New Zealand style..

suzzy buzzer

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
339
What you are talking about is generally known as Klink & dink or Duo, NZ I believe is the way you connect the two.
Typically NZ has the nymph attached to the bend of the dry, and despite you hearing of this method being liable to fail, it’s probably put out there by people that can’t tie a decent knot. Given a choice for most water, I’ll always opt for a NZ setup, as I believe it gives better indication to the nymph. I also have a theory that the knot that ties the trailing nymph to the bend can be taken as a trigger in the form of a shuck.

If you are not fishing NZ, then you’ll be fishing what the yanks might call “ dry dropper”, that is exactly as it sounds.

As you have probably established, the dry is there to act as a fly in its own right, and also to serve as an indicator for the trailing nymph.

It’s one of those methods where everyone has their own take on it, but if you get into it, can become quite involved. There isn’t one single setup that will cover all the water you might find in a single day. To get the best from it it can be worth chopping and Changing a bit.
Try and avoid thinking about it as means of suspending a nymph at a given depth, if that’s your take on it, just use yarn or a bung. Think of it more as giving the fish a choice of surface, or sub surface food, and presenting both the best you can at any time.

Some observations I have made over the years, and for the purposes of the description, there’s 3 types of water, broken ( pockets, rocks and riffles ) , linear ( foam/ feeding lanes, medium paced ) , and slow ( deep pools above wiers etc )

In faster broken water, it can pay to fish a dry dropper setup. If you are fishing a lighter nymph, there can be a tendency for occasional under currents to adversely affect the behaviour of the dry, making it’s presentation look unnatural. A Short dropper to the dry can allow the dry to more do its own thing. Take detection is compromised by a dropper, but it’s fast water; fish make a more rigorous effort to take a nymph, takes are less subtle. This faster water is probably the most forgiving type of water for this method.

In linear water, an NZ setup can become greater than the sum of its part in terms of presentation for each fly. The nymph will act as an anchor to the dry and help prevent it from dragging. Likewise, the dry fly will have a taming effect to the drift of the nymph, and as you are tied direct to the bend, your take indication is excellent.
If you are fishing NZ, and have a reasonably light line and leader setup, and the wind isn’t an issue you can hold off right to the dry - no drag.

Big slow/deep pools are the hardest to fish properly with this method IMO. If you really want to get a nymph deep, the weight needs upping, and the size of dries needed to suspend them become comical, and cease to become dries.
Much better I find to fish a much longer length between dry and nymph, and try and keep the nymph within sensible weights, ie, not 3mm bombs. If your pool is 3ft deep, put 6-7ft of line between nymph and dry. There will be a sweet spot during the drift that the nymph will be in the zone just above the bottom, beyond this it will start to snag. If you can cast upstream, you can get a feel for when this point will be, and as the dry comes towards you start to raise the rod lifting the dry out of the water- this will stretch a bit more out of the drift for the nymph, and can often trigger a response as you lift out. You’ll need a reasonably long mono leader to do this final lift.
Don’t think of it as firing it 40ft upstream, and then just trickling it back towards you like a float. Work with a length of line that covers the nymph descent/zone/raised rod for extra drift. That might be 6 yds of fly line, you just keep repeating this as you move up.

Lastly, you’ll come across pockets,holes, and back eddies that don’t conform to any of the above. By all means have a run through with whatever setup you currently have, but before moving on it can be worth swapping out the nymph for something you know will get down in there. Pop something with a 3 or 4mm bead on, and pop it in letting the dry play 2nd fiddle. It could be that you hold the rod high, anchor to the heavy nymph, and let the dry on a dropper sit on the surface. The dry might be dangling 1ft above the water, or it may be 1ft below it. If you are tight to the nymph, you’ll know it when you get a take.

Apologies for the essay, hope there’s a bit in there that helps.
 
