Sport or hobby?

Vintage Badger

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Surely in shooting the most important thing is being able to hit the target? If you can't hit a cow's arse with a banjo, no amount of flushing, pointing and retrieving by pedigree gundogs is going to make any difference? :unsure:
If they come over thick enough and you put up enough flack then eventually you'll hit something, or the person on the next peg will and you can claim it! What Whatt... good show! ;)
 

Cap'n Fishy

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If they come over thick enough and you put up enough flack then eventually you'll hit something, or the person on the next peg will and you can claim it! What Whatt... good show! ;)

I guess it depends on the level of intensity and how much money is involved. The guys I photograph are on a rough shoot that has 300 birds to last them the whole winter. Half a dozen guns, couple of dogs. No pegs - stand where you think you have a chance if a bird comes over...

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Thirty birds in a day is a decent tally. If you can shoot nane, your dog is going to have a quiet day... :whistle:
 

anzac

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My granddad was a dairy farmer. I was 11 YO when he took me along he and his dog Terry stalked pheasant in a sizeable, overgrown, disused paddock. I reckon the pheasant was planned for our dinner, but Terry went on point 3 or 4 times, but Granddad never got a shot. Solo hunting line that can be challenging.
 

Wee Jimmy

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Judging by the number of them that try their hardest to get me to run them over ,I reckon pheasants are either the dumbest birds going or a bunch of suicide jockeys. I could have killed hunners of them if I wanted to.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Judging by the number of them that try their hardest to get me to run them over ,I reckon pheasants are either the dumbest birds going or a bunch of suicide jockeys. I could have killed hunners of them if I wanted to.

Ha-ha - aye, I've hit one or two over the years with the car. They are not the sharpest of creatures...

ArthursSeat01Dec20_5605.jpg


Stockie-bashing, so it is... 😜
 

Noodles

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Fishing is a multitude of things for me, peace and relaxation, time with friends and quite literally my live and livelihood.
 

BobP

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We hear it all the time on driven shoots. We call it "desperation" shots. We hear "bang, bang" in rapid succession. The guy knows he is going to miss so pulls the second barrel in the vague hope that something will hit. It seldom does.

The chap who knows what he is doing may miss with the first shot, but has the time to increase his lead and take a measured second shot. This one usually kills.
 

taffy1

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The "stockie-bashing" analogy would describe the pheasant shoots as such, seeing as pheasants are an introduced species, foxhunting however, still depends on the capabilities of a dog raising the prey. Pheasants are like sheep, always looking for an alternative way to die.
 

BobP

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The "stockie-bashing" analogy would describe the pheasant shoots as such, seeing as pheasants are an introduced species, foxhunting however, still depends on the capabilities of a dog raising the prey. Pheasants are like sheep, always looking for an alternative way to die.
Hmmm! 30 dogs to catch one fox, and as often as not they fail. And speaking of "introduced" species just what do you think rainbows are? In fact, pheasants have been here a lot longer than rainbows having been brought over, along with rabbits, by the Romans.
 

anzac

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Hmmm! ... In fact, pheasants have been here a lot longer than rainbows having been brought over, along with rabbits, by the Romans.
Well, that explains why I thought pheasants and rabbits were native to Britain.
 

anzac

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They come costly when they hit the plastic grill :cry:
I hit a quail that flew across -- well, most of the way across -- the road with the Opal Kadett I had back in the early 1970s. It cracked the not cheap (£££) to replace windscreen.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The "stockie-bashing" analogy would describe the pheasant shoots as such, seeing as pheasants are an introduced species, foxhunting however, still depends on the capabilities of a dog raising the prey. Pheasants are like sheep, always looking for an alternative way to die.

It's stockie-bashing not because they are an introduced species (though they are). It's stockie-bashing because, like rainbows, they are reared by farmers and released into the wild for the purpose of us getting sport from them. Rainbows and pheasants are both "stocked".

Once released, they are just trying to survive, but they are not as naturally wary as wild animals. Add that to them being a bit thick compared to many species, and you get a lot of early casualties, whether it is from cars, guns, foxes, cat's whiskers, FABs, whatever...

You could rear native grey partridge and release them for the purpose of shooting, and plenty places rear native brown trout and release them for the purpose of angling. Both would be 'stockies', in the same way the pheasants and rainbows are 'stockies'.
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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A whole deer can fit through one half of a BMW grille...

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This was a strange one...

One of our guys went over a hare on the way to Coldingham. It somehow got bounced up and stuck behind the grille. It was still alive when he reached the loch. It took some effort to extract it.

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BobP

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Well, that explains why I thought pheasants and rabbits were native to Britain.
I'd say that the better part of 2000 years qualifies as native. Less than 200 for rainbows.

Carp, of course, came over with the monks after 1066. We were a Catholic country then and it was fish on Friday or starve!
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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I'd say that the better part of 2000 years qualifies as native.

No it doesn't. Ring-necked pheasant simply is not native to Britain. It is native to Asia and parts of Europe like the northern foothills of the Caucasus and the Balkans. It was introduced to and has become naturalised in Britain.
 

Vintage Badger

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The Romans also introduced the brown hare into Britain, our native hare is the mountain hare.

Not a lot of people know that... or probably want to! :giggle:

Carp, of course, came over with the monks after 1066. We were a Catholic country then and it was fish on Friday or starve!
Apparently they could eat beavers on a Friday too (no rude comments from the cheap seats please); owing to the fact the beaver has a scaly tail they got the Pope to agree that it could be classified as a fish!
 
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