Recommend a camera

gerry_tweedie

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I am looking for a camera, probably from ebay of the likes that will allow me to take really good pics of my flies and fish. I am guessing I will probably be needing a macros lens as well. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. As I am only getting started a cheaper option would be preferable.
 

olive_dabbler

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I am looking for a camera, probably from ebay of the likes that will allow me to take really good pics of my flies and fish. I am guessing I will probably be needing a macros lens as well. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. As I am only getting started a cheaper option would be preferable.
If you think it will be a start, and you’ll upgrade later, then I’d look at second hand DSLRs with lowish shutter counts and 12MP or more. Nikon has an advantage over most other mainstream brands in that its lens mount means you can still use lenses made decades ago, many of which have superb optics. Where macro photography is concerned, autofocus etc. tends to get in the way, so older manual fucus lenses are perfectly usable. Something like a Nikon D300 sells on eBay for £100-£150 and is a superb DSLR. A second-hand Nikon macro starts at around £180, but you can get Sigma or Tamron ones for less. Both Nikon and Canon have vast second hand markets and, with some patience, it is possible to pick up some superb optics for either at quite reasonable prices, they will never be dirt cheap, good optics never are. Hope this helps.
 
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arkle

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I use Nikon gear, & if you want a really good macro lense, their 40mm 2.8 is the one to go for, it's designed to be used on the bodies with a smaller sensor - like the D90 but there again those bodies are a lot cheaper than the "full frame" types. It's wquiv. to a normal 60mm on full frame's b.t.w. & can easily be used as a fast-ish general purpose lense, so expect to pay around £140 or so for a good s/h one. The above body, can obviously be bought with a stndard zoom lense (18-105 is a cracker) & not over-priced. Sure it's older tech & not as fast as the latest gear, but for the money it's very hard to beat. If you can't stretch to both get the body with a zoon lens & a set of close up filters. A spare battery is always worth getting & make sure your body comes with a charger !

Doubtless the Canon a.o. guys will be along shortly...
 

olive_dabbler

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John’s post has reminded me to add that you can use older Nikon and other lenses designed for full frame on newer cropped sensor cameras with a 1.5x focal length equivalent increase. You can’t do the reverse with most full frame bodies, i.e. use a lens desgned for cropped sensors. However, there is a full upgrade path these days on cropped sensor cameras. I change camera bodies about every 5 years and lenses, well pretty much never. One plus you’ll find from using any good DSLR is that you will learn a lot more about creating images and have fun whike doing so.
 
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olive_dabbler

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What is a lowish shutter count?
Well, WEX Photo have a D300 with a count of 6,500 for sale - that seems pretty low to me for a camera of that vintage. It depends on the camera to some extent, mid-range DSLRs are usually rated for around 100k shutter actuations, my current D800 is rated to 200k.
 

codyarrow

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I have a sony a200, which I have had about 15 years. It's ok but it has a delay between pressing the button and photo capture (which is cak for wildlife). Would the a nikon D300 have instantaneous capture? (if that's the right phrase).

Sorry for borrowing your thread Gerry - it was just good, or bad timing, beacuse I wanted to know the same thing.;)
 
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olive_dabbler

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I have a sony a200, which I have had about 15 years. It's ok but it has a delay between pressing the button and photo capture (which is cak for wildlife). Would the a nikon D300 have instantaneous capture? (if that's the right phrase).

Sorry for borrowing your thread Gerry - it was just good, or bad timing, beacuse I wanted to know the same thing.;)
I've not used a D300 since 2012 and for the want of me can't remember if I noticed any lag, but I mainly do landscape photography. The documented pre-focussed shutter lag on a D300 is 45ms cf. A200 85ms. It depends greatly on whether you're prefocussed or using autofocus. Older DSLRs have slower autofocus, a D300 has a combined full single-point autofocus/shutter lag of 227ms cf. 189ms on an A200 so really depends on how you're using the camera.

You can see the respective performance specs here:

Sony DSLR-A200 Review - Performance

Nikon D300 Review - Performance
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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I am looking for a camera, probably from ebay of the likes that will allow me to take really good pics of my flies and fish. I am guessing I will probably be needing a macros lens as well. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. As I am only getting started a cheaper option would be preferable.
Bear in mind, if you are on a budget, you can do macro without splashing a lot of cash. See here..

Budget macro options for interchangeable lens camera owners

Col
 

george387

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if you are like me and get into the water more than your out I recommend you start with a point & shoot waterproof camera like the fujifilm xp range, very good, small & compact and good photos.

