New Zealand indicator.

DutyDruid

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Just a quick noob question.
I understand the concept behind the indicator and the pretty colours, but as a country boy was wondering if it's possible to use good old sheep's wool feo the barbed wire around the edge of a field. It will have the natural lanoline already there, but not the pretty colours, however if it was to come off the line then it's only natural product going down stream. Whats the thoughts behind this.
 

wobbly face

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Been there and used it. NZ indicators do use dyed wool.
The problem with using the barbed wire wool is preparation. It can be knotted, contains gawd knows what mixed in the wool. You need to tease and twist it to a yarn in order to get it into the tube. The natural white can look like a foam bubble.
 

DutyDruid

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Been there and used it. NZ indicators do use dyed wool.
The problem with using the barbed wire wool is preparation. It can be knotted, contains gawd knows what mixed in the wool. You need to tease and twist it to a yarn in order to get it into the tube. The natural white can look like a foam bubble.
Would an alternative be hollow fill as used in duvets and jackets, only asking as I am a tight fisted and well known for our traits, Yorkshire man. Hehe
 

silver creek

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First a little history.

The NZ indicator was actually invented by an American from California named Rudy Ferris. Who ever sells the NZ Indicator saw an opportunity to market it. The Ferris indicator used the empty plastic ink tubes from used ball point pen cartridges. It was described in an article about in 2005.

The story is here:


Secondly, there is no reason to buy a NZ Indicator. They can easily be made with a few items. That was why the original instructions for the Ferris Indicator were freely shared.

The instructions were published on the link below which is no longer active:


However, I published a short article on how to make a Ferris Indicator for Our Trout Unlimited newspaper. There are also instructions for an insect sampling net.

See page 8 in Wisconsin Trout below:

http://wicouncil.tu.org/sites/default/files/2017 January.pdf

Buy the 2mm ID 3 mm OD silicone tubing here:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2m-Clear-Food-Grade-Silicone-Tubing-Milk-Hose-Beer-Translucent-Pipe-Soft-Rubber/302669983866



 
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Mrtrout

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England.
Just a quick noob question.
I understand the concept behind the indicator and the pretty colours, but as a country boy was wondering if it's possible to use good old sheep's wool feo the barbed wire around the edge of a field. It will have the natural lanoline already there, but not the pretty colours, however if it was to come off the line then it's only natural product going down stream. Whats the thoughts behind this.
Its good stuff, look for the orange coloured stuff on the barbed wire, it’s what they put on the Rams so they know which sheep have been serviced.
S.
 

BobP

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Sheep's wool is fine, but as wobbly face says, it can be stuffed with all sorts of rubbish. There is a barn where I walk my dogs quite often and I took the opportunity of topping up the supply a couple of weeks ago. The sheep had been shorn and there was one of those ton sized bags that sand & gravel comes in full to the brim with wool. I just "borrowed" a big handful.

It is sticky with lanolin but that does wear off after a while. I add a floatant to my indicators as a matter of course. Sheep wool will look like a feather on the water and as those are part of a fish's existence it is not likely to spook fish in clear water.
 

DutyDruid

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Its good stuff, look for the orange coloured stuff on the barbed wire, it’s what they put on the Rams so they know which sheep have been serviced.
S.
Nowt wrong with a good tupping. Haha
 

rabmax

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I make my own little yarn indicators from bonnie craft cord.I find it just floats better than wool throught the day.Use it on polypropylene emergers too_One ball is probably a life time supply.20200704_095033.jpg
 
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thetrouttickler

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Sounds like there's only one way to find out.

I don't see why not. Especially if you focus on the softer wool on the fence which isn't knotted and tangled together. Try and collect it so that the fibres are arranged in the same direction rather than cross ways (if that makes sense). Separating enough and pulling the tube over the wool then shouldn't be an issue - because it's the same stuff the NZ indicator uses, wool. The pack I bought (coincidentally in NZ) had 95% white wool and 5% green wool. I see it is sold with orange and black wool here too. Unless the lighting doesn't allow, I only ever use the white wool because it's a natural colour for sheep wool.

When you have attached the indicator and trimmed it, you should apply floatant to it too.

p.s. I've never had a fish rise to the wool indicator but it happened for the first time 2 weekend's ago.
 

DutyDruid

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I make my own little yarn indicators from bonnie craft cord.I find it just floats better than wool throught the day.Use it on polypropylene emergers too_One ball is probably a life time supply.View attachment 28973
That's a cracking idea and ideal for you clever beggers that tie your flies, I don't unfortunately so have to make do.
 
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