Role of the Wrist

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,188
Location
Wiltshire
That's very interesting, I believe that kinaesthetic learners make up a very small proportion of people but maybe as you say they are the ones drawn fly fishing.
I supposes that by default most fly casting tuition is kinaesthetic.
Probably explains why some pick it up quite easily and others less so, and sometimes not at all.

Obviously there has to be an element of visual and auditory teaching in casting. We need to explain the relationship between the rod, reel, line, leader and fly and demonstrate how they all fit together before they get their grubby mitts on it.

They need to learn, within reason, how to stand and how to hold the rod and line and operate those two things to achieve the desired objective which is landing a fly on the water so that a fish can take it.

The more physically-minded often have quite good hand/eye coordination and that helps.

Reading PaulD's description of trying to teach his friend how to shoot reminded me of the most awkward person I ever tried to teach. He announced at the start that he had been fishing for several years for carp on big gravel pits. At first I was not too concerned about this until he got the rod in his hand. He simply could not get the principle that if you want the line, leader and fly to go forwards, first they have to go backwards. This was totally alien to him. His whole fishing life had revolved around punching a heavy lead 150 yards out into a lake, so the rod simple went to the upright position two handed and wallop. The whole concept that one hand manages the rod and the other hand manages the line was meaningless.

It took several glasses of chardonnay that evening to get over it all - and NO, the b*gger didn't give me a tip!
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
3,436
Location
West Oxfordshire
Probably explains why some pick it up quite easily and others less so, and sometimes not at all.

Obviously there has to be an element of visual and auditory teaching in casting. We need to explain the relationship between the rod, reel, line, leader and fly and demonstrate how they all fit together before they get their grubby mitts on it.

They need to learn, within reason, how to stand and how to hold the rod and line and operate those two things to achieve the desired objective which is landing a fly on the water so that a fish can take it.

The more physically-minded often have quite good hand/eye coordination and that helps.

Reading PaulD's description of trying to teach his friend how to shoot reminded me of the most awkward person I ever tried to teach. He announced at the start that he had been fishing for several years for carp on big gravel pits. At first I was not too concerned about this until he got the rod in his hand. He simply could not get the principle that if you want the line, leader and fly to go forwards, first they have to go backwards. This was totally alien to him. His whole fishing life had revolved around punching a heavy lead 150 yards out into a lake, so the rod simple went to the upright position two handed and wallop. The whole concept that one hand manages the rod and the other hand manages the line was meaningless.

It took several glasses of chardonnay that evening to get over it all - and NO, the b*gger didn't give me a tip!
I have a client who I've now taken out a few times who is an ex 1st Class cricketer and a scratch golfer. You'd of thought he'd have picked fly-casting up easily... nope!
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,188
Location
Wiltshire
I have a client who I've now taken out a few times who is an ex 1st Class cricketer and a scratch golfer. You'd of thought he'd have picked fly-casting up easily... nope!
Actually Andy, when you consider that both those sports require both hands to work close together whereas casting requires the hands to work separately and to perform different tasks at the same time. No, not too surprising that he has struggled.
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
3,436
Location
West Oxfordshire
Actually Andy, when you consider that both those sports require both hands to work close together whereas casting requires the hands to work separately and to perform different tasks at the same time. No, not too surprising that he has struggled.
We did discuss it and the main problem seemed to be getting his head round the idea of the stop.
Both golf and cricket have a follow-through action so the concept of stoping the 'club' or 'bat' was alien to him.
We got there eventually though.
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,188
Location
Wiltshire
Having done the role of the wrist in some detail, perhaps we need to consider the role of the other arm in casting. For the sake of clarity I always refer to this as the line hand and it is every bit as important in casting as the rod hand.
 

rusty

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 18, 2006
Messages
1,470
Location
Warwickshire
Non-rod arm. Yes, another subject all together. Americans call this line control.

A part of line control is holding the line under a finger of the rod hand after casting.
Most people use the index finger. I use the next finger, or you might call it the centre finger. This was recommended to me by an American and I have subsequently complied. I cannot remember all the declared advantages but I have no intention of changing after all these years.

The prime uses of the non-rod hand/arm is to ensure line tension is maintained, for all retrieving activity, line shooting and for hauling. Each an area for discusion.

What you do with your non-rod hand/arm is just as important as what you do with your rod hand if you are serious about casting.

Rusty
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
43,832
I would like to see looping spare line with the line hand off the ground recognised as a skill.

That is if anyone remembers what I'm talking about.
 
Top