Second World War Novels

delray

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On Kindle I've read 2 novels recently on WW2, but focussing on Italy, the first one Naples and the second one Milan and the North.
I guess we've always focussed on our own misery re wars and as kids we were always fed a certain line regarding Italy's 'role' in WW2 hence it was interesting to get a different, for me, viewpoint, and blimey, the Italians had a rough time of it.
In case anyone's interested they are 'Beneath A Scarlet Sky' (Milan) and 'From These Broken Streets'.
Most of our Kindle books are free with Prime so I have to think these 2 are as well.
 

arawa

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On the same theme, try Walter Kempowski "All for Nothing" or Ralf Rothman "To Die in Spring".
Both books are beautifully written but bleakly evocative on the impact war has on ordinary people - in this case Germans. And, as with your Italian recommendations, from a perspective we do not usually see.
 

easker1

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a Bridge too far, The citadel, the long walk home, and if you like the 1st world war , the Battle for the Bundu, easker1
 

Vermontdrifter

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My Dad did the long walk from Salerno to Orbatello south of Florence and always said that the Italian civilians were got the dirty end if the stick. Only place he saw comparable misery and damage was in Alsace but the fighting was over much quicker there. Watch John Houston’s, ‘Battle of San Pietro’,
to see the intensity of the fighting. Marshal had to approve it’s release as it was thought it would destroy civilian morale. My father’s division but not his regiment, he was on one of the mountains flanking the village. Either that or look up the report on the crossing of the Rapido River where the 36th division took over 60% casualties in 48 hours.

I would recommend, ‘A walk in the sun’, to get a feel for the infantryman’s experience in Italy.
 
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easker1

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Nicola Tesla the man who invented the 20th Century, how about ""1421" by Gavin Menzies, , or Leland Stowe, The Hermit of lonesome lake, if you can find it, or Negley Farson " The story of a lake, definitely non fiction, easker1
 

kingf000

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I've just read 'The secret war in Italy' by William Fowler. Not a novel and much detail on the role of the Italians in the fight against the Germans and how Italy was politically split. Very nasty and very bloody. I was hoping to find out more about my late father, who was part of an Intelligence corps. liasing with the 8th army, as I have been unable to obtain any details of his war record.
 

glueman

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I've just read 'The secret war in Italy' by William Fowler. Not a novel and much detail on the role of the Italians in the fight against the Germans and how Italy was politically split. Very nasty and very bloody. I was hoping to find out more about my late father, who was part of an Intelligence corps. liasing with the 8th army, as I have been unable to obtain any details of his war record.
Do you have his service number and regiment if so try searching the national archives. I found my grandfathers record in them but it was WW1. Good luck
 

len1

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The historian James Holland relaxes by writing novels about a sergeant called Tanner. Although complete works of fiction as you would expect they have sound historical backgrounds and details.
Separately Holland’s latest history book is ‘Sicily 43’. Well worth reading.
 

delray

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Catch22 is a good read!
But an odd film i seem to remember. Did you watch the series made recently, 2 years or so ago? It's been so long since I read the book, I'm not sure there were many similarities apart from the 'Catch 22'. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
 

easker1

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I read a good book about the last German U-boat making a trip to Argentina, it was supposed to have Hitler on board , the sub skipper didn't want to give up to the Allies,I cant remember the name , but it was readable, easker1
 

raphael

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If you consider it started before 1939 (indeed, there were some first signs in Spain...), then go to Hemingway's "For whom the bell tolls".
May be you can find "The silence of the sea" by Vercors, dealing with German occupation in France.

If you're interested in the other party point of view, let's try "'The kindly ones" by Jonathan Little( big book, will keep you busy for a while), or also "Death is my trade", by Robert Merle.

R
 
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