Streamer fishing for wild brown trout.?

SirHarryLewis

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That’s a cracking fish for above the lakes, never mind above lexlip
It’s not an area I’ve fished much, I usually fish the Liffey around Clane and Straffan. Nothing more than 2lb from the Liffey this year, I stalked one around 5lb for 2 hrs one night this summer. He was taking spinners but only about 1 in 10 that passed him. The closest I got was when he nudged two of my offerings, but with no intention of taking.
The Boyne is somewhere else that fishes well to streamers, potential for a monster.
4 more more weeks for a biggie, tight lines!
He is far from a solitary 2LB fish though. Locals who fish it a lot say there are certainly more of him up there. Hanging about under trees, they are usually fairly experienced fish though so a real challenge. Tight lines indeed (must try the Boyne and the Kings river at some point)
 

SirHarryLewis

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There seems to a difference on opinion on whether one should use smaller streamers in clear water.

Clonav only sell one size. Massive
 

thetrouttickler

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Locals who fish it a lot say there are certainly more of him up there. Hanging about under trees, they are usually fairly experienced fish though so a real challenge.
I was fishing a chalkstream on Saturday, where it is against the rules to use a streamer. But my point is more one of general application. I was in the river, wading up next to a small tree completely overhanging the water. The type of tree where the lowest branches are submerged in the water. A good current flowed under the tree but it was impossible to cast a fly beneath it. It had big fish lie written all over it, but you shrug your shoulders and hope perhaps the fish has left the cover of the tree and you may catch it conventionally. I gather they tend to do it more often at first and last light and it becomes more a fluke of timing than anything else. I saw a large dark shape in the margin of the opposite bank and thought bingo. I cast countless times at at, changing pattern frequently, but it was unmoved. Something about its shape looked odd but it was difficult to see much beyond the glare. I inched closer and thought how odd that it hadn't spooked, and then I could tell it was a jack pike. Duh.

By now I was abreast with the tree and focusing on the water above it. There was a splash in the water beneath the tree and grunting noises, akin to the noises made by dogs. I thought wtf, there shouldn't be any dog walkers here (private land and all that). I crouched down to look under the tree branches and saw two slicked back wet heads looking at me - otters! Anyway, sure as anything, a very large trout spooked out from under the tree. Talking 4lbs plus.

On a non chalkstream, i.e. where rules permit, perhaps a weighted streamer allowed to drift downstream below the tree branches and jigged back upriver might do the trick? Worry extricating the fish from the tree and landing it only if hooked!
 

Liathach

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Oliver Edwards did a DVD on the subject & caught some decent fish,
I'd recommend that too. Very informative and even more interesting. That said some of his patterns are more model making than fly tying and no more effective than a simple woolly bugger
 

SirHarryLewis

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I was fishing a chalkstream on Saturday, where it is against the rules to use a streamer. But my point is more one of general application. I was in the river, wading up next to a small tree completely overhanging the water. The type of tree where the lowest branches are submerged in the water. A good current flowed under the tree but it was impossible to cast a fly beneath it. It had big fish lie written all over it, but you shrug your shoulders and hope perhaps the fish has left the cover of the tree and you may catch it conventionally. I gather they tend to do it more often at first and last light and it becomes more a fluke of timing than anything else. I saw a large dark shape in the margin of the opposite bank and thought bingo. I cast countless times at at, changing pattern frequently, but it was unmoved. Something about its shape looked odd but it was difficult to see much beyond the glare. I inched closer and thought how odd that it hadn't spooked, and then I could tell it was a jack pike. Duh.

By now I was abreast with the tree and focusing on the water above it. There was a splash in the water beneath the tree and grunting noises, akin to the noises made by dogs. I thought wtf, there shouldn't be any dog walkers here (private land and all that). I crouched down to look under the tree branches and saw two slicked back wet heads looking at me - otters! Anyway, sure as anything, a very large trout spooked out from under the tree. Talking 4lbs plus.

On a non chalkstream, i.e. where rules permit, perhaps a weighted streamer allowed to drift downstream below the tree branches and jigged back upriver might do the trick? Worry extricating the fish from the tree and landing it only if hooked!

Does a damsel nymph imitation count as a streamer?
 

