out dated flies

Cap'n Fishy

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I don't think anyone is suggesting that a certain pattern should not be used because it is outdated. It is more a case of identifying which patterns never get used any more, perhaps with a view to digging them out or tying some up and giving them a new lease of life? :unsure:
 

Beacon Beige

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Hiding in your wife's wardrobe!
Older Patterns will catch trout just as well as new patterns , Old Marjan Fratnik patterns catch trout everyday all over the Globe!
Flies are only seen as outdated because Anglers tend to stick to newer patterns but I can assure you a Box of decrepit ancient wet flies will catch fish all day long!


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PaulD

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Since buying this old Wheatley fly box full of traditional, river-pattern dry flies, it's become one of my most treasured fly fishing possessions:
Old fly boxes and their contents are often things of great beauty and objects to be treasured, here's one of my favourites . . .
2020-12-05 07.40.14.jpg


I have a great love of fishing the Border Streams and often when I do, I dip into a box of flies designed by the Reverend Powell, Vicar of Munslow. Flies like the Baby Sunfly, Buzz Olive, Orange Otter and the Paragon. Even the unlikely looking Ermine Moth on warm evenings. As with all flies, on their day they're good, very, very good.
 

anzac

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An other reason that some old patterns dissapear might be that some materials are not available ore allowed any more ( e.g. of protected animals).
To which one might ask why not make the old, vintage pattern with look alike new materials?

I doubt the fish will notice that the fly has been tied using a bit of pigeon feather instead of one from the now extinct Dodo.
 

david barnes

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To which one might ask why not make the old, vintage pattern with look alike new materials?

I doubt the fish will notice that the fly has been tied using a bit of pigeon feather instead of one from the now extinct Dodo.
That’s one of my pet hates about fly fishing and tying in general. I’m relatively new to the pastime and it’s been a steep learning curve.
So what if you don’t have the second primary off a mature exotic male bird of paradise? Tie and fish with what you want and have to hand.
Far too much snobbery, but luckily for my own interest, it’s the saltwater that drawers me and there’s very little in the way of history or tradition to get hung up on, thankfully.
 

Elwyman

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Since buying this old Wheatley fly box full of traditional, river-pattern dry flies, it's become one of my most treasured fly fishing possessions:

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Until reading this thread I never thought to check for a 'best before date', so tonight I looked at the back of the box and found this: :eek:

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You'll be pleased to know that I put the box and its contents straight in the bin. Thank goodness I realised, imagine how much time I could have wasted on an otherwise perfectly good stream by fishing one of those stale flies!

;)
A thing of beauty, I'd happily look through them on a winter's night and dream of the river bank. I've heard of them all except the Usk Dog's Body.
 

Vintage Badger

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A thing of beauty, I'd happily look through them on a winter's night and dream of the river bank. I've heard of them all except the Usk Dog's Body.
Thanks, I think so too, so many traditional old UK river patterns in there, and yes, I do just that, usually while sipping a good malt or a glass of port. :)

Apparently, the Usk Dog's Body got its name as the chap who tied it (Harry Powell in 1924, who often fished the Usk) used fur from a farmer's dog to dub the body. It's still available as a pattern today but seems to have lost the Usk prefix and is more often just called the Dog's Body.
 

The Endrick Spider

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Here's the story of the Dog's Body taken from Michael Leighton's excellent little book, "Trout Flies of Shropshire and the Welsh Borderlands."

View attachment 43518
Although not what you would call being much of a reader I do love reading a little history about the flies that we fish and how they came about. It all goes towards making our sport all the more interesting. When out on the loch, in my case anyway, it is not just a matter of putting on a fly and hoping for the best. I like to know not only the reason for putting that fly on the cast in the first place, how and when it should be fished. If more of our fellow anglers were to do this, instead of just taking pot luck, it is quite possible that they would catch more fish.
 

shpeil

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Has anyone really used any of those in recent years??? :unsure:
I rediscovered the original/white baby doll. I'd had a couple in my box for years and never used them. On a slow day I tied one on the point and stripped it back. Couldn't keep the fish off it. Strangely, I have not used it since...!
 

whitehorses

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On what was proving to be a hard day on one of my local stocked stillwaters this week, with this thread in mind I had looked out half a dozen old wets, a cast of a black penell, a mallard & claret and a watsons fancy landed me two nice trout.
watsons its a greatt fly for the end of season ,
i use a pennell all year long
mallard and claret great on a darkish day
if these classic flys are deemed outdated my fly box needs a thourough seen to ,i would of thought they were a staple in anyones box ,
 

JoeOh

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To which one might ask why not make the old, vintage pattern with look alike new materials?

I doubt the fish will notice that the fly has been tied using a bit of pigeon feather instead of one from the now extinct Dodo.

Alternatively, perhaps knock up a fly using the rarest / most exotic materials and as for a name... how about ' The Peckem Packham'

Sorry....?
 

JoeOh

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My first fly caught Trout was from a small lough about 48 years ago on a dry 'Cow Dung' fly.
I haven't used one since... Should tie a few up as the natural hasn't gone away
 

BobP

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From memory they had to be new, they stopped working when they got grubby. Not used one for 30 years or more.
That made them the pro fly dresser's dream fly. Cheap as chips to make as a ball of fluorescent white wool enabled hundreds of flies to be tied and a constant rapid turnover to keep producing bright, clean BD's at the rate of 1 every 2 minutes.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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My first fly caught Trout was from a small lough about 48 years ago on a dry 'Cow Dung' fly.
I haven't used one since... Should tie a few up as the natural hasn't gone away

The thing about the traditional cowdung pattern (if I remember correctly) is that it is a wet fly, is it not? The only naturals that trout eat are static and lying in the surface. So, any time they are on the water, me and my mates will be fishing dry flies for them. An olive or 'dirty yellow' half-hog is a decent pattern...

Olive-half-hog_4941.jpg


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