Non-native salmon species

Tangled

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Not at all.
2 year life cycle, every odd year, they will reappear, only question is how many?

Yes, but 2017 saw thousands of Pinks arrive while in 2015 and 2019 (and all previous odd years) it was a few hundred. Because 2019 was so small it means that they didn't breed successfully here in 2017 and new arrivals this year are again coming from adventuring fish from the Barents sea not returning fish that bred here.

But no one knows; we don't even know why so many came in 2017, there's speculation that it was overpopulation in the Barents sea but why didn't it happen again in 2019?
 
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Tangled

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Apparently there's a bit of an invasion of pinks starting to happen across Norway and Sweden. Scotland fisheries have started a map of where they're being caught there.

Screenshot 2021-07-07 at 18.04.01.png


 

Tangled

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Word from 'another place' is that the Pumphouse pool on the Dee is full of pinks.
 

JoeOh

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Has anyone eaten one of these 'visitors', and if so..... how was it
 

Tangled

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Has anyone eaten one of these 'visitors', and if so..... how was it
Yes, several. If you catch them fresh run they're indistinguishable from Atlantics. I've eaten both raw and grilled, side-by-side, both caught on the same day and eaten the same day.

They look pretty unappetising when they'r coloured, but I've not tried them in that state.
 

Noodles

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I'd say thats highly likely as a pod of around 50 pinks was present in the Dee at the weekend. The fact that hatched fry go straight to sea rather than hanging about in the river probably explains why electrofishing hasn't picked up pink 'smolts' and also why pinks spawn in the lower reaches. That coupled with the fact that they spawn much earlier than Atlantics leads me to conclude that they will have very little if any impact on Atlantic salmon spawning - also a view given by a couple of Dee fishery officers I bumped into.
Very true and well pointed out the clear and obvious facts regarding Pink Salmon.
However what would happen If say one year down the line instead of a few hundred a few hundred thousand started entering our rivers, the competition for space and during drought years it would become an issue.
But thankfully we are not anything near that stage yet.

Interesting point that they are regarded as a pest, not to dissimilar to the regard anglers had for our own grilse runs many many moons ago .
 

stevel

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Yes they grow their "humps" and ugly kypes when they get into spawning colours (red and green).
I did an Alaskan trip many years ago and caught many on single handed rods and sinktip lines with egg sucking leech flies and pink/purple Teeny nymphs.
The fresh run silver pinks are actually very nice looking fish and good sport as they're so plentiful and free taking.
 

iainmortimer

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Very true and well pointed out the clear and obvious facts regarding Pink Salmon.
However what would happen If say one year down the line instead of a few hundred a few hundred thousand started entering our rivers, the competition for space and during drought years it would become an issue.
But thankfully we are not anything near that stage yet.

Interesting point that they are regarded as a pest, not to dissimilar to the regard anglers had for our own grilse runs many many moons ago .
From my understanding they spawn successfully alongside many other species on the other side of the Atlantic and so I can’t see their being a direct impact. However, I also believe those are rivers well fed by melting snow in relatively pristine areas rather than our polluted and over abstracted rivers. I would therefore be concerned that high numbers rotting away and so adding additional stress to low and warm water could be a major issue.

Unfortunately I also don’t see how we could selectively remove them with any success to stop that happening eventually. Perhaps our warm water that stresses the Atlantic eggs could have a bigger impact on pinks and so they never get a strong foothold (finhold?).

One benefit could be that if there were greater numbers of pink parr then they would add to the diet of FEB’s. Assuming FEB numbers did not explode as a result, the percentage of Atlantic parr eaten would therefore fall which could be a good thing.
 

petevicar

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From my understanding they spawn successfully alongside many other species on the other side of the Atlantic and so I can’t see their being a direct impact. However, I also believe those are rivers well fed by melting snow in relatively pristine areas rather than our polluted and over abstracted rivers. I would therefore be concerned that high numbers rotting away and so adding additional stress to low and warm water could be a major issue.

Unfortunately I also don’t see how we could selectively remove them with any success to stop that happening eventually. Perhaps our warm water that stresses the Atlantic eggs could have a bigger impact on pinks and so they never get a strong foothold (finhold?).

One benefit could be that if there were greater numbers of pink parr then they would add to the diet of FEB’s. Assuming FEB numbers did not explode as a result, the percentage of Atlantic parr eaten would therefore fall which could be a good thing.
What is FEB?
 

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