in and I couldn't see it or get hold of it. The dilema was...a 10pm Friday night visit to Perth A&E or drive home, taking great care not to snag the remaining point on the head rest. That would have been awkward. The wife snipped off the exposed point so I could go to bed and present myself at a deserted ERI A&E at 7am the next morning. It took a bit if digging out. To be fair, the medics at Perth would probably have had a better idea of what to do faced with a treble hook.
You've not been listening to Falkus... Downstream wind - Double Spey! ;)

Teasing aside, I'm glad you got sorted out and yes, I expect Perth A&E are probably quite used to attending to people who have fishing hooks embedded in them!
 

colliedog

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Edinburgh
You've not been listening to Falkus... Downstream wind - Double Spey! ;)

Teasing aside, I'm glad you got sorted out and yes, I expect Perth A&E are probably quite used to attending to people who have fishing hooks embedded in them!
You are quite right. Poor cast selection 😳

I just didn't fancy a visit to any A&E Dept on a Friday night.
 

nitsy

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May 30, 2014
Messages
28
It was a gust of wind the wrong way that got me. A reminder to be extra careful with the wind.

I'd debarbed the fly about 3 minutes before the cast.
 
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