Rod price variations

sean freeman

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I like using nice gear but not sure anyones political leaning is relevant Luke? I don’t think I’ll ever vote conservative either, especially considering the literal :poop: they tried to get away with this week. I think some of the points you make are quite true but you convey them in a way that annoys everyone.

Admittedly I’m not the biggest fan of maxcatch due to them undercutting our own tackle trade but I had a cast with a line of theirs a few months ago and begrudgingly I have to say it was excellent for the money.
I also don’t mind being labelled a poser for fishing with nice gear, I’m confident in the gear I fish and that confidence helps when faced with a big urban brownie cruising a pool. At the moment I just can’t wait to see my stickman's bent double on big Clyde sippers next spring, I’m daydreaming about it at work most days! Cabin fever is getting me at the moment.. what I wouldn’t give to take a trip to NZ or Argentina/Chile now!
 

nymphist

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Nope, their £3.50 lines are at least as good as anything I've bought from any other brand.
i moved to natural silk fly lines, initially for my cane rods, but recently i started to like the natural silk fly lines on my carbon rods too, in fact i prefer them to plastic lines for most of my fishing esp. dry fly.
 

LukeNZ

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Nope, their £3.50 lines are at least as good as anything I've bought from any other brand.
.....but we all learned long ago, that you know nothing John Snow!

Cheap and completely shameless knock off's of first world line developments. Where does the money go - who gets it, what does it support, and contribute to anything? A sensible question.

🙃
 

LukeNZ

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I like using nice gear but not sure anyones political leaning is relevant Luke? I don’t think I’ll ever vote conservative either, especially considering the literal :poop: they tried to get away with this week. I think some of the points you make are quite true but you convey them in a way that annoys everyone.

Admittedly I’m not the biggest fan of maxcatch due to them undercutting our own tackle trade but I had a cast with a line of theirs a few months ago and begrudgingly I have to say it was excellent for the money.
I also don’t mind being labelled a poser for fishing with nice gear, I’m confident in the gear I fish and that confidence helps when faced with a big urban brownie cruising a pool. At the moment I just can’t wait to see my stickman's bent double on big Clyde sippers next spring, I’m daydreaming about it at work most days! Cabin fever is getting me at the moment.. what I wouldn’t give to take a trip to NZ or Argentina/Chile now!
Fair enough! And I hope it is not long before you can make another trip to one of those global trout mecca's 👍

🙃
 

Vintage Badger

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....as an adide I do own something by Swarovski if that counts me in as being a high fashion icon 😃

I have some Swarovski binoculars, they have been with me over 20 years. Another good purchase choice - they have had a life and are still abdolutely brilliant. Probably my single most treasured possession.

🙃
I'm glad you posted that, as we can use this example to illustrate the point I (and others) have been making all along in this thread.

Around 12 years or so ago I wanted some new binoculars and was toying with buying a pair of Swarovski 8.5 x 42 EL (the full-fat version). I was discussing this with a colleague who asked how much they cost. After saying that it was around £1200 (the price at the time) my colleague said "Surely there's a happy medium and you don't have to spend that much?".

That 'voice of reason' made me do a bit more research. Enter a market disrupter... the Hawke Frontier ED 10x43 and 8x43, which had only just been launched at the time. After reading a few very favourable reviews (the findings of which seemed to have surprised the reviewer!) I decided to try a pair of 10 x 43s.

Shortly after buying them and getting that 'wow factor' looking through them, I met up with a very keen (and professional) birder colleague of mine. He had his 8.5 x 42 Swaro ELs with him (which he'd had for around 5 years or so by then - so probably a similar age to your binoculars now) and we were keen to compare our respective binoculars, so we swapped and did a quick comparison... and he went very quiet indeed.

I've been blessed with good eyesight (and still don't need to wear glasses) and I could immediately see that there appeared to be very little obvious difference indeed. Yes, the Swaro ELs were just a tiny bit sharper when looking across the whole field of view, but there really wasn't that big a difference. After we'd swapped back I asked my colleague why he hadn't suggested the Hawke Frontier ED as an option when I'd asked for his suggestions... to which he replied "That was before we realised just how bloody good they were!".

A subsequent test at 'dusk and beyond' showed my 10x43 Frontier EDs were just slightly behind in low light conditions.

The price difference? I paid £270 for my Hawke Frontier EDs, you'd have to add around £1000 to that to buy the 8.5x42 Swaro ELs at the time. I've since also bought a pair of 8x43 Frontier EDs (a slightly updated and improved model), the price? £140 as a clearance offer after a new model had been introduced! So I have two pairs of very usable binoculars of high optical quality for £410. Both pairs still work fine and are used fairly regularly by me for work purposes.

