predator 9ft #9 4piece

doobrysnatcher

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this is my new set up for pike large 9weight reel , #9 floater line and a 9ft#9 4 piece
has anyone used these rods from maximumcatch ?
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roger h 10

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I ordered one of these but the order was cancelled by Maxcatch. I ended up buying an ordinary Maxcatch in #12 weight and it's brilliant.
 

doobrysnatcher

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I ordered one of these but the order was cancelled by Maxcatch. I ended up buying an ordinary Maxcatch in #12 weight and it's brilliant.
im new to this pike fishing and a 9ft #9 was recommended to me ,but me being me find it hard to part with money ,hence the introductory rod
 

jc123

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im new to this pike fishing and a 9ft #9 was recommended to me ,but me being me find it hard to part with money ,hence the introductory rod

should be fine , i used to use my 9'6 #8 GR60 but bought an extreme 9' #8 last year to use mainly for pike and its spot on, i'm not one for massive streamers, but it chucks out 3 & 4 " streamers no probs
 

running bear

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I've just had my first decent session/extended trial with the Maxcatch Saltpro 9'#9. Landed 7 to 13.5lb (largest in pic).

I was using the 40+ WF9's (over weight, true to 11's). The salt pro was fine with small to medium pike flies, but I thought a little over gunned with the larger 8" heavy tied patterns. I could solve this by going to a 40+ #8 (still lots of line weight for big flies), or I'd go for the #10 rod (better idea)

I used with an Orvis Mid V (as I do for all pike and salt - cracking reels). I don't like 4" reels for single handers, even light ones don't look right IMHO, but as pike don't need much backing, a larger 7/8 or 7-9 loaded with gel spun would be my preference over a 4" #9/10 reel.

All in all however, an excellent bit of kit for the cash.
 

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running bear

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im new to this pike fishing and a 9ft #9 was recommended to me ,but me being me find it hard to part with money ,hence the introductory rod
Doobry, as a newbie chicken chucker, if you want any info or patterns (given you can knock them out daily), feel free to ask. I started pike fly fishing in the 90s before it was the in thing, so have made ALL the mistakes possible, and a few i thought impossible!
 
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doobrysnatcher

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Doobry, as a newbie chicken chucker, if you want any info or patterns (given you can knock them out daily), feel free to ask. I started pike fly fishing in the 90s before it was te on thing, so have made ALL the mistakes possible, and a few i thought impossible!
thanks RB im going solo on my boat tomorrow with my one pattern ,lol im dreading catching one to be honest. if i manage to catch one how do i handle it correctly ?i looked at u tube and they seem to pot there hands into thegills i was planning on a net whats the best way without loosing a finger
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running bear

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I'd assumed you had caught pike before, just not on fly.
First thing on the fishing, that fly will do well, but has an element that will hold water, so be patient with it, the first false cast or two, it will be heavy. It could even float before it takes on some water. I'll send on some patterns later in the week to copy that will cast easier and fish even better.
A net would be good to start, but chinning is ultimately easier when you get the knack. So, you have one in the net, slip your fingers up through the gill opening, staying tight to the chin/bottom jaw. If right handed, do this with your left hand. Once you insert your fingers, do it confidently, dont pull back or you will injure yourself on gills or the hook, even if you feel the hook on your way in, keep going. Once fingers are in, lock the bottom jaw against the ball of your thumb and lift the head upwards. This step opens the mouth. The pike may kick and twist, but the jaw lock against the ball of your thumb will hold anything, be firrm.
Pop the hook out and get it back. Forceps are OK but long nosed pliers are better.

Onto the fishing, pike take close, they follow and when they think they might lose a meal they hit. So before lifting off, rise the fly and sweep it upwards (sideways and up) in the water, ready for a hit. When they hit, dont rely on the weight of the fish to hook itself, or dont let it take line like a salmon before tightening. If the fly is in its mouth, tighten into a firm strike. If you miss a fish, it will come back, cast on top of it or repeat the cast it took on. Watch the fly as you sweep it to the surface and when it disappears, firmly strike.
Pike tail walk and run, but nothing like a salmon, great fun but the biggest risk on a hooked pike is it burying itself in lillies etc. Keep it from the wèeds, and worst case, if it snags you and is still hooked, if pulling doesnt work, go slack and it will hopefully move to clear water.
Dont over strip the fly either, work it to make it alive (but dying), wobbled deadbait type retrieve, entice them, and when you see them follow, sweep it and they will hit.
 

doobrysnatcher

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thanks for taking the time out to post this ,for me its invaluable advise ,ive digested it in paragraphs and imagined the situation ,if i was to sumerize ,place your hand in close to the jaw bone ,strike as soon as it bites ie hookenters mouth close to the boat and make the fly lively pun intended
 

running bear

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thanks for taking the time out to post this ,for me its invaluable advise ,ive digested it in paragraphs and imagined the situation ,if i was to sumerize ,place your hand in close to the jaw bone ,strike as soon as it bites ie hookenters mouth close to the boat and make the fly lively pun intended
More a case of striking when you already think the fish hooked, it takes a proper smooth but form strike to get a big hook to set, the fish may appear hooked before then, but its gripping the fly in its mouth amd you will loose it after a few seconds. It will all make sense afyer a few takes.
Oh and fish to structure/drop offs and where bait fish are.
 

running bear

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Dooby, pic of a skinny deceiver style i have been having great success with, in both river and lake.
They are bullet proof (this one has had more than 15 pike to the net and is still in decent shape), they cast so easily and have exceptional movement. Casting them upstream on a river and twitching them back waiting for them to disappear is great fun. I use larger baitfish profile flies too, but find these more effective, and i tie these upto 9" if required.

This is a 5/0, total lengthjist over 5".
Some flash for the tail, but dont go heavy, this is Bogdans volume flash.
Then 2 collars of whte bucktail, one over the tail and the other midway, both given a dab of glue when tying in.
Then i add half a dozen hackles, i like the really long thin genetic capes, but chinese capes do fine.
The third and final bucktail collar is tied in forwards of the eye, and an empty biro used to push it back and form the head. I dont clip the waste as i think it adds to a nice profile.
Then i add the eyes, think these are 6mm, and UV resin the whole head.
Even on a floater, the heavy head, heavy fouro to wire leader, slow retrives can have this dancing at depths from the surface down to 8'.
Pics are poor, but you'll see lots of examples online better tied than this.
 

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