Last edited:

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,883
Location
Ireland
What you are talking about is generally known as Klink & dink or Duo, NZ I believe is the way you connect the two.
Typically NZ has the nymph attached to the bend of the dry, and despite you hearing of this method being liable to fail, it’s probably put out there by people that can’t tie a decent knot. Given a choice for most water, I’ll always opt for a NZ setup, as I believe it gives better indication to the nymph. I also have a theory that the knot that ties the trailing nymph to the bend can be taken as a trigger in the form of a shuck.

If you are not fishing NZ, then you’ll be fishing what the yanks might call “ dry dropper”, that is exactly as it sounds.

As you have probably established, the dry is there to act as a fly in its own right, and also to serve as an indicator for the trailing nymph.

It’s one of those methods where everyone has their own take on it, but if you get into it, can become quite involved. There isn’t one single setup that will cover all the water you might find in a single day. To get the best from it it can be worth chopping and Changing a bit.
Try and avoid thinking about it as means of suspending a nymph at a given depth, if that’s your take on it, just use yarn or a bung. Think of it more as giving the fish a choice of surface, or sub surface food, and presenting both the best you can at any time.

Some observations I have made over the years, and for the purposes of the description, there’s 3 types of water, broken ( pockets, rocks and riffles ) , linear ( foam/ feeding lanes, medium paced ) , and slow ( deep pools above wiers etc )

In faster broken water, it can pay to fish a dry dropper setup. If you are fishing a lighter nymph, there can be a tendency for occasional under currents to adversely affect the behaviour of the dry, making it’s presentation look unnatural. A Short dropper to the dry can allow the dry to more do its own thing. Take detection is compromised by a dropper, but it’s fast water; fish make a more rigorous effort to take a nymph, takes are less subtle. This faster water is probably the most forgiving type of water for this method.

In linear water, an NZ setup can become greater than the sum of its part in terms of presentation for each fly. The nymph will act as an anchor to the dry and help prevent it from dragging. Likewise, the dry fly will have a taming effect to the drift of the nymph, and as you are tied direct to the bend, your take indication is excellent.
If you are fishing NZ, and have a reasonably light line and leader setup, and the wind isn’t an issue you can hold off right to the dry - no drag.

Big slow/deep pools are the hardest to fish properly with this method IMO. If you really want to get a nymph deep, the weight needs upping, and the size of dries needed to suspend them become comical, and cease to become dries.
Much better I find to fish a much longer length between dry and nymph, and try and keep the nymph within sensible weights, ie, not 3mm bombs. If your pool is 3ft deep, put 6-7ft of line between nymph and dry. There will be a sweet spot during the drift that the nymph will be in the zone just above the bottom, beyond this it will start to snag. If you can cast upstream, you can get a feel for when this point will be, and as the dry comes towards you start to raise the rod lifting the dry out of the water- this will stretch a bit more out of the drift for the nymph, and can often trigger a response as you lift out. You’ll need a reasonably long mono leader to do this final lift.
Don’t think of it as firing it 40ft upstream, and then just trickling it back towards you like a float. Work with a length of line that covers the nymph descent/zone/raised rod for extra drift. That might be 6 yds of fly line, you just keep repeating this as you move up.

Lastly, you’ll come across pockets,holes, and back eddies that don’t conform to any of the above. By all means have a run through with whatever setup you currently have, but before moving on it can be worth swapping out the nymph for something you know will get down in there. Pop something with a 3 or 4mm bead on, and pop it in letting the dry play 2nd fiddle. It could be that you hold the rod high, anchor to the heavy nymph, and let the dry on a dropper sit on the surface. The dry might be dangling 1ft above the water, or it may be 1ft below it. If you are tight to the nymph, you’ll know it when you get a take.

