Rod for general lough style fishing Ireland.

splinters

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( Legend has it that.....) Competition Loch style with it's modern rules about fly size etc. was "invented" by English fishers having a competition on a Scottish loch, hence Loch Style. Fips wosname et al adopted that name. In fact the style is nothing more than an adaption of the Great Exhibition Style which dates back to the reign of the old Queen, Christopher Biggins. Victoria.

Now, as to the question, I have a Snowbee Prestige 10'#5 which is nice for dries at mayfly time and a Bloke 10'#5 which is great for pulling wets on sunk lines when teamed with a #6 line.
I've also ordered a CTS 10'#5 blank to build for next year.

Simon.
 

Gdog

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Get yourself an old 10 foot Daiwa Whisker Fly, or perhaps the 11'3 version. Through action, soft and perfect for loch style. You will lose fewer fish too. You should get one on Ebay for 30 quid.
I can't vouch for that, I had Daiwa CF98 11'3 #5/7 and WF 98 10' # 6/8 rods and lost about 1 in 3 - 4 trout I hooked with them, and that was over a 10 year period. I wouldn't go back to using them now.

I've owned a few modern 10' # 6 rods and lost far fewer fish with all of them, and they cast miles better and are better at handling lines of different densities than the Daiwas.

I bought a Snowbee Prestige GXS 10' #6 last year, its a brilliant rod with anything from a floater to a type 5 sinker, nymphs; dries and wets, light in the hand, enough power on a windy day. A superb all round lough rod, definitely worth consideration.
 
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clag

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'Loch Style' or 'Lough Style' hhhmmm. Every book I have on fishing afloat for trout on Stillwaters be they Loch's or Loughs from the 1920s-1970s refers to it as Wet Fly Fishing from a boat without exception. The fishing equivalent of Gangnam Style is another pointless modern affectation like 'Fast Actioned'.

O/T when I was a teenager the Brucey Walker Century 11' 3" was the wand of choice on Salmon and Sea Trout Lochs of the North and resevoirs of the South. Then Bob Church launched some terrible poles only to be outrubbished by the 12' Laser Boron for which the buying of one I lay firmly at the door of Stanletta :ROFLMAO:

The Shakey 11' Worcestershire Boron was good but had the disadvantage of being two peice. However, if the OP can find one, the best specialist wet fly rod for a boat I have ever cast was the Sage XP 11' #6 4 piece (and in a rare tackle regret I passed on the opportunity to buy one when I had the chance). To quote Gerry Cinamon 'She's a Belter'.

I think it never quite gained the reputation it deserved because it wasn't designed for Blob chuckers to bash stockies through a wide range of depths in the name of 'competition'. Like most of the best of the XP range you hardly ever see them on eBay and yet they are still being fished with regularly nearly 20 years after they stopped making the originals.....go figure.

Regards

CLaG
 
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ACW

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'Loch Style' or 'Lough Style' hhhmmm. Every book I have on fishing afloat for trout on Stillwaters be they Loch's or Loughs from the 1920s-1970s refers to it as Wet Fly Fishing from a boat without exception. The fishing equivalent of Gangnam Style is another pointless modern affectation like 'Fast Actioned'.

O/T when I was a teenager the Brucey Walker Century 11' 3" was the wand of choice on Salmon and Sea Trout Lochs of the North and resevoirs of the South. Then Bob Church launched some terrible poles only to be outrubbished by the 12' Laser Boron for which the buying of one I lay firmly at the door of Stanletta :ROFLMAO:

The Shakey 11' Worcestershire Boron was good but had the disadvantage of being two peiced. However, if the OP can find one, the best specialist wet fly rod for a boat I have ever cast was the Sage XP 11' #6 4 piece (and in a rare tackle regret I passed on the opportunity to buy one when I had the chance). To quote Gerry Cinamon 'She's a Belter'.

I think it never quite gained the reputation it deserved because it wasn't designed for Blob chuckers to bash stockies through a wide range of depths in the name of 'competition'. Like most of the best of the XP range you hardly ever see them on eBay and yet they are still being fished with regularly nearly 20 years after they stopped making the originals.....go figure.

Regards

CLaG
I still own several B&W 11.3 and fish the lighter line one from time to time
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Get yourself an old 10 foot Daiwa Whisker Fly, or perhaps the 11'3 version. Through action, soft and perfect for loch style. You will lose fewer fish too. You should get one on Ebay for 30 quid.