If you want something more advanced then look around on facebook marketplace or ebay. I picked up a good low shutter count Canon DSLR last year for sub £150, I've since upgraded again to a brand new Canon 77D but the buying of the 2nd hand one took me down a new avenue of photography away from the fishing which I now enjoy when the rivers are unfishable.
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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I am looking for a camera, probably from ebay of the likes that will allow me to take really good pics of my flies and fish. I am guessing I will probably be needing a macros lens as well. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. As I am only getting started a cheaper option would be preferable.
It would be useful to know the following:

1) Are you looking for a fixed lens camera or an interchangeable lens camera?
2) Cuanto dinero?
3) What size?

Number 3 may sound odd, but it's the most important to me. Everyone seems to be obsessed by small, small, small. I don't want teeny-weeny, I want it to fit my hand, so my fingers and thumb are on top of the buttons they need to be pressing while I am using it. I could recommend a camera to you that I think gives you an amazing amount of bang for your bucks, but it's what they call a full sized camera, and if you have never used one, it might seem like a monster of a thing.

Col
 

easker1

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I have a Panasonic Lumix, it has a 16X optical Zoom, and a range of functions,a decent size Screen, it's compact, and easy to use, probably one of the Decent fixed lens options, easker1
 

olive_dabbler

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I have a Panasonic Lumix, it has a 16X optical Zoom, and a range of functions,a decent size Screen, it's compact, and easy to use, probably one of the Decent fixed lens options, easker1
Good point, as a compact, cameras like the Lumix LX-100 are superb and also have macro capability and full manual (point and shoots work as well, but IMHO limit creativity quite severly). I don't always have the courage to take several Ks worth of DSLR kit with me every time I go fishing on the off chance of taking photos, so the LX-100, in a suitably robust case, is what sits in my tackle bag or vest every time and I use the serious stuff when I'm fishing in Scotland where the landscapes make it worth the risk!!! :)

Fly macro taken with an LX-100, not as sharp as a DLSR, but usable:

 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Good point, as a compact, cameras like the Lumix LX-100 are superb and also have macro capability and full manual...
For sure - just depends on budget. My compact (Canon PowerShot G10) is about 10 years old now, and consequently, you can pick them up on eBay for about £40...

Canon PowerShot G10 14.7MP Digital Camera - Black, used, good working order 13803100075 | eBay

Like yours, it has full manual controls (PASM, etc) and good macro. 14.7 MP sensor, manual focusing, RAW capture, etc. Here is a macro shot taken with it...


... and a landscape...


There will be dozens of similar makes, models and marques available.

It needs to be borne in mind that someone upgrading their hardware really needs to upgrade their software as well, if they are going to make the most of things like RAW capture. I had a friend bought himself a dSLR and then complained that he reckoned he got better photos from his iPhone. The problem was that he was shooting RAW files but wasn't doing any processing on them. :eek:mg: I got him to come to me and we spent a day together on Adobe Camera RAW and the scales fell from his eyes, big-time! If you shoot RAW, you need to put the hours in on a decent RAW editor to learn how to 'process' the shots.

If you just want to get usable JPEGs 'straight out of camera' then of course you can do that, but you need to read the manual, cover to cover. Get a handle on what to set all your parameters to, as you are trusting the camera to do all the RAW processing on your behalf, and it hasn't a clue what you want, until you tell it.

Col
 

Overmiwadrers

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Amazed no one has mentioned the Olympus Tough . I have the TG 4 and its stunning the New TG 5 is fantastic . I have been a lover of Pentax for 30 years these days I have a Pentax K50 with water resistant lens mounts but I still use the Tough 95% of the time . It has a tremendous lense is completely waterproof and even has a microscope mode for fly shots . A pal who has lots of magazine articles published uses one for shots that get published. DSLR cameras are great but if you do not know how to use one they are a waste of money.

O M W
 

sum olgy

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Olympus Tough - takes macro shots of #22 flies, landscapes and underwater shots of fish. With more bells and whistles than you'll ever use.
 

4wings

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When the website Wild About Britain.com was going strong, some of the best macro shots were with the top of the range Lumix Bridge Cameras.
 

sofasurfer

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In my opinion the secret is to always have your camera with you. Wildlife won't wait for you to return to the car for you camera. Light changes quickly. You won't want a hunk of metal and glass hanging around your neck. Use your phone.
 

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