Rod length on stillwaters.

original cormorant

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I happily fish the 8'6" 4wt on BIG stillwaters with three flies and leaders up to 12'. If I am casting into the wind I drop to a 9' leader and two flies.
The vast majority of my trout are caught within a few rod lengths of the bank.
I use the 8'6" 6wt for pulling wets or lures at longer range.
12 feet is a pretty short leader for 3 flies.
 

ohanzee

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I happily fish the 8'6" 4wt on BIG stillwaters with three flies and leaders up to 12'. If I am casting into the wind I drop to a 9' leader and two flies.
The vast majority of my trout are caught within a few rod lengths of the bank.
I use the 8'6" 6wt for pulling wets or lures at longer range.

I tend to fish a 16' leader and catch most about 60' or more out, just the nature of bank fishing shallow lochs, you have to get out a bit to get deep water, always felt slightly under gunned with a 4 weight but it's probably more imagination and knowing you have a heavier option.
 

hooferinsane

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Thanks for all the comments. One reason I am looking at a lighter/shorter set up is that I have tendonitis in both shoulders at present, more the right (casting) shoulder. Probably repetitive strain from when I was working, have spent a fortune on chiropractic care, with about 50% improvement. Just ordered a maxcatch shorter, lighter 8.5/wf4 rod to see if this helps a little. At least if there is no difference I haven’t wasted mega bucks on a new rod. (Also as it’s on ‘medical’ grounds, the wife wasn’t opposed to another new rod :) )
 

tenet

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Thanks for all the comments. One reason I am looking at a lighter/shorter set up is that I have tendonitis in both shoulders at present, more the right (casting) shoulder. Probably repetitive strain from when I was working, have spent a fortune on chiropractic care, with about 50% improvement. Just ordered a maxcatch shorter, lighter 8.5/wf4 rod to see if this helps a little. At least if there is no difference I haven’t wasted mega bucks on a new rod. (Also as it’s on ‘medical’ grounds, the wife wasn’t opposed to another new rod :) )
I would have thought a light trout rated switch rod would help - being double handed there would not be too much of a need to wave your arms about casting.
I sometimes use a Daiwa 11.3" LochmoreZ with an extension handle and can roll cast or overhead cast easy peasy without and strain on shoulder or wrist.
 

sewinbasher

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For bank fishing rod length is relatively unimportant as long as fish can be netted without the top dropper jamming in the top ring. Line weight is guided by the size and weight of the flies to be used and sometimes weather conditions, strong winds promoting a heavier line. For my own small stillwater fishing I've virtually abandoned my 7wts and now mostly use 5wt and 6wt lines on rods of 8' 6" to 10'. For rivers I default to 4wt but have 5wt for larger flies. The one situation where I consider rod length important is for short lining or loch style where shorter rods just don't give sufficient control over the top dropper, I find the 11' 3" Sage RPL hard to beat and would never use anything shorter than 10'.
 

Rhithrogena

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I tend to fish a 16' leader and catch most about 60' or more out, just the nature of bank fishing shallow lochs, you have to get out a bit to get deep water, always felt slightly under gunned with a 4 weight but it's probably more imagination and knowing you have a heavier option.
60' comfortably achievable on the 4wt in suitable conditions, but I always have the 6wt as backup for extra windy days 😉
 

ohanzee

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Thanks for all the comments. One reason I am looking at a lighter/shorter set up is that I have tendonitis in both shoulders at present, more the right (casting) shoulder. Probably repetitive strain from when I was working, have spent a fortune on chiropractic care, with about 50% improvement. Just ordered a maxcatch shorter, lighter 8.5/wf4 rod to see if this helps a little. At least if there is no difference I haven’t wasted mega bucks on a new rod. (Also as it’s on ‘medical’ grounds, the wife wasn’t opposed to another new rod :) )

A longer lever puts more stress on the pivot, depending on how stiff it is also, but I find anything over 9' an annoyance now, just muscles being used to a given amount of leverage, if I use a heaver rod or longer I feel the difference pretty much immediately.

Also if you are getting strain in an isolated muscle it could indicate over using that one, you can cast with more focus on the forearm, just don't raise your elbow too far, I have seen people casting with their arm above their head, this is going to hurt eventually.
 

codyarrow

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To quote Bonny Tyler 'where have all the real men gone?'. Not too far back we all cast 10.5 ft 7 -9 weight rods made from heavy carbon using an 8wt line as the norm. 🤣
 

arawa

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To quote Bonny Tyler 'where have all the real men gone?'. Not too far back we all cast 10.5 ft 7 -9 weight rods made from heavy carbon using an 8wt line as the norm. 🤣
We have got older 🙁
I still have my second fly rod which is well over 50 years old. Fibreglass and metal ferrules but a massive improvement over my first rod; a seriously heavy greenheart monster.
Last year I tried the rod on grass and was surprised at how well it cast. But after a dozen casts my arm said enough! Bonnie will have to look elsewhere….
 

ohanzee

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To quote Bonny Tyler 'where have all the real men gone?'. Not too far back we all cast 10.5 ft 7 -9 weight rods made from heavy carbon using an 8wt line as the norm. 🤣

Glasgow angling center used to have a pallet of cheapo 8 weight rods and a pallet of bright orange Airflow lines to match, you got to choose the reel...'NEXT!'
 

sewinbasher

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To quote Bonny Tyler 'where have all the real men gone?'. Not too far back we all cast 10.5 ft 7 -9 weight rods made from heavy carbon using an 8wt line as the norm. 🤣
Even further back when we really were men and just before the availability of ground breaking glass rods like the B&W Ultralite I fished Chew Valley putting out a 9wt shooting head with an Edgar Sealey 10' Black Arrow glass sea trout rod that weighed a ton and often by early afternoon my forearm ached to the point of cramps.
 

ohanzee

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But it all changed when we imported proper fly fishing from America, proper trout rods, Lee Wulff landing salmon on 7' rods and the like :whistle:
 

ACW

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I am rather glad that the tip section of my Ivens Ravensthorpe is snafu,now that was a mans rod ,then I was cooking with copper pans and unloading two sacks of flower at a time !
10 ft of split cane was a step down from the 10ft fibatube #9/10 as recomended by bob church et al
 
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