Outfit for upland lake recommendations

shropshire_lad

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Too far away from the wild places!
I'm sure this type of question has been asked numerous times but what would folks here recommend as an ideal set up for bank fishing upland lakes/lochs these days? I'm talking about small Welsh mountain lakes but probably equally applicable to Scottish lochs.

I say "these days" as back when I started things were generally heavier. I used an 11' rod with No 7 lines, the theory being the 11' allowed "dibbling" the top dropper and a No 7 line was needed to combat the wind.

However, the trend is lighter these days and I hear a lot of people taking about No. 5 being an ideal weight. Having tried a beautiful lightweight 9' No 5 outfit recently, I'm wondering if this would be a good choice?
 

noddy299

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Phil I do more or less all my fishing with a 9' #5 onki. Go upto the #7 for reservoir or if its blowing a real hoolie. Or step it down to the 7' #3 for the really small streams. Changing tactics and mindset is more important than the stick in your hand I reckon.

If it was competition fishing. Different ballgame, percentages and marginal gains matter but if you are just having fun then why spend a fortune (and get the earache off the mrs) on having a stock of a thousand rods 3 inches longer than the next. Not that I don't have...10 or 12 maybe anyways of course.
 

Naefearjustbeer

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I use a 10 foot 7 weight for everything, bit heavy for delicate presentation of dry flies but I have found adding an airflo tapered leader makes a difference. But I also use my rod on small rivers for salmon fishing so I think a 6 weight would be too light.

Sent from my ANE-LX1 using Tapatalk
 

Wee Jimmy

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I use 9’6 or 10’ #5 weights for bankfishing on those types of water Phil.I prefer the shorter one for dry fly work and the longer rod for pulling but I wouldn’t feel stuck for both methods with either of them.
 

Scotty Mitchell

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Thanks chaps, very useful advice. What about line profiles? I get the impression WF's in various profiles are pretty used for everything on lakes these days? Are there any occasions when a DT is preferred?
For the kind of fishing you are intending doing with it Phil, I'd definitely go with a WF. Snowbee XS type profile.
 

JCP

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Is this for banking it,boating it or both ? Looks like have it covered so far.Do like a DT for dries on a fair weather day especially from the boat.Once again a personal preference and not essential.Spare spool covers the need.DT handles sweet with minimal effort within normal dry fly ranges where can still see the flies :D

JP
 

shropshire_lad

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Too far away from the wild places!
Is this for banking it,boating it or both ? Looks like have it covered so far.Do like a DT for dries on a fair weather day especially from the boat.Once again a personal preference and not essential.Spare spool covers the need.DT handles sweet with minimal effort within normal dry fly ranges where can still see the flies :D

JP
Bank fishing generally.
 

Fuffa

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I would be tempted with a sunray short head for such situations..it says for limited back cast space and shoots all out. I would think good for casting into the wind. For 4wt and upwards website seems to say. Vids on his website. But sold out. But he likes a 10ft rod
 

ohanzee

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Thanks chaps, very useful advice. What about line profiles? I get the impression WF's in various profiles are pretty used for everything on lakes these days? Are there any occasions when a DT is preferred?
That's a good question rarely asked, a heather incline behind is pretty common so I don't go beyond a 40' head.
9' 5 line, mostly dries, predominantly wet fishers tend to go a bit heavier.
 
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ohanzee

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I think what you are comfortable using is more important than any specific size or weight, when you head up a hill you rarely get to see what a loch looks like in advance, part of the reason I like it, you figure out where to start every time you arrive at a new loch, working with what you have is part of it, its basic simple stuff in the main, a good walk with the anticipation of a thing hard won, catching completes the mission.

Carry a head torch, you will generally be back by dark but the one time you don't can get a bit hairy.
 
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