River Taff, Cardiff

icejohn

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
bristol
U will need to buy pair of neoprene waders if u intend to fish the winter plus a thermal suit thing from airflow.
 

j j

Well-known member
Points
0
U will need to buy pair of neoprene waders if u intend to fish the winter plus a thermal suit thing from airflow.
Any wader will do it is the underlayers and socks that count not just the wader material itself. Jeans and sports socks will leave you freezing in minutes. Boots upward is the way to go as these are the submerged bits of your body. I made the very same mistakes this year, my 1st year wading. I was freezing my feet off, my legs were going numb and I was faltering in the water. Neoprene kyak booties, merino wool under socks with wool socks over those, merino wool base layer, neoprene legs and jogging bottoms kept everything under the water toasty warm. it's a pain to put on and take off but by Christ it keeps those submerged bits from freezing.

JJ
 

icejohn

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
bristol
Just a thought on the taff,

Having fished it a fair few miles. Does anyone know if the taff is essentially a manmade river? By that once it enters the cardiff area there are quite a few weirs and man made banks. The rocky river bed bottom seems more or less evenly flat is this by design?

the upper reaches of the taff appear more natural with deep pools etc like i would expect on a normal river and more defined curved terracing on river coners etc.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
Yup, it's a heavily modified river from top to bottom.

Most European rivers are modified in their lower reaches but due to the mineral wealth surrounding the Taff's upper reaches and the industry which that gave rise to plus the house building which supported it the Taff has been chopped around to suit the needs of humanity for years.

Tributaries like the Rhondda and Dare were totally re-routed to suit the demands of day as was the Taff itself. In my lifetime the Taff has changed enormously, deepened straightened and plugged at its confluence with the sea, each action ruining the fishing but eventually the river re-establishes itself and its inhabitants endure, albeit impoverished by the altered habitats.

Part of the river's flood management requires large quantities of gravel being removed from its lower reaches which subsequently accommodate larger volumes of flood water in the man-made channel giving rise to uniform, flat stretches of river bed devoid of invertebrates. These ruined areas do re-naturalise but at a cost.

The trout fishing at Treforest, for example, was superb once, it had an exceptional head of large trout but following the removal of the gravel shoals a few years ago it was wrecked, a typical Taff scenario, one waits for the next impact on this punch drunk waterway which, at worst, is treated as nothing more than a convenient drain.

Despite the best efforts of the authorities the trout, somehow, manage to thrive but imagine how good it could be if it was to receive a decent amount of funds to mitigate the onslaught of our modern world, it could be magnificent.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
The Rhondda at Clwynypia, 1947, coal waste from Glamorgan Colliery sweeping up from the valley floor -



 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
This image sort of puts the brutality of the empty channel constructed for re routing the Dare into context, the River Dare emerging from a culvert under coal tips prior to diversion.

This is a classic image, wholly representative of many of the upper reaches of tributaries to the Taff, Ogmore, Tawe, Afan - you name them in fact, it was the same all over south Wales and still is in parts although the coal waste is grassed over nowadays.

Rather than me posting these images ad nauseam there are a stack of interesting photos in the Rhondda Cynon Taf Libraries Digital Archives



 

icejohn

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
bristol
Thanks for the replies guys fills in a few blanks. The plus I suppose fishing wading wise is the depth of the river is fairly uniform all over and not 20ft deep gives some confidence when wading.
 

JeffR

Well-known member
Points
0
Location
Staffs
After anything that sodding eats a fly. Like that taff but hard to read and the likely spots don't hold fish. Fishing the lower section. But some thing beautiful about the river that keeps dragging me back. Even if it's to catch the latest shopping trolley!
I've only fished it the once so far as reported some pages back - and I was trotting/centrepin for winter grayling - but it was certainly full of fish -although saying that I had to loosefeed quite heavily (compared to what I'm used to for grayling on the Dove) to get them going. I'm sure it would have been a lot harder on bugging gear (and harder work) but given the numbers present in most likely looking glides I'm sure it must generally produce pretty well. That was the stretch below Radyr Weir on a day ticket from Garry Evans. Quite easy wading it seemed too. I haven't managed to get down again over summer with the fly gear, but will certainly have another crack at the grayling trotting this winter when I can.
 

nash

Well-known member
Points
0
Anyone seen the video of the hydro scheme in Durham smashing the Salmon, it's very similar to the one at Radyr Weir but only one turbine not two like ours !
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
Yes, it's pretty awful and yet another impediment to fish migration on the Taff, that weir should have been removed. Presumably Llandaff will get the same treatment and grim though that prospect is it's nothing compared to the impact the proposed tidal lagoon would have on the Rhymney.