Don't get me wrong, if I used binoculars on a daily basis and they were my main tool for work, then I'd stump up the (at todays price) £1800 or so for a brand new pair of Swarovski EL 8.5x42 ELs. Why? Because I could justify the quite significant additional cost based on build quality, expected lifespan and additional image quality. But if they did break or get damaged and I had to send them in for repair I know I could get by quite comfortably with one or both of my sub-£300 Hawke Frontier EDs.

My point? Technology moves on, and these days paying a lot more money for something may well only bring a relatively small and incremental increase in build-quality, reliability and performance (if that!). Do your research, then choose wisely/drop lucky (delete as applicable) and you really can save an awful lot of money.

The benefit of either approach will depend on the individual needs, budget and preferences of the purchaser. And that's the end of it really.
 

ohanzee

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I'm quite particular about the performance of tools, earlier today I was in the shed trying to put all my masonry tools together for a bit of pointing I need to do soon, this includes a very expensive pointing trowel, wooden handle and stainless steel blade that I shortened a bit, and the other key tool is a plastic hawk that cost £4.99, because it's light and easy cleaned but also plastic is quieter to use than steel, the cheapo works better.

Key is how the kit performs for you, if the cost, be that low or high is the preoccupation, or what it looks like together or whatever it's become a style issue, no one cares what rod you have, all they see is the cast.
 
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LukeNZ

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I’m jealous of you living in one of them.. and maybe the burkheimers!
You are welcome to come and play with them, when travel permits. The delights of Hawke's Bay rivers and the Tongarariro National Park rivers and environs awaits! 👍
 
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LukeNZ

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I'm quite particular about the performance of tools, earlier today I was in the shed trying to put all my masonry tools together for a bit of pointing I need to do soon, this includes a very expensive pointing trowel, wooden handle and stainless steel blade that I shortened a bit, and the other key tool is a plastic hawk that cost £4.99, because it's light and easy cleaned but also plastic is quieter to use than steel, the cheapo works better.

Key is how the kit performs for you, if the cost, be that low or high is the preoccupation, or what it looks like together or whatever it's become a style issue, no one cares what rod you have, all they see is the cast.
I get that a lot on the big T.

...beautiful line skills mate, is it easy to do that kind of fishing?

And I just reply; get yourself a Meiz or Burkie brother 😎

And they have a look a feel and a go; and just say ooohhh.... yeah....., 😃

🙃
 
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LukeNZ

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I'm glad you posted that, as we can use this example to illustrate the point I (and others) have been making all along in this thread.

Around 12 years or so ago I wanted some new binoculars and was toying with buying a pair of Swarovski 8.5 x 42 EL (the full-fat version). I was discussing this with a colleague who asked how much they cost. After saying that it was around £1200 (the price at the time) my colleague said "Surely there's a happy medium and you don't have to spend that much?".

That 'voice of reason' made me do a bit more research. Enter a market disrupter... the Hawke Frontier ED 10x43 and 8x43, which had only just been launched at the time. After reading a few very favourable reviews (the findings of which seemed to have surprised the reviewer!) I decided to try a pair of 10 x 43s.

Shortly after buying them and getting that 'wow factor' looking through them, I met up with a very keen (and professional) birder colleague of mine. He had his 8.5 x 42 Swaro ELs with him (which he'd had for around 5 years or so by then - so probably a similar age to your binoculars now) and we were keen to compare our respective binoculars, so we swapped and did a quick comparison... and he went very quiet indeed.

I've been blessed with good eyesight (and still don't need to wear glasses) and I could immediately see that there appeared to be very little obvious difference indeed. Yes, the Swaro ELs were just a tiny bit sharper when looking across the whole field of view, but there really wasn't that big a difference. After we'd swapped back I asked my colleague why he hadn't suggested the Hawke Frontier ED as an option when I'd asked for his suggestions... to which he replied "That was before we realised just how bloody good they were!".

A subsequent test at 'dusk and beyond' showed my 10x43 Frontier EDs were just slightly behind in low light conditions.

The price difference? I paid £270 for my Hawke Frontier EDs, you'd have to add around £1000 to that to buy the 8.5x42 Swaro ELs at the time. I've since also bought a pair of 8x43 Frontier EDs (a slightly updated and improved model), the price? £140 as a clearance offer after a new model had been introduced! So I have two pairs of very usable binoculars of high optical quality for £410. Both pairs still work fine and are used fairly regularly by me for work purposes.

