Sinking/intermediate lines on a 5wt outfit - futile?

LukeNZ

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Thank you all, very useful tips.

I entered into fly fishing with a 9' and have recently purchased a 10'. No particular design towards a boat rod at that stage, just got a good deal on it.

I think I will try a fast inter, and maybe a DI3/5 to start out with.

Thanks for all the responses.
Think of line weight, as being relative to the weight of the fly you want to cast. It takes more mass to cast more mass.

Rod length is unrelated to that, in general use.
 

shpeil

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Re soft v fast action rods for handling sinking lines, I wasn't thinking so much of handling the line in the air, but in terms of picking up line off the water. I've got a first generation hardy marskman drifter, 11 foot 5 weight, which is a through action rod. Good for small brownies and short to medium lengths of floating lines from a boat but I'm not confident it would be the best tool for using sinking lines. Would be interested in your views as to whether a faster action would make life easier with a sinking line. Will probably go down to 10 foot too - after 7 hours waving the 11 footer around, I was beginning to feel it. (Probably something to do with middle age fast approaching as well!)
 

tangled

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You need to tell us what kind of fishing you'll be doing - 11’ #5 is a pretty specialist rod.

Are you bank or boat, river or lake, large or small waters, lures or naturals? Trout?

Very generally, a medium fast 9’ #5 will do pretty much everything except comfortably cast big heavy lures. A medium fast 9’6” #7 will cast most trout and small salmon lures and be useful for bigger fish too.

They're the only single handed rods I use and I fish rivers and lakes large and small, dry, nymph and lures for salmon, trout and sea trout from bank and boat, floating, intermediate and sinking lines. I only choose between them for size of lure, distance of cast required and size of fish, not type of line (though size of fish is not terribly relevant, you can pull a dingy with #5 rod.)
 

original cormorant

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Re soft v fast action rods for handling sinking lines, I wasn't thinking so much of handling the line in the air, but in terms of picking up line off the water.
It's against my better judgement to advise others how to fish, but as a general principle I don't think you (=one) should be picking up line off the water - you should fish the cast out and most of the time be hanging the flies. With a sinking line you "can't" pick up line off the water you have to fish the cast out.
 

kingf000

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I'm a bit confused here with some of the replies. By definition, an AFTM 5# should weigh (about) the same in the first 30ft of line whether it is a floating, intermediate or sinking. The sinking will have a thinner diameter and so have a higher density. I'm assuming that the sunken line is drawn back so that when casting only a short section is still submerged. Trying to lift 30ft of sunken line would cause problems with any rod. So the 5# rod should be able to cope with all the 5# lines equally effectively. The issue comes with the weight of the fly. A good, modern, 5# rod should be able to cope with most flies apart from the really big, wet lures, as the extra weight is a greater proportion of the total weight than, say if you have a 7# rod and line. So if you stick to the 5# rod, just use the flies that the rod is capable of handling! I'm sure you will still catch fish on the smaller lures.
 

Paul_B

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I have 10" 8# set up which I use for everything from floater (especially in poor weather) to intermediate or sinker if fish aren't topping etc.
I also have a 10" 6# used exclusively as a floater, both rods are with me all the time and I can swap as soon as the fish change their feeding habit.
 

ejw

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I tend to use 5wt or below. I am fishing a small water comp tomorrow and will be using a 11' 3wt with a floater and a 9' 4wt with slime line. Fish will be in the 2lb to 8lb range, do not see an issue.
 

aenoon

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I'm a bit confused here with some of the replies. By definition, an AFTM 5# should weigh (about) the same in the first 30ft of line whether it is a floating, intermediate or sinking. The sinking will have a thinner diameter and so have a higher density. I'm assuming that the sunken line is drawn back so that when casting only a short section is still submerged. Trying to lift 30ft of sunken line would cause problems with any rod. So the 5# rod should be able to cope with all the 5# lines equally effectively. The issue comes with the weight of the fly. A good, modern, 5# rod should be able to cope with most flies apart from the really big, wet lures, as the extra weight is a greater proportion of the total weight than, say if you have a 7# rod and line. So if you stick to the 5# rod, just use the flies that the rod is capable of handling! I'm sure you will still catch fish on the smaller lures.
If from a boat, you are trying to lift 30' of the sinking line out of the water on a consistent basis, I would repectfully suggest you aint fishing the water properly!
Sure, once in a while you might want to try do it to cover a rise, would be difficult without a roll cast first, but should not be a regular occurence trying to lift out 30' of sinking line!
regards
Bert
 

kingf000

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If from a boat, you are trying to lift 30' of the sinking line out of the water on a consistent basis, I would repectfully suggest you aint fishing the water properly!
Sure, once in a while you might want to try do it to cover a rise, would be difficult without a roll cast first, but should not be a regular occurence trying to lift out 30' of sinking line!
regards
Bert
I would respectfully say that I did not say that I am trying to lift 30ft of sunken line. I said that I am assuming that the sunken line is drawn back, by that I meant that the line had been retrieved so that only a few feet of line is left outside the rod tip. Apologies if it wasn't clear.
 

aenoon

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I would respectfully say that I did not say that I am trying to lift 30ft of sunken line. I said that I am assuming that the sunken line is drawn back, by that I meant that the line had been retrieved so that only a few feet of line is left outside the rod tip. Apologies if it wasn't clear.
Was not a dig at your comment was a bit more of an elaboration!
regards
Bert
 

LukeNZ

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I tend to use 5wt or below. I am fishing a small water comp tomorrow and will be using a 11' 3wt with a floater and a 9' 4wt with slime line. Fish will be in the 2lb to 8lb range, do not see an issue.
Show us your 8lb.er’s... 😀
 

LukeNZ

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I would respectfully say that I did not say that I am trying to lift 30ft of sunken line. I said that I am assuming that the sunken line is drawn back, by that I meant that the line had been retrieved so that only a few feet of line is left outside the rod tip. Apologies if it wasn't clear.
...just winch the warp back to the doors (otter boards); before shooting the gear again!

A common term when deep sea bottom trawling, and pulling 80 tonne bags up the ramp every 4 hours - it also seems to fit your fly fishing methodology..🙃
 
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