New Zealand style..

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
A couple of suggestions I should try this on my river I've had a look at YouTube with little help other than confusion.. I understand the dry fly what puzzles me is do I tie the nymph to the hook of my Klink.. If so what knot..And how far underneath the river has some deep. Pools and other parts are shallow..
All help greatly appreciated
Gary
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20200609_125427.jpg
    IMG_20200609_125427.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 17

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
You can tie your dry on a dropper or tie the nymph lengh to the hook of the dry, i prefer my dry fly as a dropper at this time of year i would be worried about getting the nymph so deep, theres nothing more frustrating about getting snagged up all the time.
So dry is the dropper and nymph on the point. Sorry sir if I've not quite grasped this.. Thank you
 

glueman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
3,148
Location
on the banks of the A5
buy klinkhammer with a built in loop for a dropper from Orvis or Peter at Bakewell or others available then tie your nymph onto this about 12 or 18 inches below
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
buy klinkhammer with a built in loop for a dropper from Orvis or Peter at Bakewell or others available then tie your nymph onto this about 12 or 18 inches below
I have seen those I think I have a rough idea.. My river is deep in some places and shallow in other I will try the new zealand method on the deep. Pools and dry fly the shallower areas we have had a spattering of rain so a little water in her today.. Thank you
Gary
 

thetrouttickler

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2009
Messages
2,202
Location
West Sussex
Keep it simple. Tie the nymph to the hook shank of the dry with an improved clinch knot. You can use any number of dries, but klinkhamer and deer hair sedges tend to work best because they are a little more buoyant (and also happen to be flies that catch fish). The tippet can be adjusted to the depth of the water - the deeper the water the longer the tippet - and you can fish almost all water this way, including riffles.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,448
Location
West Lothian Scotland
If i wanted to keep the nymph higher in the water I'd fish it on a dropper, to fish the nymph at 3ft deep I'd add 3ft to the bend of the dry.
Imho the tippet ring on the fly is neat but a gimmick, if you grinner/uni a length of nylon to the bend it won't budge.
Fwiw the grinner/uni is worth learning it covers most applications and it's simple and absolutely reasonable.

Al
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
If i wanted to keep the nymph higher in the water I'd fish it on a dropper, to fish the nymph at 3ft deep I'd add 3ft to the bend of the dry.
Imho the tippet ring on the fly is neat but a gimmick, if you grinner/uni a length of nylon to the bend it won't budge.
Fwiw the grinner/uni is worth learning it covers most applications and it's simple and absolutely reasonable.

Al
Have spent alot of time working on my uni.. Thanks you
 

Sash

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2006
Messages
377
Location
London & SW Wales
I tie the Klink on first (so its nearest the rod!), then attach the dropper mono/tippet to the hook bend using a half blood knot. Sometimes, before the knot has been tightened, the loop flips off the hook, but I have never had this happen after the knot has been tightenend, even with barbless hooks.

I keep the dropper tippet somewhere between 18-24” long, never less. And I vary the depth that the nymph I tie on the end fishes by adjusting the weight of the nymph, NOT the length of the dropper.

So a tungsten-headed nymph for very deep/fast water, normal goldheads or weighted nymphs for mid-water, and unweighted nymphs for emergers.

The only problem is that not all dry flies will support the heavier nymphs, especially tungsten heads. The debate, therefore, is whether you are intending to actually catch something on the dry (in which case find a bigger/bushier one or, better, a smaller nymph), or just use it as an indicator (in which case you are into more classic European nymphing).
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
If i wanted to keep the nymph higher in the water I'd fish it on a dropper, to fish the nymph at 3ft deep I'd add 3ft to the bend of the dry.
Imho the tippet ring on the fly is neat but a gimmick, if you grinner/uni a length of nylon to the bend it won't budge.
Fwiw the grinner/uni is worth learning it covers most applications and it's simple and absolutely reasonable.

Al
Alot of sense there mate thanks and will try a little later.. I will see how deep she and alter lenth of the nymph accordingly
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
I tie the Klink on first (so its nearest the rod!), then attach the dropper mono/tippet to the hook bend using a half blood knot. Sometimes, before the knot has been tightened, the loop flips off the hook, but I have never had this happen after the knot has been tightenend, even with barbless hooks.

I keep the dropper tippet somewhere between 18-24” long, never less. And I vary the depth that the nymph I tie on the end fishes by adjusting the weight of the nymph, NOT the length of the dropper.

So a tungsten-headed nymph for very deep/fast water, normal goldheads or weighted nymphs for mid-water, and unweighted nymphs for emergers.