Don't get me wrong, if I used binoculars on a daily basis and they were my main tool for work, then I'd stump up the (at todays price) £1800 or so for a brand new pair of Swarovski EL 8.5x42 ELs. Why? Because I could justify the quite significant additional cost based on build quality, expected lifespan and additional image quality. But if they did break or get damaged and I had to send them in for repair I know I could get by quite comfortably with one or both of my sub-£300 Hawke Frontier EDs.

My point? Technology moves on, and these days paying a lot more money for something may well only bring a relatively small and incremental increase in build-quality, reliability and performance (if that!). Do your research, then choose wisely/drop lucky (delete as applicable) and you really can save an awful lot of money.

The benefit of either approach will depend on the individual needs, budget and preferences of the purchaser. And that's the end of it really.
Interesting.

Something I can tell you about Swarovski binoculars other than the obvious (they are fantastic in every way); this really blew me away.

My binos have been everywhere pole to pole literally. They have exceeded all my expectaions of performance, durability, reliability. So last year when I was watching some Tui's (a bird) in the kowhai blossom, the clarity of detail prompted me to think about how well the binos had served me over the many years.

So, I decided to contact Swarovski and let them know how pleased I have been with my old binos and to perhaps organise their first ever service after about 22 years of use.

They told me to drop them in to my local hunting shop 'Rivers to Ranges' in Hastings, Hawkes Bay - (who sell swarovski scopes + all the others etc). They gave me a receipt for them, and an odd kind of smile when I asked how much it was going to cost for the bino service, as they told me they get shipped through the distributor in Auckland, back to Austria...

About 3 months later I got a call from my local gun shop - my binos are back. So I swung by one afternoon, and was amazed that there was no charge at all - not even the freight charges.

When I got home later that evening, I unpackaged them - and they were no longer grubby green rubberised binos with all sorts of ingrained staining etc, but they looked and felt absolutely brand new. I even checked the serial number to be sure these were mine. The factory paperwork was also in the packaging - a huge list of parts and procedures all fitted initialled/signed and checked off; and in the price column for each, a zero.

I wont be alive by the time they need another service.., They have cost me to own for all these years, and the years to come about $2000 (the original purchase price) I cant even remember really, what it was exactly but remember it seemed 'up there' at the time. But looking back, and on balance it is actually nothing really - the cost is a lost in time irrelevance, in the overall scheme, and I would wholeheartedly buy them again - but even earlier in my life, if I had my time again. My originals were Zeiss from a grandparent - pretty well worn by the time I got them. They eventually took in moisture and got ditched in my homewares sale, before I set off on my migration travels.

🙃
 
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ohanzee

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You paid $2000 to look at flowers? and you think this is going to be useful after you snuff it?
 

hobnobdude

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Bristol
is Maxhacth realy that crap-ie ? i have no idea, but i had something in mind that cheap plastic rods maybe should be banned, too much plastics all over the place already. 🧐
You realise that all glass and carbon fibre rods are plastic don't you?

They are glass/carbon fibre impregnated with epoxy resin, plastic....
On the whole they are unrecyclable, there are technologies emerging but it only addresses reclamation of the carbon fibre. With the resin commonly removed by burning, it is an expensive process and the resulting product is poor. Due to the reclaimed fibre typically being chopped and short strand only.
There are some eco resins emerging but it's early days.
 

nymphist

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You realise that all glass and carbon fibre rods are plastic don't you?

They are glass/carbon fibre impregnated with epoxy resin, plastic....
On the whole they are unrecyclable, there are technologies emerging but it only addresses reclamation of the carbon fibre. With the resin commonly removed by burning, it is an expensive process and the resulting product is poor. Due to the reclaimed fibre typically being chopped and short strand only.
There are some eco resins emerging but it's early days.
Yep, thats why they probably shouldn't be mass produced, in order to do so maybe they shouldn't be sold cheap. ..
 

Dingbat

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Switzerland
I also live in spectacular countryside - I fish with cheap crap and still feel good about catching pristine wild fish in a perfect landscape.

Maxcrap and Shakey for me !!

Everyone to their own.



Douglas
I either case I doubt the fish feel good about anything in all this.
 

rusty

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Jun 18, 2006
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Warwickshire
.....but we all learned long ago, that you know nothing John Snow!

Cheap and completely shameless knock off's of first world line developments. Where does the money go - who gets it, what does it support, and contribute to anything? A sensible question.

🙃
I think it would be interesting if you comprehensively answered your own question.

Rusty
 

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