River restoration, responsibilities and sewage

kerryjordan

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Aug 1, 2009
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88
Now that the manhole has been lifted on the amount and duration of raw sewage being dumped into our rivers, I’m wondering what the position is regarding fishing clubs undertaking in-river restoration work?
I don’t think it is reasonable to expect volunteers to expose themselves to potentially life changing pathogens such as coliform bacteria or hepatitis subtypes and my club has now stopped a 3 year project. I haven’t seen any advice from the Angling Trust / Fish Legal who admittedly have done a sterling job for us on Covid and fishing but I certainly would welcome their input.
 

jerryrum

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May 13, 2016
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Milton Keynes and Leighton Buzzard
I would think the key here is educating the volunteers so they understand the level of risk.

Whenever any 'in water' work is taking place there is always an element of risk, whether from the water itself (slip and drown) or the nasties in it. As long as people know what they are letting themselves in for it is up to them to decide.

The river I work on is rather urban, so I always have Weil's disease at the back of my mind and there are also steep banks, broken glass, hidden shopping trollies etc to contend with.

To try and mitigate this we always carry out a full H&S assessment, bankside, and carry the safety gear appropriate to the project.
 

kerryjordan

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Aug 1, 2009
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88
I absolutely agree with you and have followed the same principles; however, in 2019 there were 52 episodes of raw sewage being discharged into my club’s local stream for a duration in excess of 1200 hours by a treatment plant 2 miles upstream.
As a club I think we have a duty of care to our members and think this is just too risky. It also raises the secondary question of what is the point of spending time, effort and money on restoring a watercourse being routinely (and legally) poisoned.
 

aenoon

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Jun 12, 2009
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11,682
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Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
I absolutely agree with you and have followed the same principles; however, in 2019 there were 52 episodes of raw sewage being discharged into my club’s local stream for a duration in excess of 1200 hours by a treatment plant 2 miles upstream.
As a club I think we have a duty of care to our members and think this is just too risky. It also raises the secondary question of what is the point of spending time, effort and money on restoring a watercourse being routinely (and legally) poisoned.
Using same logic, then surely you would not be fishing said stream?
Risk assesment for fishing the area will be exactly the same for maintenance of said area.
regards
Bert
 

kerryjordan

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Joined
Aug 1, 2009
Messages
88
Using same logic, then surely you would not be fishing said stream?
Risk assesment for fishing the area will be exactly the same for maintenance of said area.
regards
Bert
You’re absolutely right!
 

mrnotherone

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Joined
Jul 19, 2013
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3,696
Location
Monmouthshire
As a club I think we have a duty of care to our members and think this is just too risky. It also raises the secondary question of what is the point of spending time, effort and money on restoring a watercourse being routinely (and legally) poisoned.
I'm not convinced it is legal. The Directive allows discharge in exceptional circumstances and it will be interesting to see if the current practice stands up in a court of law. Unfortunately our regulators appear complicit.
 

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