Split-Cane rods;

easker1

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remember Nickel silver is Neither Nickel or silver, its a form of white Brass, I have used it for making ferrules for Bagpipes, rolled and Hard soldered, easker1
 

kevin55

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Dec 14, 2010
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London NW; originally from South Derbyshire
Very nice, any pics?
These days I have all splice joints (except the Marshall 206), but some of those ferrules are really pretty.

I can't get the photos off my old iphone Steve as it won't allow me to mail now

On big rods I remember using a 12 or 13' salmon rod in Sweden (the guide's rod) many years ago with a shooting head and it didn't feel pleasant, not like flicking out a dry. The rod had no ferrules but the joints mated up at 45% and there was tape or cloth wrapping to keep them together
Though north of the arctic circle the midges were close to unbearable
 

stevel

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I can't get the photos off my old iphone Steve as it won't allow me to mail now

On big rods I remember using a 12 or 13' salmon rod in Sweden (the guide's rod) many years ago with a shooting head and it didn't feel pleasant, not like flicking out a dry. The rod had no ferrules but the joints mated up at 45% and there was tape or cloth wrapping to keep them together
Though north of the arctic circle the midges were close to unbearable
No worries Kevin, the pics on Gary's site are pretty good and I could probably work out who/which it is from them!

Regarding the long rods, you were probably using a Sharpes Scottie or other, or even older. They are heavy beasts and very slow.

The new wave bamboo speys by Brandin, Clay, Reid are a different kettle of fish, and are light(ish) around 12oz, hollowed and fast recovering (either tip oriented Scandi or more regressed tapers).
They mostly use splice joints (quite long for the butt sections at around 8"-9" and shorter for the tip sections) and clear hockey tape to bind them together. After a while you get use to it and can tape them up pretty quickly. The only downside is transporting them from beat to beat, but a good pair of rod racks like Samurais are a godsend.
Definitely not a delicate dry fly with these, however I do have a smaller 11'3 #6 which is for smaller fish and possibly skating a dry and it is much more delicate. They can blast out a line 80'-100' with high line speed and tight loops when the timing goes right.

Cheers,
Steve

Below is the butt splice for a 12'3 7/8 and about 8". The oak splice protectors were made by the maker as an optional accessory, but people normally use clear plastic tubing - not as pretty though!

15921351487301168572759195262529.jpg
 
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kevin55

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Dec 14, 2010
Messages
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Location
London NW; originally from South Derbyshire
No worries Kevin, the pics on Gary's site are pretty good and I could probably work out who/which it is from them!

Regarding the long rods, you were probably using a Sharpes Scottie or other, or even older. They are heavy beasts and very slow.

The new wave bamboo speys by Brandin, Clay, Reid are a different kettle of fish, and are light(ish) around 12oz, hollowed and fast recovering (either tip oriented Scandi or more regressed tapers).
They mostly use splice joints (quite long for the butt sections at around 8"-9" and shorter for the tip sections) and clear hockey tape to bind them together. After a while you get use to it and can tape them up pretty quickly. The only downside is transporting them from beat to beat, but a good pair of rod racks like Samurais are a godsend.
Definitely not a delicate dry fly with these, however I do have a smaller 11'3 #6 which is for smaller fish and possibly skating a dry and it is much more delicate. They can blast out a line 80'-100' with high line speed and tight loops when the timing goes right.

Cheers,
Steve

Below is the butt splice for a 12'3 7/8 and about 8". The oak splice protectors were made by the maker as an optional accessory, but people normally use clear plastic tubing - not as pretty though!

View attachment 27652

Freed up some phone space and managed to get a photo off the memoryPHOTO-2020-06-14-19-50-50.jpg
 

Uncas

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That's a nice catch of fish, The top picture is that a Hardy and Duchess.
What is the rod in the bottom picture Nymphist
 

stevel

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Thanks, not a duchess but a golden prince. The rod from the bottom photo is a Tim Harris rod he made for me some +10 years ago.
Very nice rod, and Tim is a great chap and maker.
10 years ago he made me a rod for my daughter who was my little fishing buddy at 6 years old.
It was a Nunley 5'6" #4 Mountain Creek taper and it was beautifully finished. My daughter caught lots of nice 5lb mayfly trout from my club chalkstream waters and grayling on the famous Wilton club on the Wylye.
Whilst she has gone onto other interests now, she can't bear for me to move it on, as it's so special. :love:
 

Uncas

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Yorkshire
Thanks, not a duchess but a golden prince. The rod from the bottom photo is a Tim Harris rod he made for me some +10 years ago.
What is the length of both rods and line weight, it's always interesting to see what other members use.
 

nymphist

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Sofia,Bulgaria
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What is the length of both rods and line weight, it's always interesting to see what other members use.
Both rods are 8'6". I sold all my 7'and 8' fly rods many moons ago so the shortest i have is 8'6. The hardy rod is not # marked as in 1960 they don't have aftma. Later models are marked as #5 and i would say its ok. The Harris rod is marked as #4/5 and is ok too. I don't consider too much the casting # weight, normally my first consideration for choosing a fly rod is what type of fish i will be after, the fish size. The Harris rod was made with a particular small river in mind with very few bigger fish. The hardy rod is more of a do it all trout rod.
 
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