Role of the Wrist

Perch@1

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Mar 2, 2018
Messages
152
Location
South Wales
This subject is rarely discussed.
There are some who think the wrist should not be used at all in casting.
Others consider the use of the wrist at the end of the forward cast is to achieve-
- the final power snap
-drift
-'turndown' to avoid tailing loops
-rotation after translation
-the 'tap'
I know my view. What's yours?

Rusty
I'm learning double haul and I could be wrong in what I right here, ok rusty?

I might use the wrist by mistake but generally I prefer to keep the rod pushed up against my arm.

Perform cast, do what I've learned to double haul, but at the end of cast I always forget to shoot to the sky

But what I've learned today is when you perform the downup add bounce to it (thanks Paul B 👍) , might give improved line speed....... longer distance???

Fish safe and happy, Neil 🎣
 

Rhithrogena

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Jun 30, 2020
Messages
550
We all instinctively use the wrist and arm together when using any number of tools. Pick up a hammer and pretend to hit a nail into a wall. Now pretend it's a BIG nail and a lump hammer and watch your arm and the angle and direction of the of the hammer-head as your arm comes back.....

Now just do that with your rod. It might help to imagine standing between two walls a few feet apart. You're going to hit a nail into the wall behind you with the back of the hammer and then come foward and hit the one in front. Simples.

Any kid can instinctively do this well. Give a kid a stick with a ball of mud stuck to the end and tell them to flick the mud off in front of them. Then get them to flick the mud behind....
Some talk about painting a ceiling, flicking water off a brush etc., all useful analogies, but BE the kid with the stick...
 

rusty

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Joined
Jun 18, 2006
Messages
1,429
Location
Powys
Here are interesting exerts-

'........controlled wrist break can be massively beneficial, particularly when driving a fly into a niiggling breeze
by 'controlled' we mean deliberate when the actual wrist break on a back cast occurs after we've stopped the rod tip. Now, as we wait for the line to unfurl behind us, we can crank our wrist open, which in turn moves the rod tip back as well. This powerless movement is similar to drift, which generally involves repositioning of the hand and forearm.

When it comes to completing the forward cast now we can tap forward with the wrist still open.Only when the forearm has nearly stopped moving do we snap the wrist shut by flipping it forward in one swift movement. As little force is required now, chances are the rod will not be subjected to unwanted shock and buckle unnecessarily. Instead the rod moves extremely quicklythrough a wide arc generating massive line speed so the line literally zips out.'

The above was written by Paul Proctor in a Trout Fisherman article on Casting into a Headwind March 2018.

Interesting!

Rusty
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
152
Location
South Wales
We all instinctively use the wrist and arm together when using any number of tools. Pick up a hammer and pretend to hit a nail into a wall. Now pretend it's a BIG nail and a lump hammer and watch your arm and the angle and direction of the of the hammer-head as your arm comes back.....

Now just do that with your rod. It might help to imagine standing between two walls a few feet apart. You're going to hit a nail into the wall behind you with the back of the hammer and then come foward and hit the one in front. Simples.

Any kid can instinctively do this well. Give a kid a stick with a ball of mud stuck to the end and tell them to flick the mud off in front of them. Then get them to flick the mud behind....
Some talk about painting a ceiling, flicking water off a brush etc., all useful analogies, but BE the kid with the stick...
Thank you for advice Rithogena.

Fish safe and happy, Neil 🎣
 

Perch@1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
152
Location
South Wales
Here are interesting exerts-

'........controlled wrist break can be massively beneficial, particularly when driving a fly into a niiggling breeze
by 'controlled' we mean deliberate when the actual wrist break on a back cast occurs after we've stopped the rod tip. Now, as we wait for the line to unfurl behind us, we can crank our wrist open, which in turn moves the rod tip back as well. This powerless movement is similar to drift, which generally involves repositioning of the hand and forearm.

When it comes to completing the forward cast now we can tap forward with the wrist still open.Only when the forearm has nearly stopped moving do we snap the wrist shut by flipping it forward in one swift movement. As little force is required now, chances are the rod will not be subjected to unwanted shock and buckle unnecessarily. Instead the rod moves extremely quicklythrough a wide arc generating massive line speed so the line literally zips out.'

The above was written by Paul Proctor in a Trout Fisherman article on Casting into a Headwind March 2018.

Interesting!

Rusty
Cheers Rusty something I need to include in my double hauling.

Fish safe and happy, Neil 🎣
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
3,203
Location
West Oxfordshire
We all instinctively use the wrist and arm together when using any number of tools. Pick up a hammer and pretend to hit a nail into a wall. Now pretend it's a BIG nail and a lump hammer and watch your arm and the angle and direction of the of the hammer-head as your arm comes back.....

Now just do that with your rod. It might help to imagine standing between two walls a few feet apart. You're going to hit a nail into the wall behind you with the back of the hammer and then come foward and hit the one in front. Simples.

Any kid can instinctively do this well. Give a kid a stick with a ball of mud stuck to the end and tell them to flick the mud off in front of them. Then get them to flick the mud behind....
Some talk about painting a ceiling, flicking water off a brush etc., all useful analogies, but BE the kid with the stick...
Thanks for this, a really good analogy.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
42,501
We all instinctively use the wrist and arm together when using any number of tools. Pick up a hammer and pretend to hit a nail into a wall. Now pretend it's a BIG nail and a lump hammer and watch your arm and the angle and direction of the of the hammer-head as your arm comes back.....

Now just do that with your rod. It might help to imagine standing between two walls a few feet apart. You're going to hit a nail into the wall behind you with the back of the hammer and then come foward and hit the one in front. Simples.

Any kid can instinctively do this well. Give a kid a stick with a ball of mud stuck to the end and tell them to flick the mud off in front of them. Then get them to flick the mud behind....
Some talk about painting a ceiling, flicking water off a brush etc., all useful analogies, but BE the kid with the stick...

I saw quite a nice one, old but wise instructor finishes his coffee and handed the cardboard cup to a beginner then asked him to half fill it with water, stand in the water and flick the water out of the cup over his shoulder and get as far as he could, he did it a couple of times and got it quite far, then he said get it to go that far with less effort, then do the same forwards.

It worked but what it did mainly was stop him overthinking it and just do it naturally.
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
550
I saw quite a nice one, old but wise instructor finishes his coffee and handed the cardboard cup to a beginner then asked him to half fill it with water, stand in the water and flick the water out of the cup over his shoulder and get as far as he could, he did it a couple of times and got it quite far, then he said get it to go that far with less effort, then do the same forwards.

It worked but what it did mainly was stop him overthinking it and just do it naturally.
like when kids learn to flick each other with tea-towels....
You get the most hurt with a fast tip, and you control the speed with the wrist 😉
 

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