SirHarryLewis

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I was fishing a chalkstream on Saturday, where it is against the rules to use a streamer. But my point is more one of general application. I was in the river, wading up next to a small tree completely overhanging the water. The type of tree where the lowest branches are submerged in the water. A good current flowed under the tree but it was impossible to cast a fly beneath it. It had big fish lie written all over it, but you shrug your shoulders and hope perhaps the fish has left the cover of the tree and you may catch it conventionally. I gather they tend to do it more often at first and last light and it becomes more a fluke of timing than anything else. I saw a large dark shape in the margin of the opposite bank and thought bingo. I cast countless times at at, changing pattern frequently, but it was unmoved. Something about its shape looked odd but it was difficult to see much beyond the glare. I inched closer and thought how odd that it hadn't spooked, and then I could tell it was a jack pike. Duh.

By now I was abreast with the tree and focusing on the water above it. There was a splash in the water beneath the tree and grunting noises, akin to the noises made by dogs. I thought wtf, there shouldn't be any dog walkers here (private land and all that). I crouched down to look under the tree branches and saw two slicked back wet heads looking at me - otters! Anyway, sure as anything, a very large trout spooked out from under the tree. Talking 4lbs plus.

On a non chalkstream, i.e. where rules permit, perhaps a weighted streamer allowed to drift downstream below the tree branches and jigged back upriver might do the trick? Worry extricating the fish from the tree and landing it only if hooked!

I'd say every fisherman would identify with this. I do think more experienced and patient fisherman than myself know that's its best to walk on by difficult to fish areas. I alas haven't the discipline
 

SirHarryLewis

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Oh well, I dont know what traditional means then.

Tell me. Has anyone found any benefits to fishing a sinktip line with a streamer?? I can see the theoretical advantage in that the retrieve would be straighter . However I havent heard anyone experienced tell me that it makes a practical difference
 

Dingbat

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Oh well, I dont know what traditional means then.

Tell me. Has anyone found any benefits to fishing a sinktip line with a streamer?? I can see the theoretical advantage in that the retrieve would be straighter . However I havent heard anyone experienced tell me that it makes a practical difference
Depends on the flow of the stream. With fast flow the bouyancy is higher and a sink tip can help keep the fly down
 

running bear

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Oh well, I dont know what traditional means then.

Tell me. Has anyone found any benefits to fishing a sinktip line with a streamer?? I can see the theoretical advantage in that the retrieve would be straighter . However I havent heard anyone experienced tell me that it makes a practical difference
I have various sink rate short heads made from 2 or 3 line sizes up for very deep and\or fast stuff. tips are useful but can only do so much. Running line on reel and attach a short head from a foam spool. Some guys even put the rod and reel as deep as they can, chin to the water when stripping, I've seen a few on the Avonmore at that.
 

SirHarryLewis

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I have various sink rate short heads made from 2 or 3 line sizes up for very deep and\or fast stuff. tips are useful but can only do so much. Running line on reel and attach a short head from a foam spool. Some guys even put the rod and reel as deep as they can, chin to the water when stripping, I've seen a few on the Avonmore at that.
My wooly buggers are so heavy they sink right away. Is this the avonmore in wichlow??

I never considered streamers for that place. Always considers the trout a little small for them. Maybe it's just a smaller streamer
 

Dingbat

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Yeah but I have very heavy streamers so Im not sure there is a need for that
yes there is. they sink while they are static . if you pull them upstream the flow of the water pushes them to the surface. I use a short heavy polyline, makes all the difference. Try it
My wooly buggers are so heavy they sink right away. Is this the avonmore in wichlow??

I never considered streamers for that place. Always considers the trout a little small for them. Maybe it's just a smaller streamer
I used one on the Newport river (Tipp.) and had three wee things so excited by it they literally chased it up to my boots, looked up saw me and sped off.
 

SirHarryLewis

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yes there is. they sink while they are static . if you pull them upstream the flow of the water pushes them to the surface. I use a short heavy polyline, makes all the difference. Try it


I used one on the Newport river (Tipp.) and had three wee things so excited by it they literally chased it up to my boots, looked up saw me and sped off.
Oh I'm in Tipp. I've had two large trout and a perch off of it in the Suir. Even downstream, it still sinks a foot. I considers using a smaller streamer and a sinking line in clearer water. I have sink tip line anyhow so I might give it a go.
 

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