My 2nd. Classic Salmon fly - Lady Amherst

wingman

Well-known member
No holding you back Kev good proportions again and nice all round fly and JC looks right this time. One thing, if you reduce the gut eye length by about a third it will look more classic style but you have the right amount of hook shank left showing this time. Black Ranger and Stevenson are two other flies that just use tippets that might be worth a try.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Thanks Mark!!
I didn't have any suitable Teal for the throat, so I used a large, 'fluey' grizzle as a substitute..... To be honest, proportions aside, I think the Durham Ranger was tidier.
I'm working on an Orange Parson at the moment, getting a smooth transition from the lavender floss tag onto the orange floss rear portion of the body is challenging to say the least!!!!!
It's coming along nicely though, and it continues well I think it will be my best attempt so far.
Famous last words........ :):)
 

baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
Well done Kevin. 2 flies in 2 days! You certainly caught the bug.

I see you put yesterday’s comments into practice. I really like the taper on the body hackle and the proportions of it. This is usually the bit I struggle with so really impressed.

Look forward to seeing your Orange Parson. It’s probably my favourite out of those three flies. Take your time with it and I am sure it’ll come nice.

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Thanks Sebastian,
I have been practicing since Christmas, and I have quite a few 'failures' that need the razor run through them to salvage the hook😂
I'm enjoying the journey so far, and I'm overwhelmed with the help and encouragement I've received from social media.
I understand about taking my time, I tend to rush things...... I will try and be a little bit deliberate and precise with the Orange Parson 😊👍
 
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baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
Patience with these flies is key. I usually lose it at winging stage after I mess up my third pair of married wings :ROFLMAO:

Good luck.

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Patience with these flies is key. I usually lose it at winging stage after I mess up my third pair of married wings :ROFLMAO:

Good luck.

Cheers,
Sebastian
The winging stage, especially when I've been practicing married wings is my nemesis.....
I think I'll be diagnosed as clinically insane before I master them.....
It's a madness, sheer madness 😂🤣
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
"It's a madness, sheer madness" Understatement of all salmon tyers, & I do mean ALL ! Though maybe that's why we do it ?

Going from, trout to salmon, has a lot of transferable skills, as well as many new ones. Back in the day - say 50's the way people learned, was with a book at the side of the table & to repeat tie each section, until they got it exactly as the book said before going onto the next stgage. So it was not unusual to spend many weeks (often full time) at these stages. It taught one (not me b.t.w.) to get entirely repeatable results. The tyer's then very often had only gossamer silk, very limited tools & often NO vice or bobbin holder to work with, the flies were virtually all tied to fish with, so had to be durable as well.

With the on-set of the developments, especially on the tool front, it is possible to go from one style of pattern to another with comparative ease, though still best to take things in proggresive rtaher than giant steps;. Which you've done here so far, you will be able to see any unwanted issues that can occur between slightly different materials & their application, proportion, positioning etc.

Tying them should be a "fun" thing to enjoy, rather than a sprint to the finish, nobody can perfect every stage within days, it WILL take many months before anyone becomes a really good all rounder. Not least learning how to choose materials & these days substitutes !

After a while, you will develop your own style, obviously based on a combination of others, as there's only so much you can do with most materials, & how others you like utillize them. There are many dozens of top flight tyers around, & some specialize in specific sections of the fly, others have a more shotgun type of approach & try to do everything perfectly. Whatever route you choose to go down, I can suggest tyers in that genre that you might like to have a look at.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
"It's a madness, sheer madness" Understatement of all salmon tyers, & I do mean ALL ! Though maybe that's why we do it ?

Going from, trout to salmon, has a lot of transferable skills, as well as many new ones. Back in the day - say 50's the way people learned, was with a book at the side of the table & to repeat tie each section, until they got it exactly as the book said before going onto the next stgage. So it was not unusual to spend many weeks (often full time) at these stages. It taught one (not me b.t.w.) to get entirely repeatable results. The tyer's then very often had only gossamer silk, very limited tools & often NO vice or bobbin holder to work with, the flies were virtually all tied to fish with, so had to be durable as well.

With the on-set of the developments, especially on the tool front, it is possible to go from one style of pattern to another with comparative ease, though still best to take things in proggresive rtaher than giant steps;. Which you've done here so far, you will be able to see any unwanted issues that can occur between slightly different materials & their application, proportion, positioning etc.

Tying them should be a "fun" thing to enjoy, rather than a sprint to the finish, nobody can perfect every stage within days, it WILL take many months before anyone becomes a really good all rounder. Not least learning how to choose materials & these days substitutes !