The only problem is that not all dry flies will support the heavier nymphs, especially tungsten heads. The debate, therefore, is whether you are intending to actually catch something on the dry (in which case find a bigger/bushier one or, better, a smaller nymph), or just use it as an indicator (in which case you are into more classic European nymphing).
My only hope or want is to catch a fish.. So I will try a nice Klink on top and a medium nymph and see where it takes me.. Thanks again all..
 

Bongoch

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
394
Location
Bristol
I keep the dropper tippet somewhere between 18-24” long, never less. And I vary the depth that the nymph I tie on the end fishes by adjusting the weight of the nymph, NOT the length of the dropper.

So a tungsten-headed nymph for very deep/fast water, normal goldheads or weighted nymphs for mid-water, and unweighted nymphs for emergers.

Agree with that, for deeper sections I'll usually use a 3mm tungsten bead with a 2.5 or 2.0mm bead employed for shallower sections. The only problem with this is that if you do a lot of chopping and changing you're shortening the length of your dropper which will eventually have to be replaced. Should also be noted that the nymph doesn't have to be weighed to work. On occasion I've used a spider, can be very effective if the fish are taking nymphs just subsurface.
 

thetrouttickler

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2009
Messages
2,202
Location
West Sussex
Weight helps the fly get down to the feeding zone quickly. It's the speed which is key. No point in the fly only getting into the "zone" at the end of the drift.

It makes no sense to say never increase the length of the tippet between dry and nymph. The water depth will dictate the length of tippet. If you're fishing water which is 1.5 metres deep, and the fish are feeding on the bottom, having 3 feet of tippet hanging from your dry is rarely going to work. Your heavy nymph will probably just end up dragging your dry fly under, where it's no good as an indicator. (NZ style wouldn't be my first choice in deep water, but that's another story).

On the flip side, if you're using too long a tippet in shallow water, chances are you may even be missing takes.
 

Lewis Chessman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Messages
1,993
Location
Isle of Lewis
Hi, GEK79. I had a couple of weeks in N.Z. some years ago. One thing I learned (probably too late on!) was that it's wise to change your fly/flies and dropper length to suit each piece of water you come to. It takes time and patience to continually change your rig but that should pay dividends. It's not always time wasted if you can keep half an eye on the water while you're changing the set up. You could see something move to a fly or if your approach has unsettled a fish it might have returned to its station by the time you're ready to cast again.
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,770
Location
Irleand
Hi, GEK79. I had a couple of weeks in N.Z. some years ago. One thing I learned (probably too late on!) was that it's wise to change your fly/flies and dropper length to suit each piece of water you come to. It takes time and patience to continually change your rig but that should pay dividends. It's not always time wasted if you can keep half an eye on the water while you're changing the set up. You could see something move to a fly or if your approach has unsettled a fish it might have returned to its station by the time you're ready to cast again.
Great advice.. Will try that out hopefully time well spent..
 

Onnylad

Banned
Banned
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
314
Location
Craven Arms
Hi, GEK79. I had a couple of weeks in N.Z. some years ago. One thing I learned (probably too late on!) was that it's wise to change your fly/flies and dropper length to suit each piece of water you come to. It takes time and patience to continually change your rig but that should pay dividends. It's not always time wasted if you can keep half an eye on the water while you're changing the set up. You could see something move to a fly or if your approach has unsettled a fish it might have returned to its station by the time you're ready to cast again.
Absolutely great advice, also you’ll learn to use your rod to get rid of any drag of the flies ...
 

Onnylad

Banned
Banned
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
314
Location
Craven Arms
Weight helps the fly get down to the feeding zone quickly. It's the speed which is key. No point in the fly only getting into the "zone" at the end of the drift.

It makes no sense to say never increase the length of the tippet between dry and nymph. The water depth will dictate the length of tippet. If you're fishing water which is 1.5 metres deep, and the fish are feeding on the bottom, having 3 feet of tippet hanging from your dry is rarely going to work. Your heavy nymph will probably just end up dragging your dry fly under, where it's no good as an indicator. (NZ style wouldn't be my first choice in deep water, but that's another story).

On the flip side, if you're using too long a tippet in shallow water, chances are you may even be missing takes.

also using NZ style you can use the nymph as the emerging fly by using an unweighted nymph also ...
Which is better in early to mid season for trout when the fish are targeting hatching flies....
 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
3,288
Location
West Riding of Yorkshire
The New Zealand style is very much like how to remove a barbed hook from the skin and both work the same.
Catch a big fish in the dropper and a small one on the point and you only bring in the small one.
 

sewinbasher

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2006
Messages
11,677
Location
North East Wales
If your nymphs are too heavy for the dry to be a serious fish catching option it might be a better option to use the NZ Strike Indicator that can easily be slid up and down according to the depth required.

 
Top