My 1st. Classic Salmon fly - Durham Ranger

iainmortimer

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
West Sussex
We’ll get you! That’s a great first attempt. Where did you get your braid from I’d you don’t mind me asking? I might get some myself and give it a proper go.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
We’ll get you! That’s a great first attempt. Where did you get your braid from I’d you don’t mind me asking? I might get some myself and give it a proper go.
Hi Ian!
The gut and the hook came from Richard Jeffries, a great guy. Here's a link to his website

 

wingman

Well-known member
I think for your first Classic you've done a great job here Kev. I'll give you a few pointers as I know you said you were after some critique in order to improve which is part and parcel with these flies anyway. I'd say you could still start the tag a little further round the bend of the hook as your body is looking slightly short in comparison to the hook. You want to give yourself plenty space for the hackle, ribbing and throat so you're not crowding them all. Also at the blind eye end of the hook try to leave only about 1mm of bare shank which will also give more shank to tie on. Nice taper on the hackles going into the throat which are in good proportion to the hook. Tag work, body and ribbing are looking nice as is your herl head and herl butt which have nice compact turns of herl. The tail is at a good height with a nice curve which balances nicely with the wing topping. The wing itself is nicely set and proportioned but I'd probably have increased the length of the smaller Jungle Cock feather to meet the second bar on the tippets. Cheeks and horns look about right to me. All in all quite impressive and you're more or less two thirds of the way to tying a full married wing fly, the main wing and it's few odds and ends being the last but toughest phase of the fly. Hope that wasn't to brutal but a few things to consider anyway.;)
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
I think for your first Classic you've done a great job here Kev. I'll give you a few pointers as I know you said you were after some critique in order to improve which is part and parcel with these flies anyway. I'd say you could still start the tag a little further round the bend of the hook as your body is looking slightly short in comparison to the hook. You want to give yourself plenty space for the hackle, ribbing and throat so you're not crowding them all. Also at the blind eye end of the hook try to leave only about 1mm of bare shank which will also give more shank to tie on. Nice taper on the hackles going into the throat which are in good proportion to the hook. Tag work, body and ribbing are looking nice as is your herl head and herl butt which have nice compact turns of herl. The tail is at a good height with a nice curve which balances nicely with the wing topping. The wing itself is nicely set and proportioned but I'd probably have increased the length of the smaller Jungle Cock feather to meet the second bar on the tippets. Cheeks and horns look about right to me. All in all quite impressive and you're more or less two thirds of the way to tying a full married wing fly, the main wing and it's few odds and ends being the last but toughest phase of the fly. Hope that wasn't to brutal but a few things to consider anyway.;)
Thanks Mark!!
I appreciate your feedback, and I'm made up to think you thought so highly of my 1st attempt. I'll try and incorporate your advice in my next fly, a Lady Amherst 👍
 

tj hooker

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
N.Ireland
An excellent effort m r roid that’s a really nice Durham Ranger as always Mark has given you excellent critique I know it all seems like small margins but it’s what it takes thanks for the link to the hooks something I need to sort out myself soon.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Thanks TJ, I appreciate any and all constructive critisism, it's how we learn new skills 👍
I'm going to tie another couple of similar flies, Lady Amherst and maybe an Orange Parson. Hopefully I'll improve and grow in confidence... Built wings after that!!!!
My only concern is that I'm getting behind with my trout flies, these classic salmon flies are absorbing and addictive.....
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
For a "1st" "Trad" I reckon you've done hyper-well, I'll bet there's a LOT of research gone into that, to get it so good. Mark seems to be getting the details pretty much spot-on. Though hook choice for individual patterns, to save from things like potentially crowding some of the proportions can make a difference, a slightly longer shanked pattern maybe a thing to consider for this style of dressing in future. Like trout hooks, there's to, or three many options to choose from, as doubtless you're finding out. But really great work & a very tidy photo.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
For a "1st" "Trad" I reckon you've done hyper-well, I'll bet there's a LOT of research gone into that, to get it so good. Mark seems to be getting the details pretty much spot-on. Though hook choice for individual patterns, to save from things like potentially crowding some of the proportions can make a difference, a slightly longer shanked pattern maybe a thing to consider for this style of dressing in future. Like trout hooks, there's to, or three many options to choose from, as doubtless you're finding out. But really great work & a very tidy photo.
Thanks John,
I did a bit of online research, but I think there's a fair bit of beginners luck involved. My next few attempts with be the acid test.
I have been practicing mounting married wings on a 'practice' fly, and I think it's a case of 'work in progress'
 

