Pasture pumps

williamn1

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Aug 10, 2016
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Hello out there. With the objective of creating circumstances where livestock can be excluded from the watercourse, our club is considering possibilities. Does anyone have a view (from experience) about pasture pumps or other arrangements? Or is there a better forum to post this in?
Bill.
 

diawl bach

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I'd contact the River Restoration Centre for some info but there's a fair bit on the net.

This leaflet's good, it gives a cost/benefit analysis of the various options, prices may not be current but still - LINK
 

ejw

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We got a grant to install a borehole and pump to keep cattle out of the river. Worked well, within two seasons the farmer kept all stock off the field and didn't use the system again ? He had to pay for water abstraction !!
Eddie
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Does anyone have a view (from experience) about pasture pumps or other arrangements?
Bill.

Some of the farmers around the Somerset Levels use them were the banks of the drains are high and steep with the danger of stock falling in and not being able to get out. Even without fencing the cattle had the sense to use the pasture pumps rather than try to scramble down the banks to their doom. I bet sheep would still fall in and drown though!

Hydraulic rams are very good and will run for decades without even being looked at (I've never seen one under forty years old!) but are a much more expensive option.

I guess the simple pasture pumps wouldn't need an abstraction license?
 
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williamn1

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Thanks to all respondents. Are there any more views/experience out there?
Bill.

- - - Updated - - -

Thanks to all respondents. Are there any more views/experience out there?
Bill.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Thanks to all respondents. Are there any more views/experience out there?
Bill.


Probably not. Conservation and Fishery Restoration threads rarely achieve the length of those devoted to the cost of rods or the merits of different tippets. It does leave one wondering about the priorities of most anglers.
 

boisker

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Thanks to all respondents. Are there any more views/experience out there?
Bill.

- - - Updated - - -

Thanks to all respondents. Are there any more views/experience out there?
Bill.

They work fine for small herds of cattle, but not much good for larger numbers, the drinking process is to slow and you would need loads of pasture pumps.
In the right circumstance they work well, we have successfully used them in a small number of fields, but have also stopped using them in one instance when the grazier was concerned about cattle access to water; increased risk of dehydration isn’t great in summer and there is an increased risk of cattle getting “boisterous” with each other to get access to the water.
We have successfully used a ram pump on a couple of sites (these are nature reserves), but you need enough head (or fall in river height) for them to work. But if the height the water needs to be pumped isn’t high they can be a great option (the higher you need to pump the water the greater head you need) , you can pump the water to a reservoir tank; if you put the tank at the highest point you can then gravity feed to troughs across a number of fields. This would def need EA permission as you would need to have the header structure in the river.
You can also get solar pumps, to pump up from the river/stream direct to a trough or feeder reservoir; we’ve just started using these in a couple of places, so I have less experience of them at this time; but feedback from elsewhere has been good.
 

Milvus

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Mar 15, 2009
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Agree with the previous poster. No good for dairy or larger beef herds.
Drinking bays are an option, they will reduce poaching, but obviously concentrate the issues to one point. Worth getting some good stone as a base around the drinking bay to stop mud being churned up.
Solar pumps also worth looking at, may need an abstraction permit if the are capable of taking more than 20m3 a day, but damage and clogging an issue in spatey rivers.
 

williamn1

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Aug 10, 2016
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Thanks Milvus. Are you saying that dairy cattle are usually more boisterous? I'm just wondering why pasture pumps would be less suitable - even for maybe only 20 cattle.
 
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