Non traditional methods

Beanzy

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Thanks for starting this thread jeorge.

We use bead-head nymphs down here for salmon, but it's as a mechanical aid to getting the fly deep rather than anything to do with catching resident fish. The rivers are very small and have deep pools known as pots where the salmon can lie-up for most of a season, with the fresh fish coming in from summer to January.

How do you observe the feeding behaviour in these fish you have?
 

jeorge

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Beanzy, thanks!
First of all, I have noticed that the salmon actively attacks a fly when grayling is active too. Means, conditions for display of activity of these fishes can be identical. It concerns conditions of water, the river and - 2- concerns possibilities of presentation of a fly.
For me the fact of documenting of interest of a resident and a silver salmon to imitations of insects and influence of conducting on attack frequency was important. I alternated a method of "a wet fly" with "aggressive wet" and catching on the nymph downstream. On reaches, rifts and other places I tested serially 2 or 3 flies, replacing successful and trying the new.


Steams of flies The Relation of number fly effectiveness
grayling to a salmon
T/S

Black Zulu Wet 1: 2 Stable attacks
Orange Partridge Wet 2: 1 Interest is changeable

Red Tag Wet 1: 1 Constantly well
Partridge&Orange Wet 3: 1 The impression is pure grayling

Bead Head Pheasant Tail The nymph 1: 1 Took any fish you located
Olive Sedge Pupa Wet 2: 1 Well, but it is not always constant

March Brown Wet 3: 0 Does not work On the sun
Olive Sedge Pupa Wet 1: 0 Interest is changeable and at grayling

Bead Head Pheasant Tail The nymph 2: 1 Calls biting activization
Partridge&Orange Wet 0: 0 Absence of interest

March Brown Wet 1: 5 during a rain took each fish
Caddis Green Butt Pupa Wet 0: 0 Absence of interest

Brown Bomber Wet 2: 1 Half-heartedly
Green Sedge Wet 2: 1 Languid attacks

Stonefly Nymph The nymph 1: 3 Stable interest
Bead Head Caddis Nymph the nymph 1: 5 Took each localised salmon

Bivisible and silver Dry/wet 1: 1 Stable attacks
Red Tag variant Wet 1: 1 Constantly well

This statistic I got some years ego on Chavanga river, Kola. River is very changeable during a season and it is very interesting not only to land fish but to see what is happend in the water. We may see something in a low clear water, you understand, that the best time to observe wild life is low water summer. I can see reaction of a salmon on my fly directly, as in grayling fishing in my Belarus or Poland rivers. I show my fly and can see fish movement, rising, following and attack. Now I think that salmon can do analysis, observation of a target only in a way trout and grayling do it. And all methods of traditional fishing and all flies can work for salmon. We may go far away from a simple attractor fishing using "salmon" flies, methods and tackles.
 

ispy968

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A very interesting thread, I have caught salmon in Ireland on dry Mayfly on the rivers in June in Low water conditions with bright sunshine, it seems to work better if there is an upstream breeze to put a small wave on the water. I was told by an old ghillie that the wave puts more oxygen into the water which switches the fish on and makes them active.
I have also used a dry Royal Wulff on a size 1 low water iron to get King Salmon in Alaska, very interesting to watch them rise very slowly from maybe 5' 6' down to inspect the fly closely before taking.
 

kolbeinn

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Here in Iceland we had a very long period of drought last summer and somehow this seams to be the norm as the summers here are getting warmer and warmer each year.
This is very frustrating scially when large shoals of salmon are lying in the pool in the gin clear river and are just not taking.

The usual method here in Iceland is to start with a very long leader and a micro fly and stand very far away from the pool in order not to be seen. This often gives results but I would like to mention one method that works very well in situations like mentioned above.
Last summer I was fishing Hrutafjardara a small river on the northern side of Iceland. The pool was packed with salmon and the temperature of the river was well above 16°
After casting every available fly in my box and trying all sort of different methods I remembered one advice I once heard.
That is to fish the pool upstream.
The salmon is in a way lazy as the hot water in the river takes out all spirit from the fish. The lower water levels also means that the salmon lies much closer to the surface and can therefore spot the angler much easier as the angle of its vision is much wider than in normal situations.

