Small stream rod

tommysis

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My first post, and it's a big one - for me at least. I want to buy a new rod for fishing small streams. I've only been fishing for 6 months and already I've found I'm enjoying the kind of small, wild streams you can find in the West Country Angling Passport more than fisheries (I can't afford bigger rivers!). Currently I have a 9 ft #5, Orvis Clearwater, which I use for everything.

So, I am thinking 6 or 7 ft, probably a #3. And I have narrowed things down to a Greys GR70 Stream-flex, 6.7 or 7ft; a Clearwater #3 at 7.6 (but on some days I wonder about the 6.6 #2 - probably too lightweight); or maybe even the Hardy Sirrus Glass #3, which comes in a 6 or 7ft version.

What do you all think? I want a short rod as these streams have so much overhanging trees. But is 6ft too short? And is the slower action of the glass rod too hard for a newbie like me? I like the slower Clearwater (I also have an 8 weight for saltwater, and I find that less fun), and hear that glass rods 'self load' to help with limited casting space, and a shorter rod length.

Thoughts?
 

Mr Notherone

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I also enjoy small stream fishing and am very happy with my XF2 Streamflex, which preceded the GR70. I fish more expensive river rods, but I'm always happy to pick up the Streamflex. It's a 7ft 3wt and is a good quality rod for the money. I wouldn't overly worry about a softer rod as you want something that will load with little line out and roll casts well. I match mine with a Barrio smallstream line and it suits me fine. By the way, welcome, you'll find lots of willing advice on here. Good luck.
 

tompy

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I use a 6ft #3 Shakespeare Agility Rise on small streams (and bigger sometimes) - it's a great rod, and dead cheap compared to the competition.
 

pusser

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For quite a lot of the Westcountry Angling Passport beats you will get away with an 8'6" #4 rod (I know this as I fish them a lot with that length of rod).

If you really do want a small rod then the Shaky Agility Rise 6' #3 is a lovely little rod, although you may find it hard to get one now (not sure if there is a short/light rod in the new range).

Good luck
 

airebugwafter

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beowulf

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I fish those exact same waters and if I had to pick one rod to cover most situations it would be a 7'6" 3wt.
I have 6' 2 and 3wts but the shorter lengths can be restrictive on the more open sections, although I like them on the real 'brushy' streams.
I have 8'6" rods in 4wt but find they can be overgunned and find the line size to much for many situations.

Currently use a Wychwood River & Stream 3wt but that's personal preference.

Glass is lovely to cast and fish with, not difficult when you work out to just slow down. Look at the Echo rods available from Barbless Flies.
 

luke troutstalker

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I fish those exact same waters and if I had to pick one rod to cover most situations it would be a 7'6" 3wt.
I have 6' 2 and 3wts but the shorter lengths can be restrictive on the more open sections, although I like them on the real 'brushy' streams.
I have 8'6" rods in 4wt but find they can be overgunned and find the line size to much for many situations.

Currently use a Wychwood River & Stream 3wt but that's personal preference.

Glass is lovely to cast and fish with, not difficult when you work out to just slow down. Look at the Echo rods available from Barbless Flies.


Also have experience on these passport streams, and a 7'6" # 3 would also be my choice.
Line wise, I'd choose a #4 in most normal lines, or if it's a barrio small stream stick with a #3. The barrio would be my first choice as the taper lends itself to roll casts.
Get yourself a furled leader.
Don't bother with a DT line unless you intend to chop it in half.
 

Mostyn

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I use 6ft, 6ft.6. and 7ft, for stream fishing, will be selling some (all) my steam fishing gear soon.
 

tommysis

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Thanks guys. I didn't know about barrio lines but I will definitely try them. I think on the basis of these replies I am gonna head for a 7 ft, #3. Just need to decide glass or not. Leaning towards glass, for the fun. I'm also intrigued by the wychwood river and stream but it seems to be out of stock.

