Split-Cane rods;

Uncas

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I am familiar with silk lines and their ability to cut through the wind, but I've never thought they enable you to use a lighter line for any given rod; a five weight is (or ought to be) the same weight whether silk or plastic. Like you, most of my fishing is done inside 15 yards - in fact most of the time it is inside ten, including the combined length of the rod and leader, so I often only have five yards or so of fly line beyond the rod tip. If necessary I'll go up a line weight rather than down, to load the rod sooner.

Evidently from the photo the line works for you, which probably just means you're a better caster than I am. I must admit I struggle with light lines, even on rods well-suited to them.
Look at ( Rush river website ) 406 lines for cane & glass fly rods.
 

lhomme

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Weird question, maybe another one might answer it. Would cane rod users never have caught fish over 2lb before glass and carbon came on the market? I've landed many trout well in excess of that figure on cane and I'm sure many others did.
I'm sorry, my post wasn't meant to be rude or offensive, I just wondered about the question. Cane rods are perfectly capable of doing what modern rods do. This is a picture of a "smaller" fish caught on a 7' #4 at long range. If you look closely, you'll see the amount of line I handed in.

bamboo fight.jpg
foto's Monique 069.jpg
 

airsprite

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A use so rare you might consider selling it, only to regret it later?
Most 6' 6", 7' rods seem to be 4-5 so I'd love a 3 wt
Yes i agree, most rods i own are 4/5 weights too, a good cane 3 weight is hard to find.
So sorry, this one is definitely going to be a keeper.
You could try building one from a blank. I can recommend Chapmans blanks having built a nice 6ft 6in rod a few years ago.
A nice project to have through the winter months.

Steve
 

stevel

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Wow I just stumbled upon this forum again having not been on for absolute years.
I had just started my bamboo obsession, with Gary Marshall's rods, having had some very bad experiences with some pretty well known international builders noted for their bamboo ferrules, one leaving me with a large hole in my pocket.
Gary restored that faith, but I then discovered the works of James Reid, a builder from North Vancouver who made his name in some pretty beautiful and high functioning double handed bamboo spey rods which are hollowed and splice jointed. We developed a great friendship and over the last 8 years, I accumulated a stable of Reid bamboos in both double handed salmon/steelhead rods to 12'3 and also some trout and seatrout rods at around 8'5 to 8'9 in 4/5 to 8 in single handed.
Except for the very long 15' rods which are still graphite by B&W, I fish exclusively bamboo, and those of James Reid. I do still have one of the Marshalls, and 1 gift from a friend from Slovenia of an 11' switch rod from a builder from his native land (Radivoj Savli).
Whilst slightly heavier than a graphite rod (I was a Winston nut for many years but finally unloaded the entire collection to friends on here to fund my bamboo obsession) in the lengths I fish, they are completely fine for trips up to 3 days fishing sometimes 12 hours per day. James' tapers are no sloppy classic tapers, allowing you to cast far and cast weight, and the double handers able to cast large distances up to 100' with short shooting head spey lines and best atlantic salmon to 22lb.
Whilst I never would have said this in my Winston heyday, I don't miss those green sticks one bit!
 

airsprite

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Wow I just stumbled upon this forum again having not been on for absolute years.
I had just started my bamboo obsession, with Gary Marshall's rods, having had some very bad experiences with some pretty well known international builders noted for their bamboo ferrules, one leaving me with a large hole in my pocket.
Gary restored that faith, but I then discovered the works of James Reid, a builder from North Vancouver who made his name in some pretty beautiful and high functioning double handed bamboo spey rods which are hollowed and splice jointed. We developed a great friendship and over the last 8 years, I accumulated a stable of Reid bamboos in both double handed salmon/steelhead rods to 12'3 and also some trout and seatrout rods at around 8'5 to 8'9 in 4/5 to 8 in single handed.
Except for the very long 15' rods which are still graphite by B&W, I fish exclusively bamboo, and those of James Reid. I do still have one of the Marshalls, and 1 gift from a friend from Slovenia of an 11' switch rod from a builder from his native land (Radivoj Savli).
Whilst slightly heavier than a graphite rod (I was a Winston nut for many years but finally unloaded the entire collection to friends on here to fund my bamboo obsession) in the lengths I fish, they are completely fine for trips up to 3 days fishing sometimes 12 hours per day. James' tapers are no sloppy classic tapers, allowing you to cast far and cast weight, and the double handers able to cast large distances up to 100' with short shooting head spey lines and best atlantic salmon to 22lb.
Whilst I never would have said this in my Winston heyday, I don't miss those green sticks one bit!
Welcome back to the forum.
It seems there is a fair amount of interest out there in Split Cane rods, hopefully we can keep this thread alive for some time.
I have never tried a double handed Cane rod yet, but with the smooth power that the material has, i would imagine a good one would be great.
Of course they would look great too.
It would be interesting for you to post some photos of your rods.

