Storm coming/Finicky fish.

Fishtales

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Not pure water - it needs ions in it to conduct. So, salt water is a good conductor. ;)

Col

Don't know about that Col. Visiting the welding shop when I started work was an unpleasant experience when it was raining, it tended to flood, if you forgot and happen to lean on a piece of metal and somebody started welding. You didn't even need to be near the welder :)
 

glueman

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We’re always told and taught that water conducts electricity. In fact, this is the primary reason why water + electricity is such bad news, as it can cause electric shocks to those who come in contact with the dangerous pair.
However, if you really think about it and dig into the depths of chemistry on this question, you’d see that pure water is actually not a good conductor of electricity. In other words, it doesn’t allow an electric current to pass through it.
Water: A universal solvent
Water dissolves a lot of stuff, which is why it is widely known as such a good solvent. In fact, water is often (mistakenly) referred to as the “universal solvent”, because it’s capable of dissolving more substances than any other liquid.
Most water that you encounter in your daily life has some amount of dissolved substances in it. It doesn’t matter whether the water comes from your kitchen faucet, your shower, swimming pool or anywhere else… you can safely assume that it contains a significant amount of dissolved substances, chemicals and minerals.
It’s highly unlikely that the water you have is absolutely pure, i.e., devoid of all salts, minerals and impurities.

Pure water doesn’t conduct electricity
For electricity to travel through a liquid, a movement of charge must occur throughout and across the liquid. Completely deionized water (in other words, absolutely ‘pure’ water) doesn’t have any ions. As a result, there is no flow of charge through water, so pure water doesn’t conduct electricity.
In distilled water, there are no impurities and thus no ions. There are only neutral molecules, and these neutral molecules lack a charge. For that reason, distilled water is also unable to conduct electricity.
Why is normal water a good conductor of electricity?
In tap water, rainwater and seawater, there are countless impurities, such as sodium (Na+), calcium (Ca2+), and magnesium (Mg2+) ions (source). Because these are charged, when they are present in water, electricity is able to flow through the liquid.
Water doesn’t need to have a large amount of impurities to act as a good conductor of electricity; even a small amount of ions can enable a source of water to conduct electric current
 

speytime

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My understanding is its the impurities in water that conducts electricity, pure water doesn't conduct it can be used as an insulatator.

Al
 

Elwyman

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I went sea trout fishing on Sunday night, expecting a storm after 11pm, so I was only planning on a short session.
The Clwyd has been near summer low for weeks, and the fishing has been quite hard at times. I started at 10pm and could see the sheet lightning over the distant hills, quite spectacular as the light and noise were almost constant.....it sounded like someone was beating a big bass drum.
At 11pm I could see the storm getting closer, now creeping up the valley towards me, and I felt the first spot of rain, so I made my way back to the car. I made it just in time as the heavens opened.
From the fishing point of view, it was my busiest session of the season! 3 sea trout landed, all around 1.5lb, and 3 good knocks. The beat is just above the tide, so perhaps it had benefited from a run of fresh fish since my last visit. I do think migratory fish can sense coming rain and will come on the take before the river rises.

The storm had the opposite effect on me yesterday evening when I fished Brenig. There was a decent hatch of Heather fly and I managed 2 fish in the hour before a storm came in. The fish lost interest as the storm came in, and as the wind direction swung through 180 degrees. The rise resumed briefly as the storm passed but petered out as a bank of low cloud or mist swept in and covered the lake.

I drove home through thick fog and as I got down the mountain the sky was a strange yellow colour, a strange mist blanketed the Vale and it seemed to go dark about 45 minutes early. Strange weather!
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Don't know about that Col. Visiting the welding shop when I started work was an unpleasant experience when it was raining, it tended to flood, if you forgot and happen to lean on a piece of metal and somebody started welding. You didn't even need to be near the welder :)
See post #26 Sandy. Pure water does not conduct electricity. The water you refer to would not be pure - it would have ions in it.