After a while, you will develop your own style, obviously based on a combination of others, as there's only so much you can do with most materials, & how others you like utillize them. There are many dozens of top flight tyers around, & some specialize in specific sections of the fly, others have a more shotgun type of approach & try to do everything perfectly. Whatever route you choose to go down, I can suggest tyers in that genre that you might like to have a look at.
Please do, John!!
Many thanks
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
Assumedly your on (the freaded) fbk... here's a few to have a look at & these are not in ANY order b.t.w. Vegar Tandgrand, Dave Carne, Marcello Malventino, Charles Chute, Yuji Wabe,
Pekka Kärkkäinen, Bruno Pimpanini, Fabrizio Gajardoni, Daniel Jordan,
Therte are many, many dozens of others, if you need a list of groups, then no problem, though it might be a bit later on as I have several other things to deal with a.t.m.
 

Lewis Chessman

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Isle of Lewis
Well done, m r roid! My utterly uneducated eye prefers this second fly. I hope you return to re-view them in a few days as, in rod building, I find the closeness of recent events can colour my view of the result and a bit of time can give a different critical assessment.
As said above, you took on board the advice on No.1 and 'the whole' of No. 2 looks a better shape to me. I think the GP crests are a part of it - although they don't actually meet one can envisage where they would, while on No. 1 they would cross. I've no knowledge of Classic tying so maybe it is a non-point, just my own aesthetics.

If I may offer one small suggestion, your fly deserves a better, crisper photo!
Again, personal, but I think I prefer seeing the fly dead-level as in No.1 rather than slightly tilted, above. I do feel like a real sh1t just mentioning it but after the hours spent at the vice ..... you and the fly deserve the exposure. ;)
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Well done, m r roid! My utterly uneducated eye prefers this second fly. I hope you return to re-view them in a few days as, in rod building, I find the closeness of recent events can colour my view of the result and a bit of time can give a different critical assessment.
As said above, you took on board the advice on No.1 and 'the whole' of No. 2 looks a better shape to me. I think the GP crests are a part of it - although they don't actually meet one can envisage where they would, while on No. 1 they would cross. I've no knowledge of Classic tying so maybe it is a non-point, just my own aesthetics.

If I may offer one small suggestion, your fly deserves a better, crisper photo!
Again, personal, but I think I prefer seeing the fly dead-level as in No.1 rather than slightly tilted, above. I do feel like a real sh1t just mentioning it but after the hours spent at the vice ..... you and the fly deserve the exposure. ;)
Hi Lewis,
No need to feel like a real sh1t :):)
Photography isn't one of my strong points, but I agree, it could be sharper and level.
I'm working on an Orange Parson at the moment, and I'm quite pleased with this one
 
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arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
Have you checked out Fabri- site & tyhe flies, now a bit out of date but there are sections from it here https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&ei=LN9LXsS7CdCf1fAPwMOjyAU&q=fabrizio+gajardoni+flies&oq=fabrizio+gajaradoni&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0i13i30l2.0.0..25518...1.0..0.128.128.0j1......0......gws-wiz.jxJftRR1q9w

& some of the friends of Ronn Lucas, like Dave Gotzmer http://ronnlucassr.com/

Some fbk pagesthat you might not know... Artistic Salmon Flies, Facebook - Classic Salmon Flies, Artistic Salmon Flies. https://www.facebook.com/groups/265622513498122/ .
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Have you checked out Fabri- site & tyhe flies, now a bit out of date but there are sections from it here https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&ei=LN9LXsS7CdCf1fAPwMOjyAU&q=fabrizio+gajardoni+flies&oq=fabrizio+gajaradoni&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0i13i30l2.0.0..25518...1.0..0.128.128.0j1......0......gws-wiz.jxJftRR1q9w

& some of the friends of Ronn Lucas, like Dave Gotzmer http://ronnlucassr.com/

Some fbk pagesthat you might not know... Artistic Salmon Flies, Facebook - Classic Salmon Flies, Artistic Salmon Flies. https://www.facebook.com/groups/265622513498122/ .
Ma y thanks, John. Much appreciated
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
I knew I was tempting fate by saying the Orange Parson was coming along nicely.....
It all turned to rats droppings last night so I stripped the hook bare and will start afresh...
I might try a Garibaldi instead of the Orange Parson. I love the look of the body on it :) (y)
 

baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
I knew I was tempting fate by saying the Orange Parson was coming along nicely.....
It all turned to rats droppings last night so I stripped the hook bare and will start afresh...
I might try a Garibaldi instead of the Orange Parson. I love the look of the body on it :) (y)
Don’t give up on it Kevin. It’s a beautiful fly. Just take your time with it. 👍
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Don’t give up on it Kevin. It’s a beautiful fly. Just take your time with it. 👍
I 'll definitely have another shot at it Sebastian, it is beautiful. I'm waiting for some Cock of the Rock subs, so might try it again in a couple of weeks.
 
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