I fished for many years with a Daiwa 11'3" #5/7 and caught plenty of fish on it. I wouldn't ever go back to one now, just too soft/slow for anything but more or less straight down the wind. There are times when you want to cut across the wind a bit (or even go completely square), or you might suddenly find yourself becalmed and want to fish dry (if like me you don't like having the boat cluttered up with spare rods).

The best light loch rod I ever had was an 11' #5 carbotec (sadly broken). My weapon of choice now is an Enigma 11' #6. I do occasionally take the old Daiwa out of the bag and give it a wiggle and think nah I'm not using that again!

An observation. At least 90% of the people I saw fishing "loch style" when ghillying could get away with an 8 foot rod because they make no meaningful effort to dibble so there is no point them stressing their wrists with an 11 foot rod!


Andy
 

patk

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I used to use 10 foot 7 wts Sage Xp and Zaxis and more than those a Redington CPS. Now i use either a 10 foot 6 wt Z Axis or more usually a Vision GT4 3 piece in same config. In lakes here in Ireland for me the last retrieve on the "dibble" is so productive that 10 foot is for me essential did try longer but did find that tiresome for a day but effective.
 

Gdog

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I fished for many years with a Daiwa 11'3" #5/7 and caught plenty of fish on it. I wouldn't ever go back to one now, just too soft/slow for anything but more or less straight down the wind. There are times when you want to cut across the wind a bit (or even go completely square), or you might suddenly find yourself becalmed and want to fish dry (if like me you don't like having the boat cluttered up with spare rods).

The best light loch rod I ever had was an 11' #5 carbotec (sadly broken). My weapon of choice now is an Enigma 11' #6. I do occasionally take the old Daiwa out of the bag and give it a wiggle and think nah I'm not using that again!

An observation. At least 90% of the people I saw fishing "loch style" when ghillying could get away with an 8 foot rod because they make no meaningful effort to dibble so there is no point them stressing their wrists with an 11 foot rod!


Andy
I thoroughly agree with your assessment of the 11' 3" Daiwa rod.

I was on my way back from being on the USA when mine was stolen from my car with an equally soft Daiwa Profly. All I could afford to replace the CF98 with was a 10' WF98, which I used for 6 years. I remember one weekend fishing 2 days in a row, using a St.Croix I bought in the States and the Daiwa and losing 8 out of 12 fish I hooked, all came off within seconds of hooking them. 😤 This has never happened with any rod I've owned in the last 20 years.

So I can't say too many positives about the Daiwa rods from the 80's or 90's and really don't understand how people praise them, looking back through rose tinted glasses maybe?

I traded in the Daiwa for a 10' #6/7 Greys Greyflex when they first came on the market. A massively better rod than any of the Daiwa's I owned, and an excellent all round lough style rod, sold because of problems fitting a 2 piece rod in the boot with all the other stuff when away with the young family.
 

codyarrow

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I owned an 11 ft 3" 5-7wt Daiwa for all of 2 outings. Bought it for £30, decided it was liquorice and sold it for £30. It caught fish though, and lost no more than any other rod. The guy that bought it was a club member who had been using one for 20 years until it broke and was amazed and delighted to get a replacement.
Not sure I agree with Daiwa being rubbish though. On the whole they were a pretty consistent brand at a reasonable price. Still have a whisker fly and some of the Altmore's were really nice pieces of kit.
As to the ideal rod nowadays I think this has a lot to do with what age you are and how much is left in the tank.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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'Loch Style' or 'Lough Style' hhhmmm. Every book I have on fishing afloat for trout on Stillwaters be they Loch's or Loughs from the 1920s-1970s refers to it as Wet Fly Fishing from a boat without exception. T

I doubt I and my companions of the 1960s and 70s bothered to call it something as complicated as 'Wet Fly Fishing from a boat'. We would simply have called it fly fishing. Blame the English competition anglers for coining the term 'loch-style'. They needed to draw distinction between the methods used in the competitions fished (with rules) from drifting boats, rather than anything practiced at anchor, or with a rudder or lee board. As they were coming into a method that we had been practicing for many years (and just calling it fly fishing), they coined the term 'loch-style'. :) If you Google it, most of the hits will be English-based. 😉
 