Col
 

codyarrow

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. I do think migratory fish can sense coming rain and will come on the take before the river rises.
It is an interesting question. Spoke to a well known scientist on the subject and he explained they (scientists) have no idea as to why a salmon or sea trout runs. Obviously we know when they will but we do not understand the mechanism of how they know.
I obviously offered him the benefit of my vast intellect on the subject to which he replied initially - 'With respect.......' . The translation being 'you are talking sh!t'.:giggle:
 

Cap'n Fishy

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It is an interesting question. Spoke to a well known scientist on the subject and he explained they (scientists) have no idea as to why a salmon or sea trout runs. Obviously we know when they will but we do not understand the mechanism of how they know.
I obviously offered him the benefit of my vast intellect on the subject to which he replied initially - 'With respect.......' . The translation being 'you are talking sh!t'.:giggle:
Is it not more a question of when they are triggered to run, rather than why? My understanding is they are freshwater fish that evolved to bury their eggs in gravel as a survival mechanism. From there, some of them evolved further to use migration to saltwater to enable them to grow to a greater size (better for avoiding predation) and also in bringing biomass back from nutrient-rich oceans to nutrient-poor headwaters (many dying when they get there), so improving the nutrients in the place where their young need it. Having evolved this, instinct is all that is needed - no intelligence or thought process involved.

So, it is a case of triggering when to run... I'm guessing a multi-factor thing... rainfall levels, temperatures, other weather factors, cues from chemical levels in the water, their own hormonal levels associated with the breeding cycle... ???

Col
 

Wee Jimmy

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So, it is a case of triggering when to run... I'm guessing a multi-factor thing... rainfall levels, temperatures, other weather factors, cues from chemical levels in the water, their own hormonal levels associated with the breeding cycle... ???

Col
My guess would be hormonal levels being one of the main factors but that wouldn’t explain why some fish run in spring with spawning still being months away..?
 

Elwyman

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I assume they can smell the change in the water as the river rises, but I haven't asked a fish.
 

codyarrow

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Is it not more a question of when they are triggered to run, rather than why? My understanding is they are freshwater fish that evolved to bury their eggs in gravel as a survival mechanism. From there, some of them evolved further to use migration to saltwater to enable them to grow to a greater size (better for avoiding predation) and also in bringing biomass back from nutrient-rich oceans to nutrient-poor headwaters (many dying when they get there), so improving the nutrients in the place where their young need it. Having evolved this, instinct is all that is needed - no intelligence or thought process involved.

So, it is a case of triggering when to run... I'm guessing a multi-factor thing... rainfall levels, temperatures, other weather factors, cues from chemical levels in the water, their own hormonal levels associated with the breeding cycle... ???

Col
es 'when' me bad nglish :) . Why they are triggered to run when they run. Some good studies in Alaska highlighting the importance of salmon runs transferring energy from sea to land.
 

codyarrow

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My guess would be hormonal levels being one of the main factors but that wouldn’t explain why some fish run in spring with spawning still being months away..?
Evolutionary survival? They do not understand the shift in numbers from winter to summer fish that seems to change either. Another question.
That's me off for a few days, I expect this cracked when I come back!
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Evolutionary survival? They do not understand the shift in numbers from winter to summer fish that seems to change either. Another question.
That's me off for a few days, I expect this cracked when I come back!
If the experts don't understand it, that means we can speculate on it all we like, without fear of being given a "with respect" 😜

OK, how about this theory, what is mein, by Ann Elk...

Spring fish must pack-in feeding early and come back to our shores. Obs they are not going to hang about the estuary, waiting for autumn - far safer to get upriver and wait there. They have plenty fat reserves to see them through till autumn, which they need to do so their eggs/fry have the right temperatures and oxygen levels. And spring river levels are still decent. So, why come back in spring, rather than the autumn? How about if it is tied to food sources at sea? Maybe where spring fish are feeding the food source dries up and the best strategy is simply to head back and wait it out in the rivers???

Or something like that? Dunno. :unsure:
 
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