Non-native salmon species

Fly Guy

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Reports of Pink Salmon being caught off the Ness, Spey, Dee, Helmsdale & Leven in the last week or so. How worried should we be and could these breed in our rivers? I understand that these fish spawn in summer and not as late as our native Atlantic Salmon.
 

rockslider

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They are being caught in numerous Irish west coast rivers at the moment too. They seem to be well spread out which is worrying.

---------- Post added at 04:22 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:18 AM ----------

They should be easy to spot come September when they zombiefy!
 

Fly Guy

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Do they pose a threat to our native stocks? It looks like with all the catches being recorded they are possibly breeding in our rivers? Not good......:(
 

diawl bach

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Good report there Taffy.

I suppose Nature, as they say, abhors a vacuum and currently there is a pretty big vacuum to be filled on the salmon front in many rivers. Will they visit Wales, land of the empty Hoover factory one wonders or is it a little too far south for them to travel?
 

3lbgrayling

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I believe that they were released in Northern Russia about 40 years years ago.and are now breeding there.but have been trickling down the coast of norway and getting to the Uk in small numbers for decades. this run now seems to be getting larger.Who know what the result will be.:eek:

Jim
 

Fly Guy

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Here is a possible clue.......Russian hatcheries are releasing Pink Salmon in huge numbers as follows in the east:
573.8 million in 2000
904.4 million in 2010
545.6 million in 2015
Thats a lot of fish!
Pink salmon are being reported caught in Norwegian rivers so lets assume quite a few of these fish are heading into UK waters looking for new feeding or spawning grounds.
What a pity we cannot rear the same amount in Atlantic Salmon for release. I'm not a great believer in hatcheries but if it works for Pink salmon why not Atlantic salmon?
 

MobyJones

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I'm curious, why did the Russians release Pacific salmon and not Atlantic? What was their thinking for doing so?

It amazes me when you look at all of the bio security measures different governments undertake to protect their native species and environments why they would do this!
 

3lbgrayling

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In the same vein.Why would the Canadians allow the fishfarmers to have huge Atlantic Salmon farms in the pacific.with the industries record of escapees.:eek:

Jim
 

taffy1

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Wasn't it a Scot that populated Patagonia & Tierra Del Fuego with brown trout? John Goodall back in 1935, this intervention of introducing non-native species isn't something new. These destinations are now well renowned for the sea trout fishing & the immense sizes these fish are capable of reaching.
 

MobyJones

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Wasn't it a Scot that populated Patagonia & Tierra Del Fuego with brown trout? John Goodall back in 1935, this intervention of introducing non-native species isn't something new.

Absolutely. But having had decades to study the effects of invasive species you'd think that lessons would have been learned since 1935.

The Romans were at it well before then though. :)
 
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Pacific salmon are very adaptable and introduce more successfully. They are superior in just about every way. Better eating too.
 

rockslider

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I first came across the pink salmon introductions when I worked for the fish culture research institute in Hungary in 1998. I came across it in our library there which was naturally full of fishy scientific papers.
They introduced them in the white sea as they wanted a commercial fishery closer to Moscow (or habitation in Russia!) As pink salmon is a high commercial sector for them. they also released king crab at roughly the same time. If i remember rightly, pink salmon spawn lower down a system, often just above the tidal zone, so hopefully they won't share spawning zone as Atlantic's. But I have seen them about 200 miles above the tide on the skeena system in Canada, their rivers are a lot bigger than ours so who knows what will happen.
They like shallow water so they can be easy to spot off gravel bars etc, so keep an eye out.
Sorry, I types this on my phone so may seem disjointed!

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk
 

taffy1

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Compared with other countries, a few pacific salmon shouldn't be as destructive as the silver carp & snakehead fish which decimate natural fish stocks, these, like Atlantic salmon, rarely feed in freshwater & will no doubt, provide excellent sport for migratory anglers. After all, carp, zander & other species were introduced and provide the same angling challenges for coarse anglers. Rainbow trout in stillwaters have had their fare share of escapees & even breed in rivers up around the Derbyshire Wye.
 

johnny00

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Thanks Taffy for posting the news report.

I'm on the Tweed and Tyne this week, it's looking quite dry so even a Pacific might be welcome
 

taterdu

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Compared with other countries, a few pacific salmon shouldn't be as destructive as . . .

When our Atlantic salmon stocks are under such pressure, when the stock levels in the majority of our rivers are borderline self sustaining or below, I doubt you'll get much support for that point of view. You say 'shouldn't' but the difficulty is that nobody knows what impact their presence will have upon native stocks.
 

williegunn

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Did Eric Verspoor not say he wouldn't worry as these obvious hatchery fish would enter a destructive vortex and die out in a few generations? I'm sure that was what he said about Atlantics, perhaps he could get funding for a genetic study!!
 
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