Starting out

Itsmrb

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Apr 17, 2020
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25
Hi all

After many years coarse fishing on and off, I've recently decided to move on to fly fishing. I live in Central Scotland and have plenty of venue options although I'd also like to try river fishing as well. Once the lockdown is lifted I have arranged to meet up with a fly fishing tutor for a half day's casting lesson and I might also try a guided trip. Anyway I've begun to look at equipment and there is certainly no shortage of options out there! One rod and reel combo I've been looking at is the 9ft Orvis encounter at around £180. Is Orvis a well respected brand in the fly world? Are they considered budget or mid range? Basically my budget for a rod and reel in £200. What other gear will I need to get started as well and which brands should I steer clear of?

Many thanks
 

scottratt

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Oct 9, 2011
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392
It will depend on whether you want to fish rivers or still waters.
this is a great deal from Norris For small to medium rivers. Guideline is a good make in my opinion.

 

fishing hobo

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I would at least stretch out to the clearwater outfit, I can't remeber if you get 10% off first purchase when you subscribe to their newsletter
 

wobbly face

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Not So Greater Manchester.
9ft #5 weight is considered best all rounder, medium size rivers to small stillwaters.
Unfortunately, it doesn't stop at rod and reel.
As for brands, Orvis have a good warranty and after sales. John Norris are a reputable dealer. GAC also have some good deals on.
 

Itsmrb

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Thanks. So on top of the rod, reel, line, flys and tackle box, what else would you advise?
 

wobbly face

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Not So Greater Manchester.
Landing net, now it depends on weather you're fishing river or stillwater.
Waders, many out there and they can all leak.
Forceps/hemostats for removing awkward flies, line snips/scissors, leaders and tippet, floatant, sinkant.
 

fishing hobo

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Wader and wading boots if you go to the river and a net. Make sure you have a cap and sun glasses (eye protection).
 

Itsmrb

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You will also need a whisky filled flask to alleviate the frustration that comes with this type of fishing!


Douglas
Now your talking! The is my 'other' hobby. About a 1/4 of the way into a bottle of aberlour 12 this evening 👌
 

Itsmrb

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Which are the good brands and which are the ones to avoid when buying gear?
 

noddy299

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Durham
There aren't really brands to avoid in fly fishing. If they are for sale in a retailer in the UK they are generally pretty reputable as if they aren't amy good they just don't survive.

If you are planning on getting lessons then you are off to a good start. These are crucial and will give you a real boost, if you have had a couple of hours of learning you will be ahead of 50% of anglers out there from the start.

Orvis Clearwater kit in a 9' #5. Can't go far wrong with orvis as a brand, good after care, still have physical shops, kit is generally good.

Fly box with flies, keep these simple, you do not need the extra confusion of a thousand flies to look at and learn whilst you are still trying to learn how to get them in the water.

Some kind of bag/vest/pack to keep all your stuff in when on the water again keep this simple and small. If you get a big bag you will fill it with all kinds of nonsense. Wait until you understand what you are doing and then buy the nonsense later.

Line snips, few tapered leaders, priest, forceps. Leeda do vest packs with all the little bits you need and they also sell good leaders, buy a few 9 foot knotless leaders in 6lb.

Hat and sunglasses, and will do but you want a peak and eye protection. Standard doesn't matter and if you look a wally it doesn't matter.

Landing net, I started with a dunlop telescopic landing net for 12 quid from argos and have upgraded multiple times but still go back to it because it just works and if it floats away or snaps in half I dont care.

Then once you have been going a while you can spend millions on stuff you dont need like any other hobby!
 

oscarthecat

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Jun 26, 2014
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312
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Derbyshire - Peak District
It will depend on whether you want to fish rivers or still waters.
this is a great deal from Norris For small to medium rivers. Guideline is a good make in my opinion.

I have a Guideline EX4 8' 6" 4 wt which I bought half price last year. It's an excellent rod, allowing accurate casting and gentle delivery of the fly.
OtC
 

4wings

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Nov 10, 2019
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850
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Bristol
Orvis Encounter, I considered this highly rated entry level rod/outfit but was advised to go for a Clearwater. Some problem with tip section breakage on the Encounter and warranty.
 

noddy299

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Jun 12, 2017
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299
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Durham
If you can afford slightly better, it wont hurt. You will still be useless at first but it means you will be using the rod for longer before you feel the need to upgrade or thats the idea anyways.
 

Itsmrb

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Joined
Apr 17, 2020
Messages
25
There aren't really brands to avoid in fly fishing. If they are for sale in a retailer in the UK they are generally pretty reputable as if they aren't amy good they just don't survive.

If you are planning on getting lessons then you are off to a good start. These are crucial and will give you a real boost, if you have had a couple of hours of learning you will be ahead of 50% of anglers out there from the start.

Orvis Clearwater kit in a 9' #5. Can't go far wrong with orvis as a brand, good after care, still have physical shops, kit is generally good.

Fly box with flies, keep these simple, you do not need the extra confusion of a thousand flies to look at and learn whilst you are still trying to learn how to get them in the water.

Some kind of bag/vest/pack to keep all your stuff in when on the water again keep this simple and small. If you get a big bag you will fill it with all kinds of nonsense. Wait until you understand what you are doing and then buy the nonsense later.

Line snips, few tapered leaders, priest, forceps. Leeda do vest packs with all the little bits you need and they also sell good leaders, buy a few 9 foot knotless leaders in 6lb.

Hat and sunglasses, and will do but you want a peak and eye protection. Standard doesn't matter and if you look a wally it doesn't matter.

Landing net, I started with a dunlop telescopic landing net for 12 quid from argos and have upgraded multiple times but still go back to it because it just works and if it floats away or snaps in half I dont care.

Then once you have been going a while you can spend millions on stuff you dont need like any other hobby!

Great reply, many thanks 👍
 

Itsmrb

Active member
Joined
Apr 17, 2020
Messages
25
Any recommendations for sunglasses? The hat part is taken care of with my harris tweed cap. I take it a waistcoat is still the most popular tackle holding option? If so a recommendation or two would be welcome 👍
 
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