Photos of Fish

krikau27

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2012
Messages
245
Caught these 2 seatrouts yesterday. They were released again.
622487c81cc5c7faef7155d566cb5550.jpg

ca7868e0a178f0df89d2ce01dcbb82cb.jpg
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
A sequence of a Rainbow rising, unfortunately I failed to nail the focus:eek:mg: User error! Really frustrated when I got back home and downloaded them.
Paul





 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Great capture just the same Paul. What focusing method were you using?

Col

I can't remember, I'll have to try and find the original files. I think I was trying out a polarising filter for the first time, not sure if that would interfere with the sensitivity of the AF servo tracking! Having said that I was probably in panic mode and still on AF one shot :eek:mg:

Paul
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2008
Messages
30,613
Location
Embra
I can't remember, I'll have to try and find the original files. I think I was trying out a polarising filter for the first time, not sure if that would interfere with the sensitivity of the AF servo tracking! Having said that I was probably in panic mode and still on AF one shot :eek:mg:

Paul

Aye, AF 'One Shot' probably focused on the fish as it came towards you, so its nose was in front of the focal plane when the shutter fired. The polariser costing 2 stops of light would probably slow it down a bit as well.

Were you using a Canon SLR? Canon disable AF on all except the pro SLRs at apertures dimmer than f5.6 (or f8 just for centre point on 5DIII and 7DII). However, they need to know what the f-stop is - which they will if you fit a x1.4 or x2 TC. However, if you fit a polariser or ND filter, they don't know what you've done and continue to try and achieve AF in poor light conditions. As you'll know, when it is very dim - such as indoors - they just hunt back and forth without ever achieving AF.

However, one way to get round this is to use Live View. Use it without the real exposure simulation turned on. That way it gives you a nice bright live view on the LCD display. If you engage AF, it will do its damnedest to get AF lock for you. It won't be quick, but it's amazing what it can do if you give it a couple of seconds. I was doing a waterfall shot last week with a 10-stop ND filter on. I could hardly see a blummin' thing in the viewfinder. I switched to Live View, which gave me a great view of the scene. I moved the AF area to a nice contrasty part of the scene, pressed AF start, at which point it wobbled about a bit before giving me the green light and the confirmation beep. :thumbs:

Useful way to focus in the dark. :p

Col
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Aye, AF 'One Shot' probably focused on the fish as it came towards you, so its nose was in front of the focal plane when the shutter fired. The polariser costing 2 stops of light would probably slow it down a bit as well.

Were you using a Canon SLR? Canon disable AF on all except the pro SLRs at apertures dimmer than f5.6 (or f8 just for centre point on 5DIII and 7DII). However, they need to know what the f-stop is - which they will if you fit a x1.4 or x2 TC. However, if you fit a polariser or ND filter, they don't know what you've done and continue to try and achieve AF in poor light conditions. As you'll know, when it is very dim - such as indoors - they just hunt back and forth without ever achieving AF.

However, one way to get round this is to use Live View. Use it without the real exposure simulation turned on. That way it gives you a nice bright live view on the LCD display. If you engage AF, it will do its damnedest to get AF lock for you. It won't be quick, but it's amazing what it can do if you give it a couple of seconds. I was doing a waterfall shot last week with a 10-stop ND filter on. I could hardly see a blummin' thing in the viewfinder. I switched to Live View, which gave me a great view of the scene. I moved the AF area to a nice contrasty part of the scene, pressed AF start, at which point it wobbled about a bit before giving me the green light and the confirmation beep. :thumbs:

Useful way to focus in the dark. :p

Col

Thanks for the feedback and the great tips! I never used Live Mode, looks like I'll have to bury my nose in the manual again!

I was using a 7D Mk1. I'm sure I just had it set up all wrong, I wasn't expecting the shot and just started clicking away, probably concentrating too much on the turning the polarizing filter, well that's my excuse anyway:whistle:

I plan to go back to the same spot this summer, prepared this time! And if I can bring myself to stop fishing when the fish are rising I'll post the results.

Cheers
Paul
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2008
Messages
30,613
Location
Embra
I was using a 7D Mk1...

Here's another good thing you can do with your 7D that comes in useful if you are in One Shot AF and you suddenly want Servo AF...

If you don't use the depth of field preview button much for showing depth of field preview, you can re-assign it to be a toggle button between One Shot and Servo AF. So, if you are in One Shot AF, press and hold the DoF button and presto, you are in Servo. If you are in Servo and you want One Shot, press and hold and you are in One Shot.

It's not brilliant on the 7D mkI, because it's on the left side as you hold the camera, so you need to change your hold with your left hand to hold it down. They realised it would be much handier on the other side, and on the 5DIII (and I'm guessing the 7DII) the button is on the right, so you can easily reach it with your right hand 3rd finger.

Col
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Here's another good thing you can do with your 7D that comes in useful if you are in One Shot AF and you suddenly want Servo AF...

If you don't use the depth of field preview button much for showing depth of field preview, you can re-assign it to be a toggle button between One Shot and Servo AF. So, if you are in One Shot AF, press and hold the DoF button and presto, you are in Servo. If you are in Servo and you want One Shot, press and hold and you are in One Shot.

It's not brilliant on the 7D mkI, because it's on the left side as you hold the camera, so you need to change your hold with your left hand to hold it down. They realised it would be much handier on the other side, and on the 5DIII (and I'm guessing the 7DII) the button is on the right, so you can easily reach it with your right hand 3rd finger.

Col

Thanks, great tip again, I'll give that a try and let you know how I get on.

Cheers
Paul
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
A couple of Grayling pics. They proved too difficult for me to tempt with the fly in the low clear water, probably more to do with my presentation than the conditions, so I just sat back watched and snapped a few shots. Looking forward to the challenge of trying to catch them this autumn.

Paul





 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Thanks Cap'n Fishy,

Although I was quite disappointed with the top picture as although I shot it at ISO 100 there was a lot of noise in the picture, (had to do some work in photoshop) maybe because of the polarising filter? or could be that I need the mirror cleaning? I haven't had it cleaned since buying the camera.:eek:

Cheers
Paul
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2008
Messages
30,613
Location
Embra
... although I shot it at ISO 100 there was a lot of noise in the picture, (had to do some work in photoshop)

Do you mean the sensor needs cleaning? The mirror will be out the way of the light when it comes through. Dust on the sensor shows up as a few isolated 'dust bunnies', rather than noise. I sometimes see noise at ISO 100 - rather depends on how uniform the background is - the more uniform, the more easy it is for noise to show up.

However, the main thing that introduces noise is if you have to tweak the exposure, contrast, brightness, etc a fair bit in RAW processing and even more if you post-process JPEGs. If you've done work in Photoshop, I'll wager that is the source of the noise. ;)

Col
 

jameswaine

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
5,749
Location
Co. Durham
Lovely shots. :thumbs:

In my limited experience, I'd say that filters can often add that grainy film over the top of your images, particularly if you zoom in heavily on the RAW. I've found that even the higher end filters can do this - Hoya for example.
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Do you mean the sensor needs cleaning?

Col

Sorry yes I mean the sensor. The noise was already visible on the RAW file, it wasn't as sharp as I was expecting. I probably over cooked it in photoshop as I usually do, which doesn't help!

Cheers
Paul
 

snailer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
140
Location
Vienna, Austria
Lovely shots. :thumbs:

In my limited experience, I'd say that filters can often add that grainy film over the top of your images, particularly if you zoom in heavily on the RAW. I've found that even the higher end filters can do this - Hoya for example.

Thanks jameswaine,

It is cropped as they were rising as always just out of range!

Cheers
Paul
 

Latest posts

Top