Playing a fish

aenoon

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 12, 2009
Messages
13,526
Location
Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
You probably get better grip on a muddy bank wearing condoms on your feet in place of those Hunters as well...

Unless of course they were the ribbed and studded ones!:):whistle::whistle:
Think they were called "royal hunters"???:eek:mg::eek:mg:


regards
bert

---------- Post added at 11:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:03 PM ----------

Utter bollox.

Try hand lining a bonefish.

Even bigger bollox

Or A tarpon.
I've run out of expletives.

Now move on to a permit.


regards
bert
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
48,850
I don't play fish off the reel, especially the big ones, unless there is time to safely wind in the slack which for me is generally just before landing, but this needs qualified by the size of the fish, biggest I'm ever going to see is 5 maybe 6 pounds on a rare occasion, don't get me wrong if there was an opportune moment I'd do a bit of winding to clear the feet but I'd rather have the control I get with holding the line than a drag.

Update: ok bonefish - drag.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
48,850
Bit more than the hand can apply, unless of course you like serious line burn of course!

OK, I understand most statements are made relating to the fish we intercept here in UK, but please dont hit me with the carte blanche ideas some seem to have.


regards
bert

You totally cheated there:D
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
7,283
Try hand lining a bonefish.



Or A tarpon.

I live in the world of trout. Biggest I've caught was 12lb. No problem hand lining.

I've not seen the backing on my reel since I loaded the line on - if you can't stop a truot before the end of your line, you're using the wrong gear or technique. But I can imagine that hand lining that stuff with 30lb salmon on running downstream is another kettle of fish.
 
Last edited:

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,598
Location
Wiltshire
I live in the world of trout. Biggest I've caught was 12lb. No problem hand lining.

I've not seen the backing on my reel since I loaded the line on - if you can't stop a truot before the end of your line, you're using the wrong gear or technique. But I can imagine that hand lining that stuff with 30lb salmon on running downstream is another kettle of fish.

All I can say to that is "come on down." You'll see your backing. In your case if you haven't seen it in many moons after loading the fly line it'll probably be flapping in the breeze.

I am not alone in experiencing large trout from a certain reservoir bolting to the horizon. You can check this for yourself by reading others' comments on the fighting qualities of those fish. You don't have to believe me - you won't regardless - but you might take heed of other people.
 

Mr Notherone

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
4,548
Location
Monmouthshire
I mostly fish small and medium rivers and I nearly always play trout and grayling in the hand. Ocassionaly with a larger fish I may use the reel but only if there's little line out already, I never faf about trying to get the line on the reel.

When I'm on a small still water, I let the fish decide, I never wind on yards of line just to get the fish on the reel. If it happens naturally, fair enough.
 

lawrenceh_w

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2007
Messages
589
Location
Shinfield, Berkshire
All I can say to that is "come on down." You'll see your backing. In your case if you haven't seen it in many moons after loading the fly line it'll probably be flapping in the breeze.

I am not alone in experiencing large trout from a certain reservoir bolting to the horizon. You can check this for yourself by reading others' comments on the fighting qualities of those fish. You don't have to believe me - you won't regardless - but you might take heed of other people.

Because of the waters I fish (small to medium-sized rivers) I tend to play fish by hand. Occasionally if I'm fishing at close range (so not much line out) and a decent fish takes then they can shoot off upstream and take line off the reel. That's about the only time I've used my drag ... still never seen the backing but then I don't fish reservoirs (for trout) but I can imagine an over-wintered rainbow could head to the horizon at a rapid rate of knots :D ...
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,598
Location
Wiltshire
Lawrence,

Indeed it can. I've had many fish run 50, 60 or more yards, and they aren't THAT big. 4-6lbs, but fit as a butcher's dog. My standard set-up is a 10' #5 rod and I like to see it BEND!

That said I've had Austrian grayling go hurtling off downriver 25 yards and if you can't follow then it's a right game getting them back again. They are most unsporting - they just hang there in the fast water and you have to pull to the limit to get them upstream.
 

banksy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
99
Having lost fish myself by treading on the line or getting it tangled around my bootlaces, I can see the attraction of the automatic reel, such as Mitchell used to make.
At the touch of a lever, loose line is instantly put back on the reel.

Have they lost their popularity?
 

haggstock

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Messages
3,951
Location
Halifax
Certainly forum member Hydropsyched uses one to great effect, haven't seen him on here recently. Hope to see him on the water in the new season.

I'm pretty sure that after trying various brands the one that stood up to the real life rigours of lots of fishing (and lots of fish caught ) was a Swiss made Fulgor.
 

Clunk

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 24, 2008
Messages
1,002
Location
Ingolstadt
My experience (on a river) is that if I hook a good trout say from from 2lbs upwards I'll get the the line on the spool as quick as possible. Usually the trout, if carefully played, will pause for long enough at some point to let me to keep the line taught on one side and reel in the slack while it susses things out. That gets me ready for the it's next move. You can now use the drag as it is intended, to allow the trout to move shorter distances under load while tiring it out. This is when changing the angle of the rod really gets them confused.

If the bankside allows then a walk backwards gets the line taught quicker then reel your way back to a comfortable distance. If a big fish gets particularly upset and is not for stopping let it take up the slack for you. If heading downstream, then I go with it and IMO your asking for extra trouble with line dragging beneath you. Bad form.

The best anglers I know get the line on the reel ASAP, and that's good enough for me.
 

BrownieBasher

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 5, 2008
Messages
2,808
Location
Hampshire
An ex-boss of mine used to cut them off his guests' wellies if they fished his estate. "You'll thank me when you hook a big 'un!" he'd say.

The look on his friends' faces was priceless. :D

Lewis, ever since i lost that fish i have ripped the straps off the damn wellies! - In fact i have taken to wearing other brands now, but that's a different story!
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,598
Location
Wiltshire
It's not a bad idea. Fly lines have a mind of their own and they know when you are stuck into a good fish that that is the time to snag around the buckle. ANY loose line lying around is a trap and sooner or later.......!

No good whining then!
 

JCP

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
3,075
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Having lost fish myself by treading on the line or getting it tangled around my bootlaces, I can see the attraction of the automatic reel, such as Mitchell used to make.
At the touch of a lever, loose line is instantly put back on the reel.

Have they lost their popularity?

Those Mitchells were great.Still have a pair from the 70's.Just became noticeably heavy as lighter rods evolved and larger abor reels came to the fore.They worked a treat especially sea trout fishing at night.:D Not allowed out after dark so much these days:eek:mg:

Best JP
 

tobesfish

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2014
Messages
131
My experience is mainly of UK, SW rivers that have a few powerful rainbows sstocked in there. I only ever started playing off the reel once I bought myself a half decent reel (Orvis Access, upgrade from Sonik ST4) and it's a pleasure to use. In terms of drag, it makes sense to me that it is set so it lets out line just below the breaking strain of your tippet, then you won't get break-offs.

To get used to it, start off hand lining as usual then tuck line just off the spool under your rod-hand pinkie and hold the line that goes to the first ring between index finger and thumb so you have a bight of your loose line in between. You can then wind with your reel hand (I'm right-handed so I hold rod with my right and reel with my left but accept others do different) until all the slack is taken up. With the drag now set looser than breaking strain, as long as you don't block the reel handle you can be confident (relatively) you won't get broken on a lunge from the bigguns.
 
Top