sinking the tippet with pva?

teeser

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I've always meant to try anti-fog spray for car windows - From my reckoning it must be hydrophilic so should work well and last a decent time.

Steve
is that the same stuff as rainex which is a water repellant i have used it for wiping my fly line with to clean it and help it float the stuff i put in my fullers earth mix is glycerin and some rinse aid for the dishwasher and some fairy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I've always meant to try anti-fog spray for car windows - From my reckoning it must be hydrophilic so should work well and last a decent time.

Steve
The thing I have found is, it's a damned if you do and damned if you don't sort of thing. If it's hydrophilic, well, you are throwing it into water and it will wash straight off, first cast. If it's lipophilic/hydrophobic, and you coat the leader with it, then it will stick in the surface film just as surely as if you had coated it with lard.

I was out on Monday for the first time in 3 months. I fished stillwater dries all day - a lot of the time in near flat calm conditions. And it was one of those days where, despite nylon being only 5-10% denser than water, and it tending to catch the surface film on touch down, it wasn't too bad a day for being able to keep the nylon below surface. I was seeing 'the floaties' as we call them (when you can spot the leader is floating), and I spotted a few aborted takes when I had them, but given how impossible some folk make it out to be to get nylon to sink in calm conditions, it really wasn't too difficult. Just a regular rub through my Fuller's Earth/glycerin/washing-up-liquid/wetting agent mix was doing what was needed to catch fish.

Col
 

themind

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is that the same stuff as rainex which is a water repellant i have used it for wiping my fly line with to clean it and help it float the stuff i put in my fullers earth mix is glycerin and some rinse aid for the dishwasher and some fairy
No, you get rainex for the outside to repel water and the antifog for the inside to stop it beading.
 
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themind

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The thing I have found is, it's a damned if you do and damned if you don't sort of thing. If it's hydrophilic, well, you are throwing it into water and it will wash straight off, first cast. If it's lipophilic/hydrophobic, and you coat the leader with it, then it will stick in the surface film just as surely as if you had coated it with lard.
Not sure about that, makes sense if its a wet compound when fishing, like washing up liquid, but the anti-fog is meant to be applied then allowed to dry. Its fairly resistant to me cleaning the car windows so it must have a decent lifespan. I also keep thinking about using it to coat a batch of wet flies and nymphs (the unweighted ones that always seem to float for a bit such as unweighted hares ear nymphs etc)

Steve
 

dave b

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If you want to sink the tippet put a No 10 stotz on the line 6ins behind the fly, (it's like a square split shot but they stay on the line better). It'll weigh less than a decent sized hook and will sink the first 18ins quickly and the fly will hold it up. It's called back shotting and is what match anglers do when fishing small pole floats to sink the line out of the wind and stop it pulling the float out of position, which is exactly what you are trying to achieve with a fly.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Not sure about that, makes sense if its a wet compound when fishing, like washing up liquid, but the anti-fog is meant to be applied then allowed to dry. Its fairly resistant to me cleaning the car windows so it must have a decent lifespan. I also keep thinking about using it to coat a batch of wet flies and nymphs (the unweighted ones that always seem to float for a bit such as unweighted hares ear nymphs etc)

Steve
If the anti-fog is resistant to water (?) then can it be truly hydrophilic? But if it is water-resistant but also 'wetting' then it sounds like it is worth a try. Give it a go - nothing to lose, eh?...

Col
 
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tangled

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I've always meant to try anti-fog spray for car windows - From my reckoning it must be hydrophilic so should work
Been there, done that, doesn't work. Soz.

I now think that the only thing that works is detergent because it lowers the surface tension immediately around the line allowing it to get through it.
 

speytime

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I tried plant wetting agent on a new line Saturday past, the 10ft intermediate section wasn't getting through the surface tension as quickly as I liked.
So, I put a spot on wetting agent on my fingers and pulled the tip section through it, when I cast it back out it went through the tension right away, when I recast it, it didn't go through as readily.

Al
 

themind

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If the anti-fog is resistant to water (?) then can it be truly hydrophilic? But if it is water-resistant but also 'wetting' then it sounds like it is worth a try. Give it a go - nothing to lose, eh?...

Col
You can Create a surface structure which reduces the effect of surface tension, such as on self cleaning glass or anti fog coatings on glasses. I'm speculating here but if the anti fog was dissolved in something that evaporated quickly it could leave a surface structure that makes the water more resistant to beading so reducing the effect of surface tension.

Steve
 

kingf000

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You can Create a surface structure which reduces the effect of surface tension, such as on self cleaning glass or anti fog coatings on glasses. I'm speculating here but if the anti fog was dissolved in something that evaporated quickly it could leave a surface structure that makes the water more resistant to beading so reducing the effect of surface tension.

Steve
Rain X anti fog contains polydimethylsiloxanes (silicone oil, plus alcohols that evaporate quickly. So it forms a silicone layer on the glass which is hydrophobic.
 

themind

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Rain X anti fog contains polydimethylsiloxanes (silicone oil, plus alcohols that evaporate quickly. So it forms a silicone layer on the glass which is hydrophobic.
Whats your source for this? The data sheets for the anti-fog don't mention it and I'm not sure how any anti-fog would work by using polydimethylsiloxanes. Rain repellent on the other hand (for the use on the outside of the windscreen) it makes perfect sense.

Steve
 

kingf000

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Whats your source for this? The data sheets for the anti-fog don't mention it and I'm not sure how any anti-fog would work by using polydimethylsiloxanes. Rain repellent on the other hand (for the use on the outside of the windscreen) it makes perfect sense.

Steve
Apologies, I searched rainX antifog on Google and it came up with the wrong one! The safety datasheet shows it contains dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether. It is a liquid and totally miscible with water, so would dissolve instantaneously if spread on the line. https://www.rainx.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Rain-X-Anti-Fog.pdf
 

themind

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kingf000

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Yes, thats the data sheet I found.

Steve
If the rain repellent contains polydimethylsiloxanes, would it be good as a floatant for dry flies? Strange, the safety datasheet for that I found didn't include PDS as an ingredient, but it does contain something that forms a hydrophobic layer on the glass. Years ago I made some floatant from silicone grease and toluene. It worked brillianlty but it went gunky due to the silica in the grease. So I've ordered some silicone oil and I'll try it again. Simply dip the fly into the liquid, blow on it and a couple of false casts and its ready to float! However, I've got some rain X rain repellent so I'll give that a go!
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Years ago I made some floatant from silicone grease and toluene.
Not sure I would want to be exposing myself to toluene?

On the subject of floatants, this came at me as a follow-on clip on YouTube and looked quite interesting...

 

kingf000

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Just found out that mucillin silicone hourglass is silicone oil! I think diluting it would make it better, possibly with IPA.
 

kingf000

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Not sure I would want to be exposing myself to toluene?

On the subject of floatants, this came at me as a follow-on clip on YouTube and looked quite interesting...

Toluene is fine if you don't squirt it up your nose or drink it. Someone previously mentioned becoming 'drunk' with fumes from a leaking bottle in the car, but a broken bottle of whisky would have had the same effect in an enclosed space. Been using toluene for 50 years with no ill effects and the safety datasheet says it's OK. That said, if the silicone oil dissolves in isopropyl alcohol, that may be better but, even though it has a lower boiling point, it would probably take longer to dry.
 

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