Steve
 

Vermontdrifter

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I'm sorry, my post wasn't meant to be rude or offensive, I just wondered about the question. Cane rods are perfectly capable of doing what modern rods do. This is a picture of a "smaller" fish caught on a 7' #4 at long range. If you look closely, you'll see the amount of line I handed in.

View attachment 27253
View attachment 27254
I remember that rod! And I remember you using it at that very spot to cast a Lightly weighted nymph 15 to 20 meters into a raging headwind and catching multiple fish some of which made that one look small!

Terry
 

lhomme

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I remember that rod! And I remember you using it at that very spot to cast a Lightly weighted nymph 15 to 20 meters into a raging headwind and catching multiple fish some of which made that one look small!

Terry
When I looked at the date on those pictures I couldn't believe they were taken 14 years ago, Terry, that day with you and Hans there still remains vivid in my memory as a very enjoyable one thanks to your company. :cool:
 

stevel

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Welcome back to the forum.
It seems there is a fair amount of interest out there in Split Cane rods, hopefully we can keep this thread alive for some time.
I have never tried a double handed Cane rod yet, but with the smooth power that the material has, i would imagine a good one would be great.
Of course they would look great too.
It would be interesting for you to post some photos of your rods.

Steve
Hi Steve,
I'll dig up some shots of some of the double handers. James always sent shots as the builds progressed. For sure they are real head turners but they are also amazing casting and fishing tools as well, especially from a BC heritage. As they are hollow and splice jointed, there's no flat spot as with most metal ferruled cane rods and weight is manageable - 12oz for a 12'.
Cheers,
SDSC_0626.JPG
 

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Vermontdrifter

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When I looked at the date on those pictures I couldn't believe they were taken 14 years ago, Terry, that day with you and Hans there still remains vivid in my memory as a very enjoyable one thanks to your company. :cool:
You should come down for old times’ sake some time. Hans and I still meet up at Sommedieue a few times per year and actually spent a week on Islay last September which you would have enjoyed. Fishing was hard that late in the year but the local fire water was excellent, the Lochs magnificent, and we set the world to rights every evening over a few drams. Hans even became a seal whisperer while sea trout fishing, well it was more like cursing but that doesn’t sound as nice and we discovered why you should never wear an automatic life vest while wading!
 

stevel

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Would a cane rod be suitable for 2lb trout from a small stillwater ?
Very much so, especially since you don't have to cast to the horizon, however even in those large reservoirs, there are lots of fish to be picked up in the margins. Bamboo is probably more resilient that graphite, especially the solid ones so you don't have to worry too much about them breaking when you step on them. You do have to be concerned about how you land fish however, and you can't put sharp angles as you often do with graphite when landing it with a net. I changed the way I land fish by hand lining the fish in once it gets close by casting a loop behind me and grabbing the line with my other hand.
On the first trip to my local Lea chalkstream with my new my JMR 8'5 4/5 rod, I landed 4 trout to 4/5 lb and it did that job easily ; my daughter's 5'6" #4 Tim Harris rod also landed many Mayfly rainbows to over 5lb on the same stretch of river.
 

kevin55

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Very much so, especially since you don't have to cast to the horizon, however even in those large reservoirs, there are lots of fish to be picked up in the margins. Bamboo is probably more resilient that graphite, especially the solid ones so you don't have to worry too much about them breaking when you step on them. You do have to be concerned about how you land fish however, and you can't put sharp angles as you often do with graphite when landing it with a net. I changed the way I land fish by hand lining the fish in once it gets close by casting a loop behind me and grabbing the line with my other hand.
On the first trip to my local Lea chalkstream with my new my JMR 8'5 4/5 rod, I landed 4 trout to 4/5 lb and it did that job easily ; my daughter's 5'6" #4 Tim Harris rod also landed many Mayfly rainbows to over 5lb on the same stretch of river.

Ooh, what fish, where's this stretch of the Lea if I may ask?

A club member I know uses a Gary Marshall 8 wt for carp and always keeps the landing net handle fully extended to keep the bend in the rod shallow
 

stevel

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Ooh, what fish, where's this stretch of the Lea if I may ask?

A club member I know uses a Gary Marshall 8 wt for carp and always keeps the landing net handle fully extended to keep the bend in the rod shallow
It's the Amwell Magna club in Hertfordshire. It's stocked, but there's a nice head of wild fish as well.
The flow's really improved (well not last year but every river was well down due to the hot dry summer).
Yes if you have a really long handled net or someone to help you land, then that's great as well, otherwise you could break a tip without knowing or seeing the angle.
As I said, I hand line in the fish now, just pull off a large couple of loops from the reel with your reel hand, cast the rod as in a backcast and grab the line as it nears your face. Then handline in the fish!
 

airsprite

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Hi Steve,
I'll dig up some shots of some of the double handers. James always sent shots as the builds progressed. For sure they are real head turners but they are also amazing casting and fishing tools as well, especially from a BC heritage. As they are hollow and splice jointed, there's no flat spot as with most metal ferruled cane rods and weight is manageable - 12oz for a 12'.
Cheers,
SView attachment 27273
Thanks for posting the photos.
I really like the silk colours on the rod in the main picture.
The only spliced rods i see on Ebay fairly often are Sharpes of Aberdeen, have you ever cast one.
I would imagine them to be pretty heavy.