The proposal is to completely encapsulate the estuary and encroach on the Usk's estuary too as well as the already spoiled approaches to the Taff, total environmental vandalism on a vast scale.


 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
Follows years of radioactive discharges into the Taff and Severn estuary by Amersham International - links to an EA report on levels of radioactive discharge into Whitchurch Brook the Taff and the Severn.

Interesting to read - " Environment Secretary Lesley Griffiths said she was unable to comment on a process that had been carried out "some time ago"

Why dat? It's her job...

...also, conveniently -

"A marine licence allowing the company to dispose of the dredged mud in Welsh waters was granted during a period when responsibility for environmental regulation was being transferred from the former Environment Agency Wales to its successor body, Natural Resources Wales (NRW).
It means the application was handled by Welsh Government officials and BBC Wales understands they retain control over enforcing the terms of the licence."


It was a great time to bury bad mud.
 

fishy321

New member
Points
0
You can fish the left bank up to the M4, the right bank's a hassle above Radyr weir. The water down from the weir is all fairly good, frequently fished illegally, if you see anything odd phone NRW. The dead water above the weir is barbel territory, interesting to see if the work on the weir changes that, I doubt if it will though, should have blown the bloody thing up.

Congrats on the trout TP, a two pounder's a good fish in anyone's book, flashy wets can be very effective, I particularly like both of those, try a 3-4 mm tungsten bead hare's ear on the point to slow the swing a little, works well, the river should be perfect for that approach in a couple of days.
Interesting that you have said that the "dead water" above Radyr Weir is barbel territory. Can you throw anymore light on this?
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
Quite good barbel wise particularly if you pre-bait I'm told but the chub population isn't what it was, recruitment has been hammered by the cormorants over the last ten years but despite that there are still a few big chub around.

The Glamorgan Anglers water below Radyr weir and Blackweir have the favoured barbel swims and some real beauties in double figures come out each year, not as good as the Wye or Severn perhaps but still one of Wales' best mixed fisheries. I believe Glam Ang are stocking some silver fish so perhaps the chub as well as the dace and roach will come back although I have my doubts as both the club and NRW aren't keen on built-in fish refuges. GAC don't like the effect they would have on float fishing and NRW are incredibly reluctant to engage on any discussion with regard to in-stream installations due to the flood risk they pose and as no one's shooting the cormorants I'd imagine they're very grateful for any extra fish that come their way.

Good luck with the barbel, you'll get plenty of advice from the boys at Gary Evans and the anglers you meet on the river. Haven't caught any barbel on the fly myself but I know a few people who have (accidentally). Chub on the fly in the fast deep runs on the right bank below Radyr weir are still a reasonably good bet, a gold bead hares ear with a 4 mm tungsten bead gets you down deep enough and quickly enough to stand a chance of tempting one in the autumn.
 

fishy321

New member
Points
0
Quite good barbel wise particularly if you pre-bait I'm told but the chub population isn't what it was, recruitment has been hammered by the cormorants over the last ten years but despite that there are still a few big chub around.

The Glamorgan Anglers water below Radyr weir and Blackweir have the favoured barbel swims and some real beauties in double figures come out each year, not as good as the Wye or Severn perhaps but still one of Wales' best mixed fisheries. I believe Glam Ang are stocking some silver fish so perhaps the chub as well as the dace and roach will come back although I have my doubts as both the club and NRW aren't keen on built-in fish refuges. GAC don't like the effect they would have on float fishing and NRW are incredibly reluctant to engage on any discussion with regard to in-stream installations due to the flood risk they pose and as no one's shooting the cormorants I'd imagine they're very grateful for any extra fish that come their way.

Good luck with the barbel, you'll get plenty of advice from the boys at Gary Evans and the anglers you meet on the river. Haven't caught any barbel on the fly myself but I know a few people who have (accidentally). Chub on the fly in the fast deep runs on the right bank below Radyr weir are still a reasonably good bet, a gold bead hares ear with a 4 mm tungsten bead gets you down deep enough and quickly enough to stand a chance of tempting one in the autumn.
Many thanks for all the useful information about the Taff. I'll let you know how I get on!
 

nash

Well-known member
Points
0
For the first time in many a year I did not fish the last day of the Salmon season yesterday as such is the poor stocks of migratory fish in the Taff
 
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