Salmon fly hooks

petevicar

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
1,445
Location
Right bank of the river Rhine.
Hi All,
I have decided this winter that I would try to get back into fly tying.
Most of my flies have been very simple for saltwater and some very simple salmon flies.

I would like to try tying some better salmon flies and who knows maybe after a few years I could get into some classics.

Simple starting question what hooks should I use?

I have all sorts of feathers etc. So I thought I would experiment.

Thanks in advance

Pete
 

arkle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
Messages
8,987
Hi Pete, Drop me a p.m. with your contact details & if you could be online & have a notepad to hand,

John
 

ackroyd

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
225
Hi Petevicar,
If you are thinking of tying long Dee and Spey flies eventually, you may wish to start accumulating Partridge HE2's now. They come in 1/0, 2/0 and 3/0. I understand your reservations regarding classic salmon flies at this early stage, but nonetheless I would make the point that if you were to start learning how to tie the simpler Dee and Spey patterns (most if not all of which do not involve married or built wings), you will find that your general tying will improve because, among other discoveries, you will learn a lot about thread management. If you can spare the cash, treat yourself to a copy of John Shewey's book on Dee and Spey Flies. It is a fascinating read and I learned a huge amount from it when it came out many years ago.

Just a final thought - addiction to fly-dressing is a disease for which there is no known cure, manifesting itself in the unnecessary accumulation of colossal quantities of materials over one's lifetime. If you want to be a fly-dresser, first buy yourself a shed or even a garage.
 

petevicar

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
1,445
Location
Right bank of the river Rhine.
Hi Petevicar,
If you are thinking of tying long Dee and Spey flies eventually, you may wish to start accumulating Partridge HE2's now. They come in 1/0, 2/0 and 3/0. I understand your reservations regarding classic salmon flies at this early stage, but nonetheless I would make the point that if you were to start learning how to tie the simpler Dee and Spey patterns (most if not all of which do not involve married or built wings), you will find that your general tying will improve because, among other discoveries, you will learn a lot about thread management. If you can spare the cash, treat yourself to a copy of John Shewey's book on Dee and Spey Flies. It is a fascinating read and I learned a huge amount from it when it came out many years ago.

Just a final thought - addiction to fly-dressing is a disease for which there is no known cure, manifesting itself in the unnecessary accumulation of colossal quantities of materials over one's lifetime. If you want to be a fly-dresser, first buy yourself a shed or even a garage.
Thanks for the advice.

I'll try very hard to not get too much stuff.
I really want to start with flies that I may use at sometime and then progress.

Pete
 
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