Gdog

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I doubt I and my companions of the 1960s and 70s bothered to call it something as complicated as 'Wet Fly Fishing from a boat'. We would simply have called it fly fishing. Blame the English competition anglers for coining the term 'loch-style'. They needed to draw distinction between the methods used in the competitions fished (with rules) from drifting boats, rather than anything practiced at anchor, or with a rudder or lee board. As they were coming into a method that we had been practicing for many years (and just calling it fly fishing), they coined the term 'loch-style'. :) If you Google it, most of the hits will be English-based. 😉
I think you'd be right, we just call it fly fishing in Ireland. They over complicated it in England for sure and there were drogues and booby's and blobs too. 🤭
 

clag

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I doubt I and my companions of the 1960s and 70s bothered to call it something as complicated as 'Wet Fly Fishing from a boat'. We would simply have called it fly fishing. Blame the English competition anglers for coining the term 'loch-style'. They needed to draw distinction between the methods used in the competitions fished (with rules) from drifting boats, rather than anything practiced at anchor, or with a rudder or lee board. As they were coming into a method that we had been practicing for many years (and just calling it fly fishing), they coined the term 'loch-style'. :) If you Google it, most of the hits will be English-based. 😉
Capn

For heaven's sake 'Wot'


RTFM or should I say RTFB they say 'Wet Fly Fishing'

Now once again Capn don't say Wot - say I've now actually read the FB and they all say fishing 3 -4 flies on a short cast in front of the boat with a lift is called Wet Fly Fishing

Jeez 🤖

Regards

CLaG
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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'Loch Style' or 'Lough Style' hhhmmm. Every book I have on fishing afloat for trout on Stillwaters be they Loch's or Loughs from the 1920s-1970s refers to it as Wet Fly Fishing from a boat without exception.

As I said, we called it 'fly fishing'.
 

Rhithrogena

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I can't vouch for that, I had Daiwa CF98 11'3 #5/7 and WF 98 10' # 6/8 rods and lost about 1 in 3 - 4 trout I hooked with them, and that was over a 10 year period. I wouldn't go back to using them now
I have a 'thing' for old Daiwas (from when I worked for the Daiwa game angling rep) and have fished with loads of them. Used to do my comp fishing (brief as it was) with a CF98 10'6" 5/8 T
So I can't say too many positives about the Daiwa rods from the 80's or 90's
I have a C96 9'6" #7 that will still put the whole of a DT5 out to the backing. A bit slower and thicker than many modern rods, but tough as old boots and great to play fish on. I have fished with a lot of Daiwa rods s/h and d/h, and have never had a run of lost fish on any of them.
I can see how it might put you off, though 🤔
 

clag

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As I said, we called it 'fly fishing'.
I'm not talking about a mysterious and irrelevant Klingon Convention of Capn friends locally known as the 'We' I'm referring to almost all the published relevant litterature over the last century - Capn - Jeez twice in an evening - regards - CLaG
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I'm not talking about a mysterious and irrelevant Klingon Convention of Capn friends locally known as the 'We'

Neither am I. I'm talking about the guys I have fished with since I was young.

I'm referring to almost all the published relevant litterature over the last century

They all call it 'wet fly fishing from a boat'. So what if I say we just called that 'fly fishing'? What's wrong with that? :unsure:

Jeez twice in an evening - regards - CLaG

And wind yer neck in! If you want to argue with any points I made in Post #30, then go ahead, but cut out the personal remarks right now!
 

clag

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I am going to apologise to the OP at this point.
How very virtuous - we should all signal your lead and do so immediately - like they do in North Korea (I hope you have your notebook to hand to take down everything the Dear Leader says or be shot afterwards for not doing so) - btw - what exactly are you randomly apologising to the OP for? genuinely curious?

Regards

CLaG
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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How very virtuous - we should all signal your lead and do so immediately - like they do in North Korea (I hope you have your notebook to hand to take down everything the Dear Leader says or be shot afterwards for not doing so) - btw - what exactly are you randomly apologising to the OP for? genuinely curious?

Regards

CLaG

For having hijacked his thread. Obviously!
 

Ephemera

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Going back to the original question.............
the answer is not that simple. The conditions being, wind speed, temperature, sunlight levels on each day might dictate your choice of rod and line weight. Everybody takes a spare rod or six with them? There may not be a best rod for any day, just one that you fished well with and had some sport and a bit of luck. How many times have you dusted off an old favorite stick and had a great day?
It matters not, split cane, solid glass, fiberglass, boron, composite carbon, whatever,

Catching a wild fish, and admiring the beauty is a thing long learned, that's more important.
Your grandad , dad or brother shared the same passion and you were just lucky they passed it to you.
 

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