Apologies for the essay, hope there’s a bit in there that helps.
Excellent I tried the American Dropper as you termed it and I really didn't like it.. So next time I will try the Real NZ style.. I have all the waters you listed so will keep trying that's all I can do.. Many thanks for that really helpful piece..
Gary
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,883
Location
Ireland
What you are talking about is generally known as Klink & dink or Duo, NZ I believe is the way you connect the two.
Typically NZ has the nymph attached to the bend of the dry, and despite you hearing of this method being liable to fail, it’s probably put out there by people that can’t tie a decent knot. Given a choice for most water, I’ll always opt for a NZ setup, as I believe it gives better indication to the nymph. I also have a theory that the knot that ties the trailing nymph to the bend can be taken as a trigger in the form of a shuck.

If you are not fishing NZ, then you’ll be fishing what the yanks might call “ dry dropper”, that is exactly as it sounds.

As you have probably established, the dry is there to act as a fly in its own right, and also to serve as an indicator for the trailing nymph.

It’s one of those methods where everyone has their own take on it, but if you get into it, can become quite involved. There isn’t one single setup that will cover all the water you might find in a single day. To get the best from it it can be worth chopping and Changing a bit.
Try and avoid thinking about it as means of suspending a nymph at a given depth, if that’s your take on it, just use yarn or a bung. Think of it more as giving the fish a choice of surface, or sub surface food, and presenting both the best you can at any time.

Some observations I have made over the years, and for the purposes of the description, there’s 3 types of water, broken ( pockets, rocks and riffles ) , linear ( foam/ feeding lanes, medium paced ) , and slow ( deep pools above wiers etc )

In faster broken water, it can pay to fish a dry dropper setup. If you are fishing a lighter nymph, there can be a tendency for occasional under currents to adversely affect the behaviour of the dry, making it’s presentation look unnatural. A Short dropper to the dry can allow the dry to more do its own thing. Take detection is compromised by a dropper, but it’s fast water; fish make a more rigorous effort to take a nymph, takes are less subtle. This faster water is probably the most forgiving type of water for this method.

In linear water, an NZ setup can become greater than the sum of its part in terms of presentation for each fly. The nymph will act as an anchor to the dry and help prevent it from dragging. Likewise, the dry fly will have a taming effect to the drift of the nymph, and as you are tied direct to the bend, your take indication is excellent.
If you are fishing NZ, and have a reasonably light line and leader setup, and the wind isn’t an issue you can hold off right to the dry - no drag.

Big slow/deep pools are the hardest to fish properly with this method IMO. If you really want to get a nymph deep, the weight needs upping, and the size of dries needed to suspend them become comical, and cease to become dries.
Much better I find to fish a much longer length between dry and nymph, and try and keep the nymph within sensible weights, ie, not 3mm bombs. If your pool is 3ft deep, put 6-7ft of line between nymph and dry. There will be a sweet spot during the drift that the nymph will be in the zone just above the bottom, beyond this it will start to snag. If you can cast upstream, you can get a feel for when this point will be, and as the dry comes towards you start to raise the rod lifting the dry out of the water- this will stretch a bit more out of the drift for the nymph, and can often trigger a response as you lift out. You’ll need a reasonably long mono leader to do this final lift.
Don’t think of it as firing it 40ft upstream, and then just trickling it back towards you like a float. Work with a length of line that covers the nymph descent/zone/raised rod for extra drift. That might be 6 yds of fly line, you just keep repeating this as you move up.

Lastly, you’ll come across pockets,holes, and back eddies that don’t conform to any of the above. By all means have a run through with whatever setup you currently have, but before moving on it can be worth swapping out the nymph for something you know will get down in there. Pop something with a 3 or 4mm bead on, and pop it in letting the dry play 2nd fiddle. It could be that you hold the rod high, anchor to the heavy nymph, and let the dry on a dropper sit on the surface. The dry might be dangling 1ft above the water, or it may be 1ft below it. If you are tight to the nymph, you’ll know it when you get a take.

Apologies for the essay, hope there’s a bit in there that helps.
Your essay was enjoyable to read very informative.. My first outing
Any chance of a bit more info mate.. Dynamic duo...
 
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