Polarized sunglasses for fly fishing

LukeNZ

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+1 for Smith.

I have used a pair of Smith chromo-pop polarised for the last few years, they are getting a bit scratched now, so I will start looking for and trying out a new pair of Smith’s over the coming couple of weeks. There are some new lenses and models available since I got my last ones, which have been excellent.

🙃
 

bonefishblues

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Not sure if we've missed a major brand between us, comrades, as is usually the way in these sunglasses threads!

In summary OP, at whatever your budget is, there's a pair for you, but it really is a very personal choice.

The point O M W makes is an important one - fit is king IMHO too. A cheaper pair that fit you well will always trump a pair of MauiCostagetismiths at a billionty-six quid that let light in behind the lens.
 

Paul_B

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I use £3 clip ons from ebay on my prescription specs. I have grey, green, brown, and yellow lenses and change them according to brightness. The yellow lenses are great in dull conditions, the brown when it's really bright. Would recommend.

I feel ripped of now, I get clip-ons from the opticians for a tenner.

I have bifocal glasses for fishing as my distance is ok but I need a bit of help for hook threading and its so easy to lift the clip-ons.

I have the yellow lens type but they're varifocal and used very little.
 

Paul_B

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A hook in the eye can blind a guy, as can too much sun

As fishing people we get a lot of sun and we get double sun due to the reflection from the water, I've had a new lens fitted to my eye due to sun damage and I also have sun damage to my face, so don't forget the sun cream, unless you really feel lucky.
 

Mrtrout

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I bought a pair of Costa Sunrise on here two years ago, they were very reasonable compared to new ones, I must say they are great, I didn’t realise what I was missing until I started to use them.
S.
 

Paul_B

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If you're worried about your eyes, get them tested, read with one eye at a time

1631536627432.jpeg
 

AndrewL

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I had genuine Optix HLT cormorants for many years util the scratches got too great. Got some so called new Optix from fleabay but doubt they were to real thing and didn't do it for me vision wise or comfort. So, I now use an old pair of Maui Jims. I am very happy with them and everyone who has had a look through them at the water has been highly impressed. Also, used Serengetis and they also do the job well. With both brands there is a wide choice of lenses for various applications which can be a bit daunting. Either way, they are very relaxing on the eyes and not just for fishing. I wouldn't be without them for driving, even in not so sunny conditions.
 

Overmiwadrers

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just out of interest a month or two ago I bit the bullet and purchased some online prescription polarised varifocals from opti labs . Anyway the lenses arrived from the states and had a fault in the coating at the edges. Opti labs cut them down put them in a frame and sent them to me free. to avoid any further delays I wore them all day yesterday. They are a bit narrower than I would have liked but still very very good. After a week they rang to ask how I was getting on with them and suggested if I liked them I should keep them and they would supply me a pair in a different lense colour combo which I am now waiting for. Have to say although slow the service has been impressive will give full review later.....when the second pair arrive , Two pairs for the price of one what is not to like

O M W
 

JCP

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Really does depend on personal requirements.The best don't come cheap.Adequate does not cut it if you seriously want to see into the water and your success depends on it.The choice is ours to make.It seems a very long time ago when a Mexican Charter boat Captain gave me a looksee through his Costa Del Mar glasses.As Mr Trout said an amazing difference.Result is I have quite a collection of high end glasses now fit for purpose.Each unto their own but there is no budget solution.By the same token if you are happy with lesser quality which work well then that is fine too but trying to compare is just an illusion.
 

thetrouttickler

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I'm curious to know the difference now as I have never looked through a top end pair, but believe my £40 Guideline pair to be excellent.

Is anyone with top and low end options able to post a few comparison photos?
 

Overmiwadrers

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Agree with JCP.... I have Smiths Chromapops in Brown for rivers , Blue for Flats fishing ( I cant get on with green ) Everyone is different . I have some of the Smiths rose coloured low light jobs , They are all excellent . I have some nice Mau Jims too but they are more styled for been seen on a terrace with a G and T , A couple of years ago I bought some Korda ( carp angling brand ) Yellow / green ones of ebay for about £20 . I wore them loads , they are brilliant partly I suspect as the fit is so good. These days I think age is meaning I struggle more with dry eyes and so contact lenses are less of an option. probably If I get on really well with the new prescription jobs I will be sticking some of the smiths on fleabay

O M W
 

bonefishblues

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I think we should compare top brands' quality with cheaper glasses JCP - as TT's interested to do.

Fundamentally, at the heart of polarising sunglasses, the polarising film is identical on a 10 quid cheapie to that on a pair of £200+ Costas, so where are the differences, exactly?

Well, quality of materials used accounts for quite a lot. I've never broken a pair of top quality glasses frames, because they are built better, from better quality plastics (in the main), and that will also hold the lens more securely and in better alignment.

A top quality pair should (IMHO) have glass lenses. Why? Because they are not susceptible to the kind of micro-scratches (and bigger ones too!) that afflict polycarbs., even high quality polycarbs. used by the top brands (anti-scratch coatings are particularly important on plastic lenses). As soon as you have scratches, you have light being scattered, and visual acuity suffers. Importantly, glass lenses are able to be manufactured to very tight tolerances, so the lens holds the polarising film correctly and in perfect alignment, and there aren't light distortions such as those you can see on cheap, thin polycarb. or CR39 lenses. Borosilicate glass allows thinner and therefore lighter glass lenses to be produced, obviating one of the disadvantages of glass over plastics.