wingman

Well-known member
For a "1st" "Trad" I reckon you've done hyper-well, I'll bet there's a LOT of research gone into that, to get it so good. Mark seems to be getting the details pretty much spot-on. Though hook choice for individual patterns, to save from things like potentially crowding some of the proportions can make a difference, a slightly longer shanked pattern maybe a thing to consider for this style of dressing in future. Like trout hooks, there's to, or three many options to choose from, as doubtless you're finding out. But really great work & a very tidy photo.
Good point John although I'd keep off the Partridge CS10/3's as they have awfully long bends that make judging proportions difficult. I'd only use them for Spey/Dee flies or Black Dogs or any other 'Speyish' looking classics like a McIntyre, Black Boy, Delfur Fancy etc but they do have longer shanks. There's not really much choice for beginners who don't necessarily want to go to the expense of buying hooks at a tenner a pop when they're trying to get to grips with the techniques It's a waste of money and just not necessary unless they intend to strip the fly at a later date and reuse the hook. I think the CS6's are about the best for proportions for beginners and if you take the tag more around the bend of the hook they seem to work better instead of following guidelines where you're supposed to start the tag opposite the hook point and finish it opposite the barb. This doesn't always play out as there are many different hooks styles (referring to the more expensive handmade hooks) and sometimes following the standard as mentioned above can make the fly look 'off' so it's best to work out what looks better by eye for each style of hook and go with that for all your flies on that hook.
 

baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
Good point John although I'd keep off the Partridge CS10/3's as they have awfully long bends that make judging proportions difficult. I'd only use them for Spey/Dee flies or Black Dogs or any other 'Speyish' looking classics like a McIntyre, Black Boy, Delfur Fancy etc but they do have longer shanks. There's not really much choice for beginners who don't necessarily want to go to the expense of buying hooks at a tenner a pop when they're trying to get to grips with the techniques It's a waste of money and just not necessary unless they intend to strip the fly at a later date and reuse the hook. I think the CS6's are about the best for proportions for beginners and if you take the tag more around the bend of the hook they seem to work better instead of following guidelines where you're supposed to start the tag opposite the hook point and finish it opposite the barb. This doesn't always play out as there are many different hooks styles (referring to the more expensive handmade hooks) and sometimes following the standard as mentioned above can make the fly look 'off' so it's best to work out what looks better by eye for each style of hook and go with that for all your flies on that hook.
Also, Partridge Pryce-Tannatt hooks are great for beginners. They are double the price of CS6s but still affordable and they are much nicer hooks in my opinion. Certainly better suited for Tippet wing flies as the shank is longer than on CS6. Sadly they are hard to get these days. I wish I bought more last year when they were still available.

I almost sound like an expert now :ROFLMAO:


Cheers,
Sebastian
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
Seb, Ron Jeffries probably still has loads of them, but may not have them listed on his site so it's always worth dropping him an email. He bought up all of Partrige's old stock & I mean several tonnes of it, Though his health & age is making it difficult to get to shows these days, let alone the cost - especially coming over from France for 2 /3 days etc, with only his wife to help him at both ends. To do a show takes a couple of days (at least) either side to arrange van hire, pack - set up - do show- re-pack & return- repeat etc.
 
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baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
Thanks John. I‘ll give him a shout. I bought stuff from him before.

I quite like these hooks. They are much nicer looking than CS6s’ and have longer shank which I like as well. Of course, they are not as nice as hand made ones but at £2 per hook they are good choice for practising.

Cheers,
Sebastian
 
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