Streamer fishing for wild brown trout.?

suzzy buzzer

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Streamer fishing for wild brownies has nothing to do with ressies lure pulling.
It does, it’s just the technique and patterns that differ. Large WBT have a taste for mouthfull size offerings of easy food, be it fish, mammals, crustaceans, or amphibians.
Stocked reissie fish have that same instinct, they just don’t have the same extensive menu to choose from.
 

pati

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It does, it’s just the technique and patterns that differ. Large WBT have a taste for mouthfull size offerings of easy food, be it fish, mammals, crustaceans, or amphibians.
Stocked reissie fish have that same instinct, they just don’t have the same extensive menu to choose from.
Well: you can cast a dry anywhere upstream and let it drift downstream, and you can cast a streamer and just pull it... neitherare the best use of the techniques...

The hard part with streamer/lure fishing is consistency and being able to use the technique properly on all types of water.

I m a rather traditional minded fly fisher in the sense that I fish patterns that imitate food for trouts. On some rivers it means size 22caenis, on some it means articulated streamers/lures 3 inches long ... You ll see me happily fish dry flies with a silk line and bamboo rod and 30minutes later use the same rod and line. with an articulated mini sex dungeon (size 2 and size 4 gamakatsu BS10, and yes this is a MINI version of it). I ll admit changing the leader in between the two though!!!

For those who say streamer/lure fishing is easy: practice it a bit and you ll see it s much more complicated to catch fish consistently than with any euro nymphing technique. And to be honest if it was so easy to catch so many big trouts by just chucking a streamer and pulling it back I m convinced there would be many more people using them!
 

boisker

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I randomly googled 'streamer pattern' and 'sea trout fly' is there a difference?

View attachment 29549

View attachment 29550
yes a 100 years of tradition and a bit of tweed;)
one of the clubs I am in... I can fish sub-surface for sea trout with a sea trout ‘fly’ but it’s against the rules to do the same for brown trout with a ‘streamer’....
go figure that😂
 

LukeNZ

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Streamer fishing for wild brown trout? ....I didn’t know there was any other way! 🙃

For those interested, I can offer a book recommendation, and you can buy all the specialist hooks from Partridge, I believe.. If not, have got a good stash too, if you can’t find them.

Tying Heritage Featherwing Streamers by Sharon E. Wright. (available to download on Kindle too).

A fantastic read if you are remotely interested in fly tying. Tie a few too, they catch well.

Cheers and beers,
Luke.
 
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PaulD

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A little of track but I have bought 2 stalking bugs from. Nar less flies are they similar to streamers.. Gary
No, they're very different.

Streamers used in river fishing would most often be tied in the style and manner of Muddlers, Woolly Buggers and Zonkers, commonly with a heavy tungsten bed or a cone head.

A Stalking Bug is more generally a heavy, fast sinking 'nymph like' tying - sometimes the body is just wrapped lead wire - designed to be 'pitched' to observed fish, lying in cover.
 

pati

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No, they're very different.

Streamers used in river fishing would most often be tied in the style and manner of Muddlers, Woolly Buggers and Zonkers, commonly with a heavy tungsten bed or a cone head.

A Stalking Bug is more generally a heavy, fast sinking 'nymph like' tying - sometimes the body is just wrapped lead wire - designed to be 'pitched' to observed fish, lying in cover.
Muddlers, Zonkers, Dog nobblers and woolly bigger are timeless classic “modern” patterns and the basis of any serious box.

That said it is fun also to play with more contemporary modern patterns like: sculpzilla, deceiver and double deceiver, sex dungeon, zoo cougar, Double D (Drunken disorderly), belly scratcher minnow, cheech leech, game changers, headbangers, butt monkey, peanut envy, lap dancer, Barely legal. A couple of good books on streamer fishing: Strip-Set by George Daniel and Modern Streamers for trophy trouts by Kelly Galloup and Bob Linsenman
 

LukeNZ

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Muddlers, Zonkers, Dog nobblers and woolly bigger are timeless classic “modern” patterns and the basis of any serious box.

That said it is fun also to play with more contemporary modern patterns like: sculpzilla, deceiver and double deceiver, sex dungeon, zoo cougar, Double D (Drunken disorderly), belly scratcher minnow, cheech leech, game changers, headbangers, butt monkey, peanut envy, lap dancer, Barely legal. A couple of good books on streamer fishing: Strip-Set by George Daniel and Modern Streamers for trophy trouts by Kelly Galloup and Bob Linsenman
....you missed a lot out 🤣 but have tried and tied most of those, but use mostly - intruders. There are a great many trout spey intruder variations. You could quite feasibly have a box with just intruders in it and be covered for anywhere on the planet for all salmonids, any time of the year, and any water.
 
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pati

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....you missed a lot out 🤣 but I fish with all of those, but mostly with intruders. There are a great many trout spey intruder variations. You could quite feasibly have a box with just intruders and be covered for anywhere on the planet for all salmonids, any time of the year, and any water.
Yep definitely agree with that!
 

