Sea Fly rod

sailingval

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Dec 19, 2010
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At present I use a Greys GRXi 9'6" #8 rod for fishing from the back of our sailing boat (mainly an excuse for watching the sun set), as I don't want to use my Hardy fly rods in salt water.
I am finding this rod too heavy and would prefer to have a 9'6" #6 rod, however I don't use it that much and therefore don't want to spend very much.

Any suggestions welcomed.
 

JoeOh

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Sunset, sounds idyllic. Are you estuary moored ?
What fish are you targeting
Good luck, envious me...
 

aenoon

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At present I use a Greys GRXi 9'6" #8 rod for fishing from the back of our sailing boat (mainly an excuse for watching the sun set), as I don't want to use my Hardy fly rods in salt water.
I am finding this rod too heavy and would prefer to have a 9'6" #6 rod, however I don't use it that much and therefore don't want to spend very much.

Any suggestions welcomed.
Does not really matter which brand you are using, only thing that is important is that rod is impervious to salt. Rings, reel seat and handle should all be salt water rated, some of the lower end offerings will quickly degrade if used in saltwater.
But more importantly is the way you treat it after use. Total immersion in fresh water, and hosed down in same!

Bert
 

Sash

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Where are you fishing (country etc?), and what for?
If mullet and bass in the UK or Med, then start with the Maxcatch rods: cheap, cheerful, and do the job.
If you are somewhere tropical, then I would not necessarily want to start with a 6-weight!

I think you are right not to risk your Hardys, although I have fished for mullet in marinas for many years with a Graphite Smuggler. But I was obsessive about rinsing it off each time; modern rods, even cheap ones, are far better at resisting corrosion.
 

Elwyman

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You will, probably find a 9' rod easier. Snowbee have a #8 saltwater rod, which is what you really need for casting heavier flies.

 

sailingval

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What flies are you casting, the conditions sound benign, why 9ft6in?
I seem to like 9'6" for my still water fishing. The
Where are you fishing (country etc?), and what for?
If mullet and bass in the UK or Med, then start with the Maxcatch rods: cheap, cheerful, and do the job.
If you are somewhere tropical, then I would not necessarily want to start with a 6-weight!

I think you are right not to risk your Hardys, although I have fished for mullet in marinas for many years with a Graphite Smuggler. But I was obsessive about rinsing it off each time; modern rods, even cheap ones, are far better at resisting corrosion.
 

sailingval

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West Coast of Scotland, mainly targeting mackeral and what ever else might swim by. I have no experience in sea fishing - as I said it is a pleasant way of watching the sun set.

Finding #8 rather heavy hence thinking about #6. I think it will be a saltwater rod (I have a set of reels that I keep for salt water and I always take my freshwater rods in case I get the opportunity to fish a loch or two.

Having said that I would like to actually catch more.
 

Sash

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6-weight will be fine for mackerel if they are close to the surface, but in my view you might find yourself seriously outclassed if you hook a decent pollack: a real recipe for a broken rod, so I would want to get one with a decent warranty! Or a really cheap one (i.e. Maxcatch).

My opinion (and experience) is that the advantages of reach and the ability to dibble a fly with a longer rod are almost non-existant fishing off a yacht. But you might find a 9-footer has less swing weight, and hence is easier on the arm.

Would you settle for a 7-weight?
 

sailingval

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6-weight will be fine for mackerel if they are close to the surface, but in my view you might find yourself seriously outclassed if you hook a decent pollack: a real recipe for a broken rod, so I would want to get one with a decent warranty! Or a really cheap one (i.e. Maxcatch).

My opinion (and experience) is that the advantages of reach and the ability to dibble a fly with a longer rod are almost non-existant fishing off a yacht. But you might find a 9-footer has less swing weight, and hence is easier on the arm.

Would you settle for a 7-weight?

Possibly.
 

original cormorant

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Not far short of 99% of saltwater fishing is done with 9ft rods because generally it works best in most circumstance, so to use a different length you ought to have a strong reason to do so. The weight of line you use depends on the size of fly and weather conditions. Watching the sun set implies calm conditions, and I'd be happy casting size 2 flies in calm conditions on a #6.

If a good size pollack reaches cover it makes no difference whether it's attached to a #6 or a #8. Breaking a rod is generally user error. You pays your money and makes your choice.

Colin McC is stalking fish with small flies - an entirely different set of circumstances.
 

aenoon

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Has Timy mullet not got himself down to a five weight?
If you can handle larger flies on #5/6 then they are fine for the job, it then boils down to the reel, (drag and backing capacity) and ultimately the ability of the person holding the rod.
Have landed some impressive bones and odd snook on #6 rod, but the reel did most of the work (tibor).

Bert
 

Sash

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The OP is "fishing from the back of my sailing boat", I would have thought #5 with a single fly is very achievable.
IMHO the issue is less the casting of the fly (although a #2 Clouser is a heavy old thing!) than the landing of a pollack!
If you are off a boat, then there is going to be as much lifting as stopping a run (unlike mullet in estuaries, bonefish, permit etc, where the fight is predominantly about turning a running fish).
Me, I would settle for a #7 (or heavier!)
 

timmy mullet

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Has Timy mullet not got himself down to a five weight?
5 or 6 weight. Handles mullet to 12lb+ and bass to 7lb no problem.
Also no problem using fresh water rods, reels and lines in the salt as long as you rinse all tackle off after each session...including flies, which I tie on bronzed hooks for mullet.
 

timmy mullet

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If you can handle larger flies on #5/6 then they are fine for the job, it then boils down to the reel, (drag and backing capacity) and ultimately the ability of the person holding the rod.
Have landed some impressive bones and odd snook on #6 rod, but the reel did most of the work (tibor).

Bert
Had all but two of my permit on 6wts while fishing for bones. Long as you have plenty backing and it's medium sized its not a problem 😄
 

chrisrfoster

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John Norris have some Guideline Stoked on offer Rod Reel and line for about £160 to £170 depending on size. I picked up a 10ft 6wt last week
 
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