Therefore you fish it like trout upstream, that is you stand well below the pool and cast the fly and make sure to strip the line as the fly comes drifting down the pool . By applying this method I managed to hook two salmon last summer after have tried every fly in my box with different methods, stripping, hitching and so on.

The best lesson learned from this is that later that summer I tried this method with a double hand rod on a large river (East Ranga) with a large brass tube where the water level was normal, and it works I hooked a salmon after have fished the pool with more traditional methods.

I believe that fly fishing is all about presenting the fly in order to provoke the fish. If the fly goes the same way through the pool like with "normal casting" the fly becomes a part of the environment. When you think about the amount of flies some salmon manage to see through the season it is a little miracle when the fish decides to go after your fly.

When the fly is presented drifting on the same speed as the running water it all of a sudden becomes something totally different and provocation occurs.

This method is something that I highly recommend as a last resort when everything else is tried or as a first option when water levels are very low.

Tight lines
 

vasil

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Kolbeinn, very interesting thought, sometimes it happens iam confused about the flies and methods, never came up with an idea to land inactive salmon by fishing upsteam. By the way, very interesting thread!
 

jeorge

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Chavanga river experiments

This autumn there was successful way of salmon fishing at the water surface. The Chavanga river water level was low, and fish hid in holes between stones on river main current. It did not react to usual provocative salmon flies, despite that we have reduced their size till 12-14 number. Probably, in crystal-clear water fish perfectly saw all lacks of an artificial bait. Fly deduction in one place, its acceleration upwards against the current or movement across did not interest a salmon. But we have found a way. In places where in the tideway of the river there were many large stones, there was effective a way of provocation of a salmon on becoming wet dry fly. The fly of type CDC sedge after wet remains in a superficial film of water. At a stop of its drift over parking of fish, the fly forms a small hillock of water directly at surfaces. This easy wave is well visible to the fisher and it is possible to supervise fly`s movement.
At the moment of a stop of a fly and hillock occurrence on a surface fish rose from shelter more often and attacked. The cast distance and presentation did not exceed 5-7 meters. Among stones it was possible to approach imperceptibly and to fish carefully all possible shelters. There was a problem of nylon strength. The salmon ignored thick tippets also, as well as the big flies. It was necessary to apply fluoro-tippets 0.20-0.22 in diameter. Diameter of 0.25 has seemed already too rough and appreciable in water. We have lost a part of large fishes, as it is very difficult to land such fish among stones. To such flies I have not noticed any color preferences. Probably, the fact of appearance of a hillock on a water surface was the main thing.
I`ve still problems with my photobucket, I can`t load my photo, I dont know why. Sorry.
 

lhomme

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Hi Jeorge,

looks more like (close range) hitching with a subsurface fly you do there. Must be breathtaking to see a salmon rise to it!:cool:

Try to upload your photo's in your gallery. Click on gallery third in the blue line on top of the page, next click on upload photo, then scroll down and push the button choose a file in your computer (usually : my images), double click right on the photo you have chosen, scroll down and push on the upload/submit button. Take care that your photos are "compressed" before sending (max 100KB), you can do this for each picture in the Microsoft Office Picture Manager of your computer (Modify Pictures - Compress Picture - Web Pages - Save).When you want the picture in a post click on {insert photo from your gallery} right from the post you are writing, right click once on the photo and make sure the field on top of your gallery says : From: Photopost Gallery As: Medium, linked to original Show: All my photos. You can check if your photo is in your post by scrolling down and pushing the Preview Post button.

Regards,
Johan
 

jeorge

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I can work with my albums but I can`t upload new photo in my album!
After uploading the photobucket answer is :

".... We didn't recieve all of your file because of a network problem.