SirHarryLewis

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I only tried nymph fishing about ten years ago, prior to that it was dry fly or nothing, saying that there were so many rising fish in the rivers you didn’t need to do any other method.
Im no prude, I’m willing to try most things, I think I was just a bit shocked at first as I’d never seen or know anyone that’s used streamers on the river.
It was a bit of “Londoners coming up here and catching fish with big gaudy things.“
it’s obviously a well used method, and I might have to give it a go?
S.

Also, alot depends on whether they practice catch and release
 

GEK79

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I only tried nymph fishing about ten years ago, prior to that it was dry fly or nothing, saying that there were so many rising fish in the rivers you didn’t need to do any other method.
Im no prude, I’m willing to try most things, I think I was just a bit shocked at first as I’d never seen or know anyone that’s used streamers on the river.
It was a bit of “Londoners coming up here and catching fish with big gaudy things.“
it’s obviously a well used method, and I might have to give it a go?
S.
Without trying to upset anyone of the rivers and we are still here in 100 years then streamer fishing will be classed as traditional.. I too was surprised about Steven saying the fishermen were using streamers on the river.. However they seem to have done the job.. We should all try something new.. If we don't like we won't do it again.. But if we do.. That will be another thread.. I hope Steven if you do give the streamers a try you will let us know how you get on.. I may drop down to the river tonight but she's in full flood..
Stay safe
Gary
 
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ohanzee

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I only ever tried a streamer once, for about 5 mins, found it horrible to cast and not much fun, if I had caught a 6lbder I might have changed that view though.

For me it was much like trying to cast something similar to a feather 4g Toby, same thing to the fish in many ways, and a 4g Toby is a very effective and functionally perfect thing to present with a super light spinning rod, the accuracy and the way you can work it is addictive, as minimal as fly fishing and more effective in a tight tree lined situation.
 

4wings

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Boisker, yes a 100 years of tradition and a bit of tweed
How was the bit of tweed tied?:)
 

Vermontdrifter

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A couple of years ago there was an article in Pêche à la Mouche about the French National team having spent a few days with a streamer specialist to learn the subtleties of the method and get them thinking outside of the box.
 

2306chris

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Without trying to upset anyone of the rivers and we are still here in 100 years then streamer fishing will be classed as traditional.. I too was surprised about Steven saying the fishermen were using streamers on the river.. However they seem to have done the job.. We should all try something new.. If we don't like we won't do it again.. But if we do.. That will be another thread.. I hope Steven if you do give the streamers a try you will let us know how you get on.. I may drop down to the river tonight but she's in full flood..
Stay safe
Gary
Flood!....Just the right time to fish a streamer Gary!...Apparently..
 

three rivers

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I have no problem with targeting large wild browns on streamers, and if I know where one is (and the rules permit) I will happily put up a 0X leader and a size 8 longshank muddler or woolly b*gger, if I can't shift the thing on a similar size dry sedge or moth pattern. I certainly don't consider the method inferior to dry fly, nymph, upstream wet fly or even downstream wet fly. What does concern me is indiscriminate use of streamers to search pools and likely spots, as even a six inch trout will chase a two inch fly, and if it gets caught there's a much greater chance of damage than if the same fish were to take a size 18 black gnat meant for his elders and betters.

Assuming that wild trout will be returned if undersized, I'd want to avoid catching small ones accidentally on big hooks.
 

Dingbat

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I have no problem with targeting large wild browns on streamers, and if I know where one is (and the rules permit) I will happily put up a 0X leader and a size 8 longshank muddler or woolly b*gger, if I can't shift the thing on a similar size dry sedge or moth pattern. I certainly don't consider the method inferior to dry fly, nymph, upstream wet fly or even downstream wet fly. What does concern me is indiscriminate use of streamers to search pools and likely spots, as even a six inch trout will chase a two inch fly, and if it gets caught there's a much greater chance of damage than if the same fish were to take a size 18 black gnat meant for his elders and betters.

Assuming that wild trout will be returned if undersized, I'd want to avoid catching small ones accidentally on big hooks.
I use a Zonker - specifically one like this (I thought it had another name ...):


and sometimes run it through a pool *after* I have failed to catch something. The smaller fish will only manage to bit the tail and hence won't get caught but you will feel it. The smart-a$$ big ones that ignored my perfectly presented fly tend to discover that they make a good rillette.

Although I find that they work best in early and late season. The aggression of the fish is something else - the first time I was so startled I tried to save the zonker by pulling it out of the fish's mouth :eek:
 

three rivers

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I use a Zonker - specifically one like this (I thought it had another name ...):


and sometimes run it through a pool *after* I have failed to catch something. The smaller fish will only manage to bit the tail and hence won't get caught but you will feel it. The smart-a$$ big ones that ignored my perfectly presented fly tend to discover that they make a good rillette.

Although I find that they work best in early and late season. The aggression of the fish is something else - the first time I was so startled I tried to save the zonker by pulling it out of the fish's mouth :eek:
That does look more suitable where small fish are present - I imagine you could produce a two inch 'fly' on a size 10 normal shank hook, which is about as large as I'd want to go. I'll have to tie a couple up and try them; there's a dark tunnel of blackthorn over a pool on a stretch of my local stream from which a friend managed to conjure a pound and a half brown, on a sedge drifted downstream and twitched back up.
 
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