Steve
 

stevel

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Thanks for posting the photos.
I really like the silk colours on the rod in the main picture.
The only spliced rods i see on Ebay fairly often are Sharpes of Aberdeen, have you ever cast one.
I would imagine them to be pretty heavy.

Steve
Yes James likes really contemporary wrap colours with a lot of "pop". So much these days makers just go for very safe colours, a non-colour preserved thread making it translucent with an epoxy on top to make it all shiny and pretty.
That particular rod had a colour preserved copper tipped in a deep purple, really striking. The cane was darkly flamed but also with a bit of variegation so that the flaming is not a consistent colour all the way through. Striking.
The Sharpes are apparently good rods but as you say, heavy and slow. There are quite a few Americans making spliced spey rods now, some very expensive like Bob Clay and Per Brandin. Many of these makers, including James Reid have multi-year waits for one of their rods. There is a light year of difference between the actions of the old spey rods and those of today. They are semi hollowed and have actions from tip oriented Scandi to regressive (parabolic) for Skagit and also progressive. They are quick recovering and can cast heavy tips like T14 and big intruder type flies as well as the traditional atlantic salmon flies with aplomb.
They are best in lengths at 12' and under and with shorter Skagit/Scandi or short spey lines though some tapers can cut the longer heads up to 65'.
I remember one trip to Northern Ireland on the Morne and firing out long casts with tight loops. My friend was on a bridge watching with a local who asked "what rod is that, a Loop?". My friend replied "bamboo" to which the astounded local replied that he couldn't believe bamboo could cast like that.
 
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stevel

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Just seen an article about fishing for Tiger-fish in the Zambezi with a J. M. Reid split-cane rod 8'9'' 9wt catching 5kg Tigers, and why not they are quit capable really interesting.
Cane-rod tapers I have always liked tapers by Dickerson 7612/7613/8013/8014 and Payne 101/102/ and I would just love a Canadian Canoe.
I also like rods by Bob Summers and Mark McKillip.
Just did a google for this and found a post on Clark's (now Classic) Fly Rod forum.
James did a series of saltwater rods and I believe that it's his "Saltwater Special". He also made some double handers for some guys in Hawaii catching bonefish and permit and he went out to fish with them.
He also made a 8'9 #12 Tarpon proto which he offered to send to me when I was going out to Slovenia quite a bit to fish for hucho with my friend Jure (used to be BlueOne on here). He had sent this rod to a saltwater friend and it was certainly up to the job.
The bamboo world is a slippery slope, once it bites you're lost! You're probably only going to get a second hand Summers if you want one! I was friendly with this guy on Clark's who'd been waiting 9 years for a pair of Summers and Brandin rods! :oops:
 

stevel

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Regarding the current batch of fiberglass rods which are experiencing quite a revival with new boutique makers developing faster glass, i had a little taster of this quite a few years back.
I won a day down in Salisbury in the Monnow auctions with Taniwha on the club water with glass rods, of which he was an expert and I believe now runs a company building glass rods.
As a result if that day I was put on a Tom Morgan's wait list for his glass blanks, (not before being "interviewed" by the man himself as to why I wanted one of his blanks, and who was going to do the finishing work) reintroduced after many years. After about 18 months it was finally delivered, and as suggested by Taniwha, sent to Matthew Leiderman who is another glass fanatic in the US with amazing finishing skills. There was also a wait list for completion, as there always is with custom builders of skill.
So after 3 years this was finally complete, was it worth it? It was certainly one of the most beautiful rods of any material I had ever had the pleasure to hold.
On its maiden voyage I took it to Northern Spain where I had an annual trip to fish for salmon, trout and seatrout on the dry. The rivers are wide, fast and there is wind, and in those conditions the rod wasn't up to it.
Perhaps in a chalkstream with dry flies in low wind conditions they would have been fine. I eventually sold it on, but the creations of the modern glass makers are amazing. I cast one Ijuin at the Alternative stand at the London Fly show, and met the man himself, and it was very nice, and very pretty!
 
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sofasurfer

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What is the point of making a fast fibreglass rod? You might as well buy carbon fibre. Glass rods are floppy and slow, that is why they became redundant.
 

nymphist

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Glass is becoming pretier in the recent years, but not sure that it will ever look & feel better than bamboo or be more efficient than carbon.
 

stevel

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What is the point of making a fast fibreglass rod? You might as well buy carbon fibre. Glass rods are floppy and slow, that is why they became redundant.
Nothing to do with fast, I have rods in bamboo which are not "fast" yet can cast 100', tight loops and land big fish. When I had my Winstons they were all medium actioned rods, even the saltwater ones.
The TM glass just had no guts and was unusable in all but perfect conditions.
Epic S-Glass is one that is powerful, yet still retains the feel and castability of old glass.
As with all things, R&D changes and improves
 

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