Upload failed for
fish.jpg
Error: Unknown Error
Retry this upload..."

I think I need new registration and new box.
 

lhomme

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Nice picture, Jeorge! Don't go to your albums through User CP, stay in the main menu and try Gallery.

Johan
 

lhomme

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Holy smoke, Jeorge.

Is that Atlantic salmon? Glad you can post pictures, keep them coming! I've got a piggy-bank with the word Chavanga written on installed on my tying desk ! See you in a couple of years;)

Thanks,
Johan
 

jeorge

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Ha! That is gorbusha - Pink salmon, fish was introdused in White and Barenc sea and now is a horror of flyfishermen of Kola peninsula. But it is very nice fish only we need to find write fly.
Here one Atlantic salmon on BH nymph and Gorbusha with weighted nymph too.

Both were landed on BH (tungsten) nymph, not imitative but really fantastic orange + red fly. This combination of colors sometimes is magic, a reason- may be a color of eggs, fish caviar has the same color and all fishes, salmon, trouts, graylings remember it. In this situation we may use a very little fly to fish successfully. It gives us more variants in fishing method choice. I think.
 

jeorge

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Allow me to tell about one amusing way of fishing of a salmon. My cousin who has come back from a trip on the White sea, to the Arkhangelsk region (Russia) has told to me about it Russia. In these deaf places Local residents do not fish on a fly, spinn lure is a problem too. Here always caught a salmon on a worm, threw a sinker and held a nylon in a hand. But technical progress knows no limit. The novelty of last years consists in fishing of a salmon that the hook with worms is located now in a condom. Such vibrating bait on fast waters provokes a salmon on attack. Remains not clear, what role is played now by worm? Whether it is necessary to save and watch tightness of a condom?
How often it is necessary for changing?

In a photo the local resident who throws a bait. He uses an ordinary can as spinning reel. The nylon easily comes off it at cast. The fisher keeps a bait on a current, and then, retreive a bait, reeling up nylon on bank.
 

lhomme

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What a story, Jeorge! This shows the inventiveness of locals presumably not fishing for fun, but for food:). Does this mean we're going to have to tie "condom flies" when we come to Kola?:D:D:D

Cheers,
Johan:guinness:
 

jeorge

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Hi Johan! Yes, sometimes we need to open a door in a sexual life of salmon!:)
 

jeorge

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My son has told about this case to me. For one of days there was a hutch off small mayflies. Everywhere were visible traces of graylings which attacked emerging nymphs and insects on a water surface. We have found suitable flies, I was fishing wet variants, the son caught on dryfly . In this place water moved from coastal stones in a direction to the river centre. The majority of graylings attacked flies when they moved in the same direction, from coast to the centre. We tried to simulate both an insect and its natural movement. It was interesting that here on depth of 1/2 metre a CDC may fly #18 was attacked by silver salmon. After short struggle salmon has break a tippet and has left. In my opinion, in a fishing technique was very little provocative, we fished and tried to imitate as much as possible to present real insects.

 

vasil

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Hi Jeorge!! The water level seems to be very low, which month is it on the pictures? How does it effect activity of the fish there? Thanks!!
 

jeorge

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Hi Vasil! It was the middle of August last summer, extremely hot and low water for all Kola peninsula and for Europe too. You know, fresh salmon stopped it`s run from sea, but resident fish was very active. It was surprise, but in 20 - 22 degr. warm water salmon was angry and fishing was excellent. May be low level water provokes fish. But trouts disappeared, and I saw it only in September when new sea trouts came to the river.
 

jeorge

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I always assumed that the salmon is interested in details of red or orange colour. Here again on a photo the fantasy nymph prepared for grayling has brightly-red tail. But often the salmon chooses flies as well as grayling , therefore red details are at all unessential. But it is necessary to consider that natural colours of a bait assume natural presentation of a fly, the correct method of fishing and corresponding structure of tackle is necessary..

 
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