Top brands give you all manner of colours and coatings too, which can allow you to tailor their use to your own application. For instance, blue light is inherently 'fuzzy' and unfocused, so reducing it will always make things appear sharper. You can see this effect easily on some brands of hi-fi, like bits of my own kit. No matter how much I try to focus on a blue 'on' light on one piece, it will never seem sharp, unlike the red one on another. And so on, and so on...they all have their own proprietary colours, filters and coatings which are uniquely suited to a specific application, it is asserted.

But, I think it is worth repeating that if they don't fit your head properly, then even the expensive brands can't perform properly.

I used to hang a couple of pairs around my neck, and flip them according to conditions on the flats. I don't bother any more, because I've settled on a lens I'm convinced gives me the best acuity in all conditions, but as I said, what works for me won't necessarily work for you.

Just some ramblings around the subject :)

ETA
A bit more info around lens materials on a slow morning.
 
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uptomyknee_s

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A lot of river keepers on the chalk streams will tell you that your glasses are as important as your rod and you should be prepared to spend likewise. However, the price of Costas in Stockbridge High Street is greater than any rod I've ever owned!
Good glasses, for protection as well as visibility, are vital so get the best ones you can.

Reg Wyatt
Robjents by any chance?
 

skajtrout

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I think we should compare top brands' quality with cheaper glasses JCP - as TT's interested to do.

Fundamentally, at the heart of polarising sunglasses, the polarising film is identical on a 10 quid cheapie to that on a pair of £200+ Costas, so where are the differences, exactly?

Well, quality of materials used accounts for quite a lot. I've never broken a pair of top quality glasses frames, because they are built better, from better quality plastics (in the main), and that will also hold the lens more securely and in better alignment.

A top quality pair should (IMHO) have glass lenses. Why? Because they are not susceptible to the kind of micro-scratches (and bigger ones too!) that afflict polycarbs., even high quality polycarbs. used by the top brands. As soon as you have scratches, you have light being scattered, and visual acuity suffers. They also, importantly, glass lenses are able to be manufactured to very tight tolerances, so the lens holds the polarising film correctly and in perfect alignment, and there aren't light distortions such as those you can see on cheap, thin polycarb. lenses.

Top brands give you all manner of colours and coatings too, which can allow you to tailor their use to your own application. For instance, blue light is inherently 'fuzzy' and unfocused, so reducing it will always make things appear sharper. You can see this effect easily on some brands of hi-fi, like bits of my own kit. No matter how much I try to focus on a blue 'on' light on one piece, it will never seem sharp, unlike the red one on another. And so on, and so on...they all have their own proprietary colours, filters and coatings which are uniquely suited to a specific application, it is asserted.

But, I think it is worth repeating that if they don't fit your head properly, then even the expensive brands can't perform properly.

I used to hang a couple of pairs around my neck, and flip them according to conditions on the flats. I don't bother any more, because I've settled on a lens I'm convinced gives me the best acuity in all conditions, but as I said, what works for me won't necessarily work for you.

Just some ramblings around the subject :)

What lens did you settle on in the end?

Also, I must say it’s always particularly interesting when someone who really Knows Their. Sh1t. comments on a subject. Thanks for that, nice one.

Skaj
 
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bonefishblues

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What lens did you settle on in the end?

Also, I must say it’s always particularly interesting when someone who really Knows Their. Sh1t. comments on a subject. Thanks for that, nice one.

Skaj
I wear glass Hobie Sightmasters* - a yellowy ever-so-slightly greenish lens with a high light transmission. Every bit as good a lens in terms of anything that I can see in terms of the lens quality itself as my Costas - well better, because the tint is just perfect for me.
...but no longer available in glass, only polycarb - I do have more than enough pairs to see me out though :ROFLMAO:

That said, the very finest lens I've ever used was the original Corning Optics Strata on the Serengetis I bought in the late 80s. I sold them though - on here, actually. I'd buy them back in a heartbeat, just because :confused:

*What the late Lefty Kreh used to wear, I'm led to believe - I'm sure I tried them on his recommendation (in an article I read, not because we were chatting one night, I hasten to add). I gave a pair to a Guide in the Bahamas on a particularly awful murky sighting day. They instantly became his weekly tip and we caught a bunch of fish!
 

teify

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Thanks to everyone who replied to my thread. You’ve certainly given me food for thought. I’ll google to find if any of your recommendations are local to me so I can try a pair on for fit and feel.
Many thanks again.
Regards
John
 

JCP

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Thanks to everyone who replied to my thread. You’ve certainly given me food for thought. I’ll google to find if any of your recommendations are local to me so I can try a pair on for fit and feel.
Many thanks again.
Regards
John
Can be confusing John.Try to match lens to suit your predominant needs.One will not do all well although there were some decent allrounders out there.All of mine are glass lens.Have not needed to buy any for some years so not really up to speed on latest and greatest.
 
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