Sinking/intermediate lines on a 5wt outfit - futile?

mattbray85

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Jan 30, 2018
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Hello all,

Still a relative novice angler, I have exclusively fished small stillwaters, using a 5wt rod and floating line.

As I gain in experience and ability, I'm more aware of the requirement for intermediate and sinking lines in certain conditions (even on small waters). Also, I have an opportunity to try my hand fishing reservoirs later in the year, where I expect the flexibility afforded by sinking lines will be of benefit.

The majority of tackle articles and product descriptions seem to refer to 7/8wt outfits being best suited for fishing heavier, sinking lines but plenty of 5wt sinkers are available. So my question is simple (he says!): is it worth me purchasing additional line types to use with my 5wt outfit? Or will casting them be difficult to the extent that it would be better to add a rod to the collection that is more suited to casting heavier lines?

I will say that I'm an improving angler, with an "alright" cast.

Thanks in advance, recommendations for a "portfolio" of line densities to start off with also welcome.

















×
 

anzac

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It's just my opinion, but an intermediate line, being a compromise, may prove more useful.

I have sinking lines, but only use them in deeper waters. The reservoirs my son and I fish when I visit him in the US are deep water reservoirs with higher surface water temperatures (think mid-summer fishing in Southern California).
 

aenoon

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Hello all,

Still a relative novice angler, I have exclusively fished small stillwaters, using a 5wt rod and floating line.

As I gain in experience and ability, I'm more aware of the requirement for intermediate and sinking lines in certain conditions (even on small waters). Also, I have an opportunity to try my hand fishing reservoirs later in the year, where I expect the flexibility afforded by sinking lines will be of benefit.

The majority of tackle articles and product descriptions seem to refer to 7/8wt outfits being best suited for fishing heavier, sinking lines but plenty of 5wt sinkers are available. So my question is simple (he says!): is it worth me purchasing additional line types to use with my 5wt outfit? Or will casting them be difficult to the extent that it would be better to add a rod to the collection that is more suited to casting heavier lines?

I will say that I'm an improving angler, with an "alright" cast.

Thanks in advance, recommendations for a "portfolio" of line densities to start off with also welcome.

















×
Theoretically you should be able to cast a sinking line easier, and further than a floater of same line rating!
Problem occurs when you start trying to fire out bigger lures/flies on the lighter ratings.
Is why shops reccommend #7/8 for sinking line work, as they assume you are using bigger, heavier lures/flies.
If you are only going to use the same type of flies(size, weight) on the sinking #5 set up, then should be no problem at all.
regards
Bert
 

original cormorant

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Before you start to assemble a portfolio of lines for reservoir fishing it's vital to decide on the weight because once you've invested in lines of one weight changing to a different weight will be an expensive decision. Thats the important fork in the road for you at the moment.

You don't say what sort of reservoir fishing you'll be doing - bank or boat. Also you don't say the length of your present rod. For a boat rod you are best to be looking at 10ft.

My guess is that your present rod is 9ft #5 . That will be fine for reservoir bank fishing. I fish reservoir banks with three lines - a fast intermediate, a di5 and a floater. Probably 80% of the time I'm using the floater. I also carry poly leaders for VERY occasional use.

For boat fishing most anglers have abandoned #8 and fish #6 or #7, with there being a trend to lighter lines. If you are setting up for boat fishing you will start to acquire a portfolio of lines - at least 6 and probably several more than that). If so then you should get a cartridge type reel and buy more cartridges than you think you could ever need because the reel will get discontinued and you won't have a spool for the latest must have line.

The starter 6 is floater, slow inter, fast inter, di3, di5, di7. Add to that hover, second floaters, various sinking tips, sweep lines, maybe di8 and you can get to a dozen without trying too hard.
 

lee71

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How deep is the small Stillwater you are fishing, I use a 9ft #5 for nearly all my fishing, I use floaters,inters and medium sinkers but the sinker rarely comes out unless I'm fishing in winter as the areas of waters I usually fish are not much more than 6 to 12 ft deep and I still manage lures up to size 8. I do fish from a boat now and again and still use my 9ft rods but if I fished from a boat more regularly I'd choose a 10ft rod.
Your #5 will cope with a #5 sinker same as a #7 will cope with a #7 sinker. 👍
 

bobmiddlepoint

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If you are only going to use the same type of flies(size, weight) on the sinking #5 set up, then should be no problem at all.
regards
Bert
This is the important bit, the size/weight of the fly you are casting.
Sunk line fishing doesn't have to be about heavy lines, big lures and pulling like a mad man, it can be just as delicate as floating line fishing. A lighter (AFTM No.) line will always give you more feel and feedback.
I have a DT5 Wet Cel 2 (there is a museum piece!) that I use occasionally for long but sparse lightweight sea trout lures on small rivers at night and it's also had a few outings on the lochs from a boat with size 10 & 12 wet flies.


Andy
 

tangled

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The clue is in the line weight - a #5 rod will cast a #5 line made of any material (so long as both rod and lines have been made correctly.)

You may actually find it easier to cast the sinking line as it's thinner and there's usually no need to use anything more than a 9’ leader with them as the line is sunk and pretty much invisible (there are exceptions, including even shorter leaders, 3’ for boobies for example.)

The bigger point, as has been pointed out, is the size and weight of the fly. Sinking lines tend to be associated with big and heavy lures which are a sod to cast with a light rod and line, but they don't need to be. You can use small flies on sinking lines quite effectively.
 

ejw

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Mattbray85
I have used 5wt (and below) for all my fishing for over 20 years, I only use two lines, a floater and a slime line, this is for all my stillwater fishing, I only use a floater for the river. I do not use any fast sing lines and still seem to do ok. Fly wise I do not go any larger than a size 10 (Kamasan B175) I tie my own lures (mini lure on a size 10 ) Again no issues with catches. I have learned not to expect 40 yards + but it does help your choice of where on a lake or pool to fish ! Most of my fishing on lakes now is a 4wt with a 9' or 10' rod. I use the Slime line as it is transparent and means I can fish a "short" leader.
Hope this helps
 

Gdog

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I have a floating, sink tip, intermediate and type 3 sinker for my 9' #5 rods which I used for fishing smaller waters stocked with rainbows. I only use the type 3 sinker in winter or really bright days when I need to fish deeper. There should be no problem casting a 5 weight type 3 sinker on most five weight rods, a softer 9' #5 rod with a through action might struggle.
A more powerful 9' # 5 should be able to cast a type 5 sinker, there is a big diversity in power with this rod / line weight. Which rod do you own?
 

mattbray85

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Thank you all, very useful tips.

I entered into fly fishing with a 9' and have recently purchased a 10'. No particular design towards a boat rod at that stage, just got a good deal on it.

I think I will try a fast inter, and maybe a DI3/5 to start out with.

Thanks for all the responses.
 

speytime

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I think providing its the right weight it'll be fine, all 5 wts should be the same weight regardless of the density.
Because sink lines are thinner they do cast much faster because there's less resistance, if your fishing regular sized flies, imo a weight under would be good for anything over a di3 above that imo lines start not being very enjoyable to cast, 1 wt lighter would help.

It needn't be expensive you can a decent enough sink/inter lines for £6/8 to try them out, I've got the airflo range but my maxcatch slow sink and my talon inter £6/8 still get plenty use.

Al
 
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shpeil

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So... would you say that fast actioned rods are better at handling sunk lines than through action rods?
 
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