out dated flies

whitehorses

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
4,061
Location
ireland
when flies go out of fashion is it only with the angler or the fish ?, obviously the fish today wont have seen it or maybe only on the odd occasion ts been used ,
how many times have you heard thats an oldie ,classic ,used it years ago, an old favorite etc etc,surly if it worked then it works now ,
i know some patterns evolve ie grow legs eyes , and end up being variants of some sort or other,
do patterns just stop working one day on a lough or do they just fade out of popularity
 

taffy1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
12,051
Location
Well within my comfort zone
Have you tried an "out dated fly" recently? Pheasant Tail Nymph, Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear Nymph maybe? Just to name a couple of old tried & tested patterns. They will all still work, it's the magazines etc. catching more anglers than anglers catching fish. EG. Here's today's must-have fly pattern, you'd be a fool not to have it among your arsenal...
 
Last edited:

anzac

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
2,382
Location
Terra Firma
Let's look at this from the anglers' perspective. Is there a use by date on a fly? No. Are anglers subject to, and influenced by, trends and fashion? Yes.

Now let's look at this from the fish's perspective. Does the fly look like something I -- as a fish --would want to eat? Yes. Am I -- as a fish -- influenced by trends, fashion, or much of anything other than appetite? No.

More importantly, does it even matter IF the fish take the 'out-dated' fly? NOPE.
 

whitehorses

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
4,061
Location
ireland
Have you tried an "out dated fly" recenrly? Pheasant Tail Nymph, Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear Nymph maybe? Just to name a couple of old tried & tested patterns. They will all still work, it's the magazines etc. catching more anglers than anglers catching fish. EG. Here's today's must-have fly pattern, you'd be a fool not to have it among your arsenal...
thats what im saying if they work then they should work now ,how come they fall out of favour then
Let's look at this from the anglers' perspective. Is there a use by date on a fly? No. Are anglers subject to, and influenced by, trends and fashion? Yes.

Now let's look at this from the fish's perspective. Does the fly look like something I -- as a fish --would want to eat? Yes. Am I -- as a fish -- influenced by trends, fashion, or much of anything other than appetite? No.

More importantly, does it even matter IF the fish take the 'out-dated' fly? NOPE.
if the fish take the outdated fly ,of course it matters ,it means it still works and proves fish have no fashion sense,
 

whitehorses

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
4,061
Location
ireland
Used to be my top fly in the 80s.
Tied one on at Brenig this week and caught a fish in tricky conditions,
you say it used to be your top fly, why did it fall out of favour with you what/why was it replaced ,did the change catch you more fish or did you just simply have more faith and confidence with the new replacement and utelised it a bit more ,
obviosly if you dont swim your favourite fly as much ,it wont catch ,especially sitting in your box ,
then to return to it in a tricky situation and it still out performed the newer ones ?
 

Vintage Badger

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
1,266
Location
Cheshire
As someone once said, "flies have caught more anglers than they ever have fish", and I think that's very true.

How many of us have several boxes of the damned things when about two dozen patterns is probably all anyone would genuinely need to catch trout or salmon on any water in just about any conditions. But then again, which two dozen... so we keep on buying/tying till we think we've found them! No wonder we end up with a number of flies of patterns that haven't seen water for a decade or more.
 

wjg

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
295
Location
PEI
The old school Renegade fly came up in a discussion the other day. Devised in the 1920's and still effective. Easy to tie, imitates many things, but hard to sell to "technical fishermen".
I meet an older gentleman (75+?) on the stream occasionally. The only fly he ties and carries is a renegade. He will fish it dry, wet and sunk with a steel bead slipped on the leader ahead of tying on the fly. Best part for me is he has forgotten the name and calls them Orangutans. He always out fishes me.
 
D

Deleted member 93217

Guest
I don't think there is really such a thing as an outdated fly. Traditional and modern might be better terms or perhaps traditional and modified. I still have to find a better fly than the PTN, I add beads, flash, hotspots etc but it's still just a PTN
 

bonefishblues

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
3,880
Location
Near Bicester, Oxon
Really? Think that through for a moment.

Now tell us, how many fish are caught on flies anglers aren't using?
I sense you get my point :)

For instance, in my division, Permit were only capable of being caught on crab patterns - that was the confident assertion (usually Del's Merkin, which was as close to a default as there was). Why? Because that's what people used, because that was all you could catch on.

Unfortunately nobody told the somewhat isolated Guides of Cuba (free, largely, from US influence) so they were merrily catching 'em on all sorts of things, and most importantly, catching them on patterns that you pulled as opposed to left to be inspected and rejected. Now there is a much wider range of patterns, all of which catch permit, simply because they are being used.

I'm not as 'up' on freshwater as I used to be, but for sure, what's in vogue will be catching the lions' share of the fish - simply by virtue of being used.
 

Elwyman

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
849
Location
North Wales
you say it used to be your top fly, why did it fall out of favour with you what/why was it replaced ,did the change catch you more fish or did you just simply have more faith and confidence with the new replacement and utelised it a bit more ,
obviosly if you dont swim your favourite fly as much ,it wont catch ,especially sitting in your box ,
then to return to it in a tricky situation and it still out performed the newer ones ?
Good question, main reason I suppose is that I moved onto other waters where buzzers and other nymphs were more productive. I rarely fished Brenig or large stillwaters in the 90s and 00s.
I remember I had a day on Rutland in the 80s and the fish went mad for an Invicta, but unfortunately they kept breaking me.
 

unclealec

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
1,163
Location
Manchester
Good question, main reason I suppose is that I moved onto other waters where buzzers and other nymphs were more productive. I rarely fished Brenig or large stillwaters in the 90s and 00s.
I remember I had a day on Rutland in the 80s and the fish went mad for an Invicta, but unfortunately they kept breaking me.
That's the problem with those Invictas. They put up a hell of a fight.
 

Gdog

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
993
Location
Dublin
I have recently rediscovered the Invicta as an ideal drowning sedge imitation. Not sure that it ever went "out of fashion", but it is an old stalwart.
I caught three browns on an Invicta fished on the point yesterday, I catch trout on it regularly in sizes 10 to 14 from July to September on loughs with sedge hatches. I spotted 3 different types of sedge yesterday between 11.00 AM and 4.00 PM, if I fished until dusk I might have seen a few more.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top