Sorry to hear you are selling up the small stuff Mostyn. Just big fish for you these days?! :)

---------- Post added at 10:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:21 PM ----------

Btw Mrnotherone: how soft does he streamflex feel compared to a glass rod? Or the Clearwater?
 

luke troutstalker

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Glass is an acquired taste, not something I favour. I just find in tight quarters they don't have enough oomph to generate the line speed and tighter loops required for some of the voodoo casts you'll find yourself doing - they are quite nice in open areas I have found though. My advice would be to stick with carbon until you are more familiar with the constraints of smaller rivers.
For my money, glass is like owning a classic car, there are no practical advantages, other than they are nice to look at, and you can enjoy the quirks and nuances of driving and owning them.
 

canefly

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I fish a lot of rivers and streams in the West country including passport beats.
I would say a 7ft 3 weight would be ideal for most.
Sure in tighter places a 6 footer would be handy, but you can always roll cast etc:)
 

Mr Notherone

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Btw Mrnotherone: how soft does he streamflex feel compared to a glass rod? Or the Clearwater?

Cant help you with that. I've never cast a Clearwater and haven't used a glass rod since my course fishing days. All I can tell you is that my Streamflex does what I need. I wouldn't call it a particularly slow rod as it recovers quickly. It has a nice through action and loads a short line easily. I also like the feel of the handle and it balances nicely with a click & pawl battenkill reel. A lot of this stuff is subjective and you have to find what's comfortable for you.
 

tommysis

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Do you guys reckon a #2 is too light? What's the advantages and disadvantages of a really light line? I ask as there is a 6ft %2 in the Clearwater line.
 

luke troutstalker

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Glass, 2 weights, it's not specialist stuff, but it's not fresh to a river stuff.
Small stream, 3 weight rod , 3/4 weight line is the common theme to the advice, you generally don't get bum advice on here.
 

redietz

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Glass is an acquired taste, not something I favour.

Having come up on glass in the 60's, I'd say just the opposite; carbon is the acquired taste. It's got it's place for longer and heavier weight rods, but for small stream fishing it just takes too much thought to cast. Glass is much more forgiving and I don't have to think about the mechanics. The fly goes where I want it to without any thought process involved.

I do a lot of small stream fishing, and prefer a 7 or 7 1/2 foot rod (shorter is too hard to roll cast) of either glass in a 3 or 4 weight or cane in a 4 or 5 weight. I can't stand carbon in these lengths/line weights.

To each his own, I guess. It's what you're used to.
 

ACW

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Just to add a different take on this ,i use a 6.6 agutters cane for my sadly these days rare small stream fishing ,it does a goood job for me matched with a thebault silk line and 3 foot of furle (dibble,mr trout can suppy).
Not a premium rod by any means ,but if it dies I will miss it .

just to add a minor historical note ,the rod was bought through the forum ,i out bid the much missed cothi for it ,i beleive ho still holds a grudge!
 
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young jon

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Glass and bamboo for me, I find it easier to cast because carbon is too stiff in short lengths. Glass and bamboo are also stronger than carbon, so stand up better to the battering off tree branches that comes with this sort of fishing. I use the #2 lines when the water gets skinny, otherwise the Barrio smallstream is my go to line.
 

Wee Jimmy

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Got chatting to a local angler fishing the Willowemoc (beaverkill trib) last week while on holiday there. He let me have a few casts with his old fibreglass 8 footer which he had made himself back in the 70s on a Fenwick blank. Ive never used fibreglass for donkeys years and expected it would feel like a piece of **** to be honest but I was surprised at how light and well balanced it was.
 

neroda

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I have a couple of Hardy glass rods for small river fishing and would choose them over a carbon rod every time. Whilst down to personal choice, in my view the slower action and easy loading qualities of glass rods would perhaps suit the less experienced river angler. Like I said though, it is a matter of personal choice.
 

pusser

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Going on from my previous post ...

I also have a 7' #4 cane rod, which is fantastic to use (and suits the WAP beats well).
 

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