Net question

Rod44

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Apr 4, 2019
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Neath Port Talbot
So im getting everything together ready for a go at the trout on the river , complete newbie to it all and its going to be a big dose of trial and error . Anyone recommend a functional net and best way to carry it ? Im intending wearing my chesties and a small back pack , as i will be doing a fair bit of roving .

Cheers
Rod
 

Mrtrout

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Mar 21, 2008
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England.
Great thankyou , im assuming rubberised mesh is the way to go then ?

They do both rubber or nylon mesh, I’ve always used a mesh one but fancied trying the rubber type.
If you do order one make sure you get that magnet lanyard, you won’t find a better one for £3.99 it has a super long coil lanyard.
S.

- - - Updated - - -

I just realised, if you get that net it comes with the magnetic keeper as well. :thumbs:
S.
 

Rod44

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Apr 4, 2019
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Neath Port Talbot
Really appreciate the promptly given advice thankyou . I saw in Sportfish catalogue theres a Smith Creek net holster that fits on your wading belt , looks a neat idea but pricey gadgets i will not get into until i find my feet a bit and what works for me .
 

haggstock

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Halifax
The best way to carry your net is this . Half a two part magnet fastened to the loop on the back of your wading jacket or fly vest or backpack ( use a £1 carabiner clip ) the other half of the magnet cable tied to the front of your net frame . I’m not a lover of the curly cables on the Chinese magnets , so I use about 4 feet of shock cord from Go Outdoors , fasten one end to the carabiner clip the other to your net handle . Now the net will hang on your back , detach with a quick tug and you can reattach it just by waving around the back of your neck . The shock cord is light strong and stretchy .

I’m also not a fan of the clear rubber “ ghost nets “ . I think they are too shallow. But that’s just an opinion . If you want a net for life , buy a Brodin .
 

taffy1

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Feb 26, 2014
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Well within my comfort zone
So im getting everything together ready for a go at the trout on the river , complete newbie to it all and its going to be a big dose of trial and error . Anyone recommend a functional net and best way to carry it ? Im intending wearing my chesties and a small back pack , as i will be doing a fair bit of roving .

Cheers
Rod

Just remember, to quote an angler from a bygone age, " A small net can only accomodate a small fish." Richard Walker if I remember correctly.
 

speytime

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Feb 27, 2009
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West Lothian Scotland
I like the racquet type with the deeper nylon net they are light enough not to notice them and have a decent depth, my one can accommodate a 5lb grilse with a bit room to spare.

Al
 

richfish1

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May 7, 2012
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Shropshire & Mid Wales
If you fish different watercourses regularly, rubber mesh is a must. They dry in a very short time, which prevents transferring nasties from one river to another. I rarely get chance to fish more than once a week so my nylon meshed net is fine. Modern nets are all fish friendly, nice and soft.

Respect to all Fly Fishers....
 

JohnH

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May 18, 2006
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Near Southampton
The Snowbee 3 in 1 net is worth a second glance. Straight lift from the sales description;
The net comes complete with 2 telescopic aluminium handles. The shorter model is only 12” when closed, providing an ideal river ‘scoop’ net, particularly for competition fishing. This telescopes out to 18” for additional reach and fits neatly within international competition rules for overall length.

The second telescopic handle extends from a closed length of 25” to a fully extended length of 45”, providing an ideal river bank or small stillwater net. Both handles are fitted with high density foam grips. This versatile net really is a 3-in-1 for the river or bank angler.
So you get the benefits of the pan type net when wading and also won't have to buy a second net for bank fishing or if you venture on to stillwaters. My own example gets a lot of use on chalkstreams.

"A small net can only accommodate a small fish" as noted above is sound advice. You never know your luck...

Currently £42.99 at Garry Evans who are including a free magnetic attachment in the price.
 

BobP

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Oct 28, 2007
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Wiltshire
Having gone through 3 Wychwood Rover nets is about 18 months I plumped for a McLean folding telescopic net. It is big enough to accommodate anything I or anyone else is likely to catch. I'm a fly fishing guide so a reliable net is an absolute requirement.but I also use the net myself from bank or boat on reservoirs.

Expensive it is, but worth the money. It has a clip on the handle so it hangs from the loop on the back of my fly vest so no loops of cord to get in the way and no magnets to get pulled apart when the net snags a bush. I lost a net in Austria three years ago when that happened - its floating around the Black Sea by now I expect.
 

ACW

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May 17, 2006
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In between the old and new Arsenal grounds
For my river fishing I really dislike the tennis racket type of net,much prefeing something with at least 3 foot of handle ,often use smallest size gye net .
The only tennis racket type net i use is a vintage large wooden one for float tubing.
my dislike is probably because most of my trout and grayling river fishing is done from the bank where a tennis racket requires contortion to land the fish .
 

bobnudd

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Mar 12, 2017
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Redditch
The only advice I would give is if you go for a scope net,go for one with a large rubber mesh . As I find that they get tangled in the undergrowth and barbed wire less than the others
 

haggstock

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As you can see , it’s a can of worms , and it’s all based on people’s own preference there is no right , no wrong only opinion .

The only piece of advice I’d be dogmatic about is this , whatever you end up with and however you carry it , make sure it’s tied onto you somehow so your new purchase doesn’t go zooming down the next section of fast water if you drop it . That advice also goes for most other accessories from sunnies, through to line snips .
 

olive_dabbler

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.
Having gone through 3 Wychwood Rover nets is about 18 months I plumped for a McLean folding telescopic net. It is big enough to accommodate anything I or anyone else is likely to catch. I'm a fly fishing guide so a reliable net is an absolute requirement.but I also use the net myself from bank or boat on reservoirs.

Expensive it is, but worth the money. It has a clip on the handle so it hangs from the loop on the back of my fly vest so no loops of cord to get in the way and no magnets to get pulled apart when the net snags a bush. I lost a net in Austria three years ago when that happened - its floating around the Black Sea by now I expect.

Use a McLean folding net on stillwaters all the time - superb nets. But on the large side for rivers, or is that that the trout I catch are on the small side, I suspect the latter! :shocked:

Use one of these for the back of my vest, rather than the clip, but not sure you can get them any more.

 

BobP

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Iain

I do most of my guiding on the chalkstreams and the trout tend to be fairly big. Also, many of the clients are not that experienced so a larger net enables me to complete a netting job more effectively. It doesn't do to lose one at the net rim!
 

wrongfoot

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Dec 2, 2007
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Northumberland
If you don't want the (admittedly lovely) look of a wooden pan net one of these is more practical for most river trout fishing Leeda Magnetic Scoop Net | GO Outdoors dirt cheap, very light (which is an very under-valued thing) and allows you to skim insects from the surface to see what's hatching.

If you have a ring on the back of your jacket/sling bag/rucksack and you're right handed then... fit your magnet off centre to the left on the front of the hoop (not the handle) then when you reach behind you with your left hand the handle will fall easily to hand as it will hang slightly to the left. Hang it with the opening of the hoop facing backwards and the net to your back, then as you swing it out and to the front it will be open ready to use. The elastic lanyard from the handle to the ring is only to avoid you losing your net if dropped in the current. When handling the net it will pass from the ring on your back under your left arm and down to your wrist.

The downside is that your back will get a little damp and slightly fish-fragranced with repeated use, a good rinse and shake reduces this a bit as do rubberised meshes. If that bothers you other ways of hanging are drier, but not as efficient. I vary depending on how cold it is and whether I'm wearing